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I 






BIBLIOTHEC-aE 

ECCLESLE CATHEDRALIS ELpiNSIS 

DONO DEDIT, 

GEORGIUS PEACOCK, 

Ejubduc EociESi^ DECA^nrB. 



CJ'. 



N>V.-». 



CXa-^ K 







' fl 


t 



1 



TRUSTS, STATUTES AND DIEECTIONS 



"^tthiml^p, S%te|ip« aiA |prij{s 



|cr intmfinimris of % Wniitmitg. 




CAMBEIDQE 

PRINTED BY a J. CLAY, ILA. AT THE 

18S7. 



INDEX. 



PART I. 



PROFESSOESHIPS. 



PAOB 



I. — The Lady Margaret's Professorship of Diviniiy ... 1 

1. Deed of Foundation, Nativ. Virgin Mary, 18 H. VII. . . ib* 

2. Convention of Ahhot of Westminster, July 1, 18 H. VII. • 9 

3. Decree of Court of Augmentations, June 10, 34 H. VIII. . 10 

4. Statute 10 Anne c. 45 12 

5. Grant of Land hy Alice Davers, 1625 15 

II. — Regius Professorships of Divinity, Hehrew and Greek . . 18 

1. Statute " de trium lectomm officio " ib, 

2. Letters Patent of King Charles 11. April 8, 13 Ch. II. . . 23 

a Statute 10 Anne c. 45 25 

4. Statute 3 and 4 Vict. c. 113, sect. 12 and 70 . . . . ib. 

III. — ^Adams' Professorship of Arahic ...... 26 

1. Letters Patent of King Charles IL July 4,il8 Ch.IL. . ib, 

2. Extract from Will of Mr. Pahner . . .29 

IV. — Lucasian Professorship of Mathematics 30 

1. Deed of Foundation, Dec. 19, 15 Ch. II ib. 

2. Grant of King Charles II. Jan. 18, 15 Ch. II. . . .34 

3. Grant of King Charles II. April 20, 17 Ch.IL. . .35 

v.— Knighthridge Professorship of Moral Theology ... 37 
Indenture made under authority of the Court of Chancery, 

June 4, 1847 ib. 

VI«— 'FLumian Professorship of Astronomy 53 

1. Will of Dr. Plume, Sept. 2, 1704, and orders of the Court of 

Chancery thereon . . ib. 



IV TNDBX. 

PAOK 

2. CoTenant of Master and Seniors of Trinity College, Feb. 9, 

1705 54 

3. Letters Patent of Qneen Anne^ June 11^ 6 Anne . . ib» 

4. Dr. Smith's Augmentation 1708 . ^ .... 59 

VII.— Professorship of Modem History 61 

1. Letters patent of King George I. Sept 28^ 11 6. 1. . ib. 

2. Letters Patent of King Geoige IL April 11, 1 G. II. . .65 

VIII. — ^Woodwardian Professorship of Geology 67 

Extract from Dr Woodward's Will, Oct. 1, 1727 . . . ib. 

IX. — Lowndean Professorship of Astronomy and Geometry • 73 

Extract from Mr. Lowndes' Will, May 6, 1748. , . . ib. 

X. — Foundations of Mr. Norris 74 

1. Order of the Lord Chancellor for payment of the Annuity, 

Nov. 3, 1781 ib. 

2. Copy of Mr. Norris' Manuscript 82 

3. Extract from Will and Codicil of Dr. Chapman . . . 95 

4. Lord Wodehouse's Benefaction 96 

XI.— Jacksonian Professorship of Natural Philosophy ... 97 

Extract from Mr. Jackson's Will ib, 

XII.— bisney Professorship of Archaeology Ill 

Deed of Foundation, May 28, 1851 ib. 



PART II. 



SCHOLARSHIPS. 

PAOB 

I.— The Craven 115 

1. Extract .from the Will of John Lord Craven^ May 28, 1647 ib. 

2. Conveyance and Indenture of William Lord Craven^ July 

5,1664 ' . . . ' . * ib. 

3. Memorandum ; and Letter of William Lord Craven, Aug. 

13, 1681 117 

4. Rules for the choice of the Scholars, Dec. 8, 1701 . . 118 

5. Grace of the Senate, Oct. 81, 1724 119 

6. Extract from Order in Chancery, March 9, 1819 . . . 120 

7. Extract from Order in Chancery, June 22, 1841 • . . t&. 

II.— TheBattie 121 

1. Dr. William Battle's Deed of Gift, Sept. 30, 1747 . . ib. 

2. Rules for the Election of the Scholar 126 

III.— Sir William Browne's Foundations ... . . 130 

1. Extract from Sir William Browne's Will, Feh. 11, 1770, and 

Codicil, July 21, 1773 ib. 

2. Rules for the choice of the Scholar, April 18, 1782 . . 131 

IV.-The Davkfl' 134 

v.— TheBeU 135 

VL— The Pitt 142 

VII.— Mr. Tyrwhitt's Benefection 145 

VIII— The Crosse 146 



I 



VI INDEX. 



k 



PAOB 

PRIZES. 

IX.— The Person 149 

1.— The Seatonian 152 

II.— Dr. Smith's 153 

III. — Sir William Browne's Medals «ft. 

IV.— The Norriaian ib. 

v.— The Hulsean t6. 

VI.— The Person 154 

VII. — Sir Peregrine Maitlands 157 

VIII.— The Bumey 159 

IX.— The Adams' 161 

X.— TheLeBas 163 

XI._The Cams Greek Testament 164 

XIL— The Scholefield 166 



J 



J 



PART III. 



f 



. VIII. 



OTHER GIFTS AND ENDOWMENTS. 

I.—The Lady Margaret's Preachership ' 

1. Deed of Foundation, Oct 30, 20 H. VII. . 

2. Convention of Abbot of Westminster, Nov. 7, 21 H. VII. 

3. Decree of Court of Augmentations, June 10, 34 H. VIII. 

4. Letter of King Charles II., Oct. 30, 1^9 . 

II. — Commemoration of King Henry the Seventh . 

1. Foundation Deed, Nov. 20, 20 H. VII. . 

2. Decree of Court of Augmentations, Oct. 10, 36 H. 

3. University Statutes, 12 Eliz. c. 45 

III. — The Bamaby Lecturers 

1. Foundation of Sir Robert Reade, Dec 10, 1524 

2. Statuta antiqua. No. 136 
IV. — Endowment of Mr. Mere, 1559 .... 

V. — The University Ahnshouses .... 
Extract from Mr. Stokys' WiU, Nov. 17, 1590 

VL — Hobson's Workhouse Charity .... 

VII. — Endowments of Mr. Crane .... 



VIIL— Mr. Rustat's Donation to the Library 
IX.— Lady Badler's Endowment for Algebra Lecturers 



PAGE 

. 169 

ib. 

. 175 

. 177 
. 180 

. 181 

ib. 
. 185 
. 186 

. 187 

ib. 

. 195 

. 196 

. 199 
ib. 

. 204 

. 215 



. 219 
. 222 



viii INDBX. 

PAOB 

X.— Endowments of Mr. Worts ... ... 238 

Copy of Mr. Worts' WiU, June 21, 1709 ib. 

XL— The Botanic Garden .246 

1. Dr. Walker's Foundation . . , , ib. 

2. Lord Maynard's Legacy, 1775 ...... 257 

3. Benefiaction of Mr. Betham, 1783 258 

4. Purchase of New Botanic Garden 259 

5. Appropriation to the Universily of the site of the old Garden 260 
XII.— Foundations of Mr. Hulse 262 

1. Mr. Hulse's Will and Codicils ib. 

2. Order of Court of Chancery 310 

XIIL— The Fitzwilliam Museum 313 

1. Extract from Lord Fitzwilliam's Will ib. 

2. Extract from Mr. Mesman's Will 315 



TRUSTS, STATUTES AND DIRECTIONS 



AFFECTINa THE 



!r0ks0rs^)^s d % Smirersitg. 



L The Ladt Marqaret^s Pbofbssobsuip. 

1. Fundatio Dominae Margaretae Comitissae Richmond de uno 
Lectore publico in sacra theologia cum Statutis. 

Tn Dbi NOMINE. Amen. Cum excellentissimus Rex Henricus Septi- 
mus, Dei gratia rex Angliae et Franciae et Dominus Hiberniae, 
de gratia sua speciali ac ex certa scientia et mero motu suis per 
literas suas patentes, quarum datum est apud Westmonasterium 
decimo die Decembris anno regni sui duodecimo, concesserit et 
licentiam dederit nobis Margaretae Comitissae Richmond matri 
ejusdem Domini regis et executoribus nostris, quod nos praefata 
Comitissa ve] executores nostri seu nostrum aliquis vel aliqui 
unam Lecturam perpetuam unius Lectoris perpetui sacrae Theo- 
logiae ad laudem et honorem sanctae et individuae Trinitatis ac 
fidei Christianorum augmentum, necnon ad nostrae animae et 
animarum parentum, progenitorum et antecessorum nostrorum 
ac omnium fidelium defunctorum salutem in Universitate Can- 
tabrigiae Elien : Dioc : juxta ordinationes et statuta nostra 
vel executorum nostrorum, fundare, creare, erigere et stabilire 
possimus, possit aut possint: Et quod Lectura ilia, cum sic 
fundata, creata, erecta, et stabilita fuerit, Lectura sacrae Theo- 
logiae per Margaretam Comitissam Richmond matrem regis 
Henrici septimi in Universitate Cantabrigiae fundata nuncupetur: 
Ac quod Lector Lecturae illius pro tempore existens sit unum 
corpus in re et nomine habeatque successionem perpetuam : Et 
quod ipse et successores sui per nomen Lectoris Lecturae sacrae 
Theologiae per Margaretam Comitissam Richmotid matrem regis 
Henrici septimi in Universitate Cantabrigiae ordinati in om- 
nibus et omnimodis actionibus, seetis, causis, querelis et placitis, 
tam realibus quam personalibus et mixtis, ac placitis assisae novae 
disseisinae, et in omnibus aliis materiis et causis quibuscunque, 
in quibuscunque curiis tam spiritualibus quam temporalibus, 
implacitare possint et implacitari, respondere et responderi, ac 
per idem nomen perquirere, recipere, appropriare, consolidare, 
annectere et unire, habere, gaudere et possidere sibi et succes- 
soribus suis, ac dare et concedere possint terras, tenementa, 

1 



redditus, reversiones, servitia, pensionee, portiones, apportus et 
annuitates, ac advocationes, hospitalia, prioratus, liberas capellas, 
ac alia benefioia ecclesiastica quaecunque, necnon omnia et 
omnimoda haereditamenta ac alias possessiones quascunque ac 
bona et catalla quaecunque prout in eisdem literis patentibus 
plenius continetur. Nos antedicta Comitissa ratione et vigore 
literarum patentium praedictarum, ac auctoritate nobis per easdem 
literas patentes concessa, in die et festo nativitatis beatae Mariae 
Virginis anno regni dicti Domini regis decimo octavo, unam 
Lecturam perpetuara sacrae Theologiae uniiis Lectoris perpetui 
in dicta Universitate Cantabrigiae, videlicet in domo communis 
scholae sacrae Theologiae ibidem, erigimus, creamus^ fundamus 
et stabilimus per praesentes, et Lecturam illam Lecturam sacrae 
Theologiae per Margaretam Comitissam Richmond matrem 
regis Henrici septimi in Universitate Cantabrigiae fundatam nun- 
cupari, nominari et vocari ordinamus per praesentes. Et quen- 
dam Magistrum Johannem Fyssher, sacrae Theologiae Profes- 
sorem, primum Lectorem Lecturae praedictae, pro uno anno 
integro jam proximo future, facimus, creamus et ordinamus per; 
praesentes. Et quod idem Lector habeat successionem perpetuam, 
quodque idem Lector et successores sui sint unum corpus in re et 
nomine ; et quod ipse et successores sui per nomen Lectoris Lec- 
turae sacrae Theologiae per Margaretam Comitissam Kichmond 
matrem regis Henrici septimi in Universitate Cantabrigiae fun- 
datae, in omnibus et omnimodis actionibus, sectis, causis, querelis 
et placitis, tam realibus quam personalibus et mixtis, ac placitis 
assisae novae disseisinae, et in omnibus aliis materiis et causis 
quibuscunque, in quibuscunque curiis tam spiritualibus quam 
temporalibus, implacitare possint et implacitari, respondere et 
responderi, ac per idem nomen perquirere, recipere, appropriare, 
consolidare, annectere et unire, habere, gaudere et possidere 
sibi et successoribus suis, ac dare et concedere possint terras, 
• tenementa, redditus, reversiones, servitia, pensiones, portiones, 
apportus et annuitates ac advocationes, hospitalia, prioratus, 
liberas capellas, ac alia beneficia ecclesiastica quaecunque, nee 
non omnia et omnimoda haereditamenta quaecunque, ac alias 
possessiones quascunque, ac bona et catalla quaecunque. Yolumus 
insuper et ordinamus per praesentes quod praedictus Lector et 
i^uccessores sui Lectores Lecturae praedictae leget aut legent in^ 



loco et scholia praedictis, libere, solemniter et aperte cuilibet 
illuc venienti absque aliquo pretio^ praeterquam ex dono^ assigna- 
tione et provisione nostris, pro eodem capiendo talia opera in 
divinis prout Cancellario aut Vice-Cancellario Universitatis prae- 
dictae pro tempore existenti aut eorum sen eorum alterius 
deputato cum collegio Doctorum ejusdcm Universitatis fore 
videbitur necessaria et opportuna, circiter unam horam integram, 
videlicet ab hora septima ante meridiem usque ad horam octavam 
tunc proximo sequentem, vel per talem horam, qualis dicto 
Cancellario aut Yice-Cancellario seu eorum vel eorum alterius 
deputato et Doctoribus praedictis pro tempore praesentibus fore 
videbitur opportuna. Et quod dictus Lector et quilibet succes- 
sorum suorum incipiet Lecturam suam praed^ctam prime die 
cujuslibet termini in dicta Universitate usitato et sic continuabit 
quoUbet die legibili accustumato usque ad finidm cujuslibet eorun- 
dem terminorum, nisi per Cancellarium aut Vice-Cancellarium 
Universitatis praedictae pro tempore exist^ntem seu eorum vel 
eorum alterius deputatum causa infirmitatis vel alia causa ratio- 
nabili alitor licentiatus fuerit. Tamen volnmus et ordinamus 
per praesentes quod dictus Lector pro tempore existens de 
Lectura sua praedicta cesset tempore quadragesimali, si per 
Cancellarium aut Yice-Cancellarium Universitatis praedictae pro 
tempore existentem vel eorum i^eu eorum alterius deputatum 
inde licentiatus fuerit ea intentione, quod ipse et auditores ejus- 
dem lecturae ad praedicandum eodem tempore melius et liberiuff 
se disponant. Et volumus quod dictus Lector et quilibet suc- 
cessorum suorum qui pro tempore fuerit continuabit Lecturam 
suam praedictam annuatim quolibet anno in magna vacatione in 
Universitate praedicta usitata usque ad festum Nativitatis beatae 
Mariae Virginia, nisi per Cancellarium aut Yice-Cancellarium 
Universitatis praedictae pro tempore existentem vel eorum seu 
eorum alterius deputatum causa infirmitatis vel alia causa^ 
rationabili alitor ut praedicitur licentiatus fuerit. Et ulterius 
volumus et ordinamus per praesentes quod nullus Lector Lec- 
turae praedictae qui pro tempore fuerit cessabit a Lectura sua 
praedicta ultra quatuor dies in uno termino, nisi sit pro causa 
rationabili et legitima coram Cancellario aut Vice-Cancellario 
Universitatis praedictae vel eorum seu eorum alterius deputatum 
et majore parte Doctorum sacrae Theologiae pro tempore ibidem 

1—2 



existentium cognita et probata, et licentia inde a praefato Can- 
cellario vel Vice-Cancellario aut eorum seu eorum alterius 
deputato prius petita, habita et obtenta. Yolumus etiam quod 
per talem licentiam nullus hujusmodi Lector se absentet a 
Lectura praedicta ultra quatuordecim dies in uno termino; 
et quod idem Lector tempore suae absentiae aliam personam - 
aptam, habilem et idoneam vice et loco suis, qualis per dictum 
Cancellarium aut Vice-Cancellarium vel eorum seu eorum alte- 
rius deputatum una cum majore numero Doctorum praedictorum 
videbitur fore sufficiens, ad legendum in sacra Theologia in loco 
et horis praedictis per totum tempus illud sumptibus suis propriis 
providebit. Et volumus insuper quod de caetero quolibet biennio 
ultimo die cessationis cujuslibet termini, ante magnam vacatio- 
nem Universitatis praedictae, una apta, habilis et idonea persona 
in Lectorem Lecturae praedictae pro uno biennio integro, videlicet 
a festo Nativitatis beatae Mariae Virginis tunc proxime sequente, 
duntaxat duraturum eligatur sub forma quae sequitur; videlicet 
quod Cancellarius aut Vice-Cancellarius Universitatis praedictae 
qui pro tempore fuerit vel eorum seu eorum alterius deputatus 
necnon omnes Doctores, tam seculares quam regulares, Inceptores 
et Baccalaurei in divinis, qui antea fuerint in artibus Kegentesin 
Universitate praedicta, ad tunc in eadem Universitate existentes 
qui interesse voluerint conveniant; videlicet, quolibet ultimo die 
cessationis termini praedicti, ante magnam vacationem, in domo 
vocata le assemble bowse in Universitate praedicta, et ibidem 
quilibet Doctorum, Inceptorum, et Baccalaureorum praedictorum, 
coram Canoellario aut Vice-Cancellario Universitatis praedictae 
pro tempore existente, vel eorum seu eorum alterius deputato, jura- 
mentum solemniter praestabit corporale ad eligendum eundem 
Lectorem qui tunc erit, aut aliam talem personam aptam, babilem 
et idoneam, qualis sibi melius et utilius videbitur expedire, 
omni favore, partialitate, mercede, timore et affectione sinistra 
totaliter po§tpositis; Quo finito idem Cancellarius aut Vice-Can- 
cellarius vel eorum seu eorum alterius deputatus cum Doctore et 
Baccalaureo senioribus ibidem existentibus accipiet scrutinium 
de singulis votis et vocibus omnium eorundem Doctorum, In- 
ceptorum et Baccalaureorum ibidem existentium, propriis eorum 
manibus subscriptis, et eidem Cancellario aut Vice-Cancellario, 
aut eorum seu eorum alterius deputato, Doctore et Baccalaureo 



Benioribus praefatis secrete deliberatis^ incipiendo sorutinium illud 
a juniore Baccalaureo et sic ascendendo usque ad seniorem 
Doctorem tunc ibidem existentem ; Et ilium, qui pluribus votis 
et vocibus in electione ilia praevalebit, inLectoremLecturaeprae- 
dictae per dictum Cancellarium aut Vice-Cancellarium, vel eorum 
seu eorum alterius deputatum, pro duobus annis integris, ut prae- 
dictum est, admitti volumus et ordinamus per praesentes: Pro- 
viso semper quod, si sint diversae personae aequales voces in elec- 
tione ilia habentes, tunc ilia persona earumdem personarum, quae 
votum et vocem dicti Canoellarii aut Vice-Cancellarii seu eorum 
vel eorum alterius deputati obtinuerit ineadem electione, praevale- 
bit. Et volumus quod ante quamlibet hujusmodi electionem Can- 
cellarius aut Vice-Cancellarius Universitatis praedictae, vel eorum 
seu eorum alterius deputatus, solemniter publicari et declarari 
faciet in omnibus scholis Universitatis praedictae quolibet anno 
per tres dies legibiles ultimum diem cessationis cujuslibet termini 
ante magnam vacationem praedictam proximo praecedentes, quod 
omnes et singuli interesse in electione ilia habentes die et loco 
praedictis ad eandem electionem fiendam si voluerint conveniant. 
Etiam volumus et ordinamus per praesentes quod si contingat 
aliquem Lectorum praedictorum ordinationi et voluntati nos- 
tris supradictis contravenire, aut de aliquo crimine, vitio vel 
malefacto per Cancellarium aut Vice-Cancellarium Universitatis 
praedictae pro tempore existentem, vel eorum seu eorum alterius 
deputatum, et majorem numerum Doctorum in Universitate 
praedicta tunc ibidem existentium notari, tunc idem Lector 
primo, secundo et tertio inde moneatur; et si ad secundam 
monitionem se non reformaverit cum effectu, tunc per substrac- 
tionem stipendii sui secundum discretionem Cancellarii aut 
Vice-Cancellarii, vel eorum seu eorum alterius deputati, et Doc- 
torum illorum puniatur, quae pecunia sic substracta ad utilitatem 
Universitatis praedictae per discretionem ejusdem Cancellarii aut 
Vice-Cancellarii disponatur; et si post tertiam monitionem se 
non reformaverit, tunc a Lectura sua et servitio suo praedicto 
penitus amoveatur. Et volumus et ordinamus per praesentes 
quod, quotiescunque Lectura praedicta de Lectore per talem 
amotionem aut per mortem vel cessionem alicujus Lectoris seu 
aliquo alio modo quocunque vacaverit, tunc Cancellarius aut 
Vice-Cancellarius Universitatis praedictae, vel eorum seu eorum 



alterius deputatas, indilate solemniter publicabit et declarari 
faciei in omnibus scholis dictae Universitatis, si infra aliquem 
terminum Lecturam praedictam sic vacare contigerit, per ires 
dies legibiles tunc proxime sequentes quod Lectura pracdicta 
a Lectore vacaverit, et, si sit extra terminum, tunc idem 
Cancellarius aut Yice-Cancellarius, vel eorum seu eorum alterius 
deputatus, illud publicari faciet in duobus locis communioribus 
Universitatis praedictae, videlicet, ad ostium introitus in com- 
munes scholas et ad ostium ecclesiae sanctae Mariae Virginia, 
in scriptis sigillo ejusdem Cancellarii aut Vice-Cancellarii, vel 
eorum seu eorum alterius deputati, consignatis, ibidem per 
quatuor dies tunc proxime sequentes permansuris, ad praemoni- 
endum omnes et singulos interesse in electione praedicta habentes 
convenire ad domum praedictam vocatam le assemble bowse 
quinto die proxime post primam monitionem sic factam ad 
electionem novi Lectoris in forma praedicta faciendam. Et 
tunc idem Cancellarius aut Vice-Cancellarius, vel eorum seu eorum 
alterius deputatus, simul cum Doctoribus et Baccalaureis prae- 
dictis, procedant et faciant electionem novi Lectoris in omnibus 
modo et forma supradictis. Et volumus quod dictus Cancel- 
larius aut Vice-Cancellarius vel eorum seu eorum alterius deputa- 
tus immediate post admissionem cujuscunque Lectoris Lecturae 
praedictae inpraesentiaDoctorum, Inceptorum etBaccalaureorum 
praedictorum tunc ibidem existentium publico declarabit seu 
declarari faciet fundationem et ordinationes nostras in praesen- 
tibus contentas et specificatas. Volumus etiam quod quilibet 
Lector Lecturae praedictae immediate post admissionem suam 
praedictam coram praefato Cancellario aut Vice-Cancellario, vel 
eorum seu eorum alterius deputato, et Doctoribus praedictis 
tune ibidem existentibus, juramentum solemniter praestabit 
corporate quod ipse omnes et singulas ordinationes nostras Lec- 
turam praedictam concernentes pro parte suajuxtavim, formam 
et effectum earundem bene et fideliter observabit et adimplebit. 
Et volumus et ordinamus per praesentes quod quilibet Lector 
Lecturae praedictae, qui in aliquo ultimo die cessationis alicujus 
termini ante magnam vacationem praedictam, vel post eundem 
ultimum diem, et ante primum diem Octobris tunc proxime sequen- 
tem, in Lectorem Lecturae praedictae juxta ordinationes nostras 
praedictas eligetur, incipiet Lecturam suam praedictam primo die 



termini tunc proxime sequentis, et sic usque ad festum nativitatis 
beatae Mariae Virginis tunc proxime sequens juxta ordinationes 
nostras praedictas continuabit. Et quod quilibet Lector Lee- 
turae praedictae, qui aliquo tempore anni post primum diem 
Octobris infra unum annum tunc proxime sequentem post 
mortem, amotionem vel cessionem alicujus Lectoris Lecturae 
praedictae in Lectorem Lecturae illius ut praefertur electus 
fuerifc, incipiet Lecturam suam praedictam infra quatuordecim 
dies post electionem hujusmodi proxime sequentes, si infra 
aliquem terminum fuerit, et, si extra terminum fuerit, tunc 
incipiet Lecturam suam praedictam infra octo dies proxime post 
inceptionem termini tunc proxime sequentis. Et quod quilibet 
hujusmodi Lector sic post mortem, amotionem sive cessionem 
alicujus Lectoris Lecturae praedictae electus continuabit Lec- 
turam suam praedictam juxta ordinationes nostras praedictas 
usque ad festum nativitatis beatae Mariae Virginis electionem 
suam tunc proxime sequens. Et ulterius volumus et ordinamus 
per praesentes quod quilibet Lectorum praedictorum, qui pro 
tempore fuerit, circa principium et iinem cujuslibet termini 
solemniter declarari et publicari faciet fundationem Lecturae 
praedictae, et ibidem, durante vita nostra, exhortetur omnes et 
singulos ibidem praesentes devote cum ipso dicere hunc psalmum, 
Deu8 misereatur nostri^ cum speciali coUecta pro bono statu 
nostro fundatricis Lecturae praedictae; et post decessum nos- 
trum hunc psalmum, De profundis clamavi, cum speciali coUecta 
pro anima nostra et alia generali coUecta pro animabus omnium 
progenitorum et antecessorum nostrorum ac omnium fidelium 
defunctorum. Volumus insuper quod praedictus Lector semper 
semel in anno, circa medium unius termini, banc nostram funda- 
tionem publico et solemniter loco unius Lecturae de verbo in 
verbum distincte leget, et etiam ut praedicitur orabit ac alios 
orare exhortabitur. Et etiam volumus et ordinamus quod 
quilibet Lector Lecturae praedictae pro tempore existens in 
qualibet missa sua devote dicet pro bono statu nostro, durante 
vita nostra, banc coUectam, Deus qui jmtificaa impium <S*c. 
cum secreto et postcommunione una cum speciali memoria 
inostri in suo memento pro vivis ; et post decessum nostrum Deus 
cui proprium minorem, cum secreto et postcommunione una cum 
speciali memoria pro anima nostra et animabus progenitorum et 



8 

antecessorutn nostrorum in suo memento pro mortuis. Et volu- 
mus et ordinamus quod quilibet Lector Lecturae praedictae pro 
tempore existens habeat pro ealario, stipendio et labore euis, 
videlicet, pro quolibet anno tresdeeim librae, sex solidos et octo 
denarios bonae et legalis monetae Angliae, per Abbatem, Priorem 
et Conventum Monasterii beati Petri Westmonasteriensis et 
successores sues ad festa Paschae et Sancti Michaelis archangeli 
per aequales portiones, juxta vohintatem nostram in qmbusdam 
Indenturis inter nos et praefatos Abbatem, Priorem et Con- 
ventum inde confectis specificatam et declaratam, bene et fideli* 
ter in dicta Universitate Cantabrigiae solvenda. Et volumus 
et ordinamaB per praesentes quod, quandocunque et totiens 
quotiens aliquis Lector Leeturae praedictae in officium Cai^ 
cellarii aut Vice-Cancellarii Univereitatis praedictae electus et 
praefectus fuerit, ex tunc idem Lector, sic in officium Can- 
cellarii aut Vice-Cancellarii electus, Lecturam suam in Lectura 
praedicta in forma supradicta a tempore cujuslibet electionis 
faujusmodi per unum mensem tunc proxime sequentem et non 
ultra continuabit, et quod infra quindecim dies post electionem 
cujuslibet hujusmodi Lectoris in officium Cancellarii aut Vice- 
Cancellarii Universitatis praedictae novus Lector Lecturae prae- 
dictae eligatur in forma praedicta, et in officium ejusdem Lec- 
turae a fine ejusdem mensis usque ad festum nativitatis beatae 
Mariae Virginis tunc proxime sequens continuabit, et Lecturam 
praedictam a fine ejusdem mensis usque ad idem festum terminis, 
diebus, horis et loco praedictis juxta formam praedictam bene 
et fideliter observabit. Nos tamen praefata Comitissa auc- 
toritatem et potestatem explanandi, reformandi et corrigendi 
omnes et singulas ordinationes praedictas et earum quamlibet, 
et etiam easdem ordinationes minuendi et in melius mutandi, ac 
alias ordinationes congruas, utiles et necessarias, ordinationibus 
nostris supradictis ac omnibus aliis ordinationibus nostris 
fiendis et eorum cuilibet addendi, durante vita nostra, totiens 
quotiens nobis videbitur expedire, reservamus per praesentes. 
In cujus rei testimonium praesentibus tripartitis indentatis 
sigillum nostrum apposuimus : Datum dicto die et festo nativitatis 
beatae Mariae Virginis anno regni dicti Domini Regis Henrici 
septimi decimo octavo supradicto. 



2. Conventio Abbatis Westmonasteriensis pro solutione stipendii 
Lectoris publid in sacra theologia a Domina Margareta 
Comitissa Richmond instituti. 

Omnibus Christi fidelibus ad quos praesens scriptum pervenerit 
Johannes Abbas monasterii beati Petri Westmonasteriensis ac 
Prior et Conventus ejusdem monasterii salutem. Sciatis nos 
praefatos Abbatem, Priorem et Conventum unanimi assensu et 
consensu nostris dedisse, concessisse et hac praesenti carta 
nostra confirmasse magistro Johanni Fisher lectori lecturae 
sacrae theologiae, per Margaretam Comitissam Richmond ma- 
trera regis Henrici septimi in Universitate Cantabrigiae 
fundatae, quamdam annuitatem sive annualem redditum tres- 
decim librarum, sex solidorum et octo denariorum ; Habendam, 
percipiendam et levandam praedictam annuitatem sive annualem 
redditum tresdecim librarum, sex solidorum et octo denariorum, 
de nobis praefatis Abbate, Priore et Conventu et successoribus 
nostris praefato lectori lecturae praedictae et successoribus suis in 
perpetuum ad festa Sancti Michaelis archangeli et Paschae in 
, Universitate praedicta annuatim solvendam. Et si oontingat prae- 
dictam annuitatem sive annualem redditum tresdecim librarum, 
sex solidorum et octo denariorum aretro fore praefato lectori 
aut successoribus suis in parte vel in toto per sex septimanas 
post aliquod festum festorum praedictorum quo ut praefertur 
solvi debeat insolutam, quod tunc bene licebit praefato lectori et 
successoribus suis in manerium de Drayton et omnia terras et 
tenementa ipsorum Abbatis, Prioris et Conventus in West 
Drayton, Hillington, Colhara, Woxbridge, Drayton, Willesdon, 
Paddington, Westborn et Kensington in Comitatu Middlesex, 
ac in manerium de Hendon cum pertinentiis ipsorum Abbatis, 
Prioris et Conventus in eodem Comitatu et in quamlibet 
eorumdem parcellam intrare et distringere et districtiones 
sic captas licite asportare, abducere et penes se retinere, 
quousque eidem lectori et successoribus suis de dicta annuitate 
sive annuali redditu tresdecim librarum, sex solidorum et octo 
denariorum et arreragiis ejusdem, si quae fuerint, plenarie 
fuerit satisfactum et persolutum. Et nos praefati Abbas, Prior 
et Conventus concedimus et obligamus nos et successores nostros 
praefato lectori et successoribus suis per praesentes quod toties 



10 

quoties contingat diotam annuitatem sive annualem redditum 
tresdecim librarum, Bex solidorum et octo denariorum aretro 
fore praefato lectori aut successoribus suis in parte vel in toto 
per duos menses post aliquod festum festorum praedictorum, quo 
ut praefertur solvi debeat, nos praefati Abbas, Prior etConventus 
forisfaeiemus et solvemus praefato lectori et successoribus suis 
quadraginta solidos nomine paenae ; et quod bene licebit eidem 
lectori et successoribus suis tam pro dicta annuitate sive annu- 
ali redditu tresdecim librarum, sex solidorum et octo denario- 
rum, quam pro praedictis quadraginta solidis sic nomine paenae 
concessis, in maneria, terras et tenementa praedicta cum perti- 
nentiis et quamlibet eorumdem parcellam intrare et distringere, 
et districtiones sic captas abducere, asportare et penes se retinere, 
quousque eidem lectori et successoribus suis tam de dicta annu- 
itate sive annuali redditu tresdecim librarum, sex solidorum et 
octo denariorum quam de dictis quadraginta solidis ut praefer- 
tur nomine paenae concessis plenarie fuerit satisfactum et per- 
solutum. In cujus rei testimonium huic praesenti scripto nostro 
sigillum nostrum commune apposuimus. Datum prime die 
Julii anno Domini millesimo quingentesimo tertio et anno regni 
regis Henrici septimi post conquestum Angliae decimo octavo. 

8. The Decree of the Court of Augmentations for the Reader of 

Divinity for my Lady Margaret. 

Henricus Octavus, Dei gratia Angliae, Franciae et Hibemiae 
rex, fidei defensor ac in terra ecclesiae Anglicanae et Hibernicae 
supremum caput, omnibus ad quos praesentes literae pervenerint 
salutem : Inspeximus inter recorda et irrotulamenta curiae aug- 
mentationum reventionum coronae nostrae quoddam decretum per 
Cancellarium et consilium curiae praedictae factum in haec verba. 
Memorandum : Whereas the excellent princess Margaret 
some time Countess of Richmond and Derby, now deceased, 
mother to the Right excellent Prince of famous memory Henry 
the Seventh, late King of England, father to our Sovereign Lord 
King Henry the Eighth, by licence given and granted to her by 
the said King Henry the Seventh, erected, founded, ordained 
and established one perpetual Reader of holy Theology in the 
University of Cambridge, which Reader should have yearly for 



11 

his stipend and wages £13. 6^. Sd. of lawful money of England, 
to be paid by the Abbot, Prior and Convent of the late 
Monastery of Saint Peter of Westminster and their successors, 
in consideration of certain manors, lands, tenements and other 
hereditaments freely given and granted by the said Countess 
to the said monastery, to bear and support as well the said 
stipend and wages, as also divers other charges, as by one 
book indented made between the said Countess and the said 
Abbot, Prior and Convent, bearing date the second day 
of March in the twenty-first year of the reign of the most 
excellent Prince of famous memory King Henry the Seventh 
father to our said Sovereign Lord more plainly appeareth: 
And whereas the Abbot, Prior and Convent of the said late 
Monastery after the foundation of the said Reader by their 
deed under their Convent seal hath according to their cove- 
nant and grant contained in the said book indented and accord- 
ing also to the confidence and trust put in them by the said 
Countess, granted and made sure to one John Fisher, first 
nominated Reader, and to his successors Readers for ever one 
annuity or yearly rent of £13. Gs. 8d. at the feasts of Easter and 
Saint Michael the Archangel in the said University yearly to be 
paid, with one clause of distress in the Manor of Drayton in the 
County of Middlesex and in divers other lands and tenements 
comprised in their said grant, as by their deed bearing date 
the first day of July in the eighteenth year of the reign of the 
said excellent Prince King Henry the Seventh more plainly 
appeareth, which said monastery of Saint Peter of Westminster 
with the whole possessions and revenues spiritual and temporal 
thereof is now given, surrendered and come to our Sovereign 
Lord King Henry the Eighth: Forasmuch as upon due exami- 
nation it is duly proved before the Chancellor and counsel of the 
Court of Augmentations of the revenues of our Sovereign Lord 
the King'^s Crown that the said annuity or annual rent of 
£l3. 6a. Sd. was continually paid by the Abbot and Convent of 
the said late monastery for the time being to the said Reader 
before and until the time of dissolution of the said late monas- 
tery, and because also it is the King's pleasure that the said 
Reader shall continue according to the foundation thereof; It 
is therefore ordered and decreed by the said Chancellor and 



12 

<^oun8el in the term of the Holy Trinity, that is to say, the tenth 
day of June in the thirty-fourth year of our Sovereign Lord 
King Henry the Eighth, that one William Skete, Bachelor of 
Divinity, now Reader, and his successors Readers according to 
the foundation thereof contained in the said book indented shall 
have and enjoy for ever the said annuity or annual rent of 
£13. 6a. 8d, sterling to be paid by the hands of the same 
Treasurer of the said Court of Augmentations for the time being 
of such the King's Treasure of the same Augmentations as shall 
remain in the hands of the same Treasurer at the feasts of Easter 
and Saint Michael the Archangel by even portions. And it is 
further ordered and decreed by the said Chancellor and counsel 
the said Reader shall have all the arrearage of the said annuity 
due sythen and from the feast of Saint Michael the Archangel 
in the thirty-first year of the reign of our Sovereign Lord 
King Henry the Eighth, to be paid also by the hands of the said 
Treasurer of the treasure aforesaid. 

Nos autem tenorem decreti praedicti ad requisitionem dicti 
Wyllmi duximus exemplificandum per praesentes. In cuius rei 
testimonium has literas nostras fieri fecimus patentes teste 
Ricardo Ryche milite apud Westmona^iterium vicesimo sexto 
die Junii regni nostri tricesimo quarto. 

4. An Act for confirming and rendering more effectual certain 
letters Patent of King James the First for annexing a 
Canonry and several Rectories to the Begins Professor of 
Divinity in the University of Oxford, and the Begiibs 
Professor and Lady Margarefs Reader in Divinity in the 
Univei^sity of Cambridge, (10 Anne, cap. 45.) 

Whereas our most Gracious Sovereign King James the First, 
of blessed memory, for the support and maintenance of the 
Regius Professor of Divinity in the University of Oxford, 
did, by his letters patent bearing date the ^6th day of 
August in the third year of his Reign, grant to the Chancellor, 
Masters and Scholars of the said University of Oxford, and their 
successors, all that his advowson, donation, free disposition 
and right of patronage of the Rectory of Newelme alias Ewelme 
in the County of Oxford, and the said late King James the 



13 

First, by the said letters patent, did, for himself, his heirs and 
successors, grant to the Chancellor, Masters and Scholars of the 
said University, and their successors, that the said Regius Pro- 
fessor for the time being for ever should have and enjoy one 
Prebend or Canonry within the Cathedral Church of Christ in 
Oxford of the foundation of King Henry the Eighth so long as 
he should be Regius Professor of Divinity in that University : 
And whereas the said King James the First, for the increase 
of the stipend of the Regius Professor or Reader of Divinity in 
the University of Cambridge, did, by other his letters patent of 
the same date, grant to the Chancellor, Masters and Scholars of 
the said University of Cambridge, a^d their successors, all that 
his advowson^ donation, free disposition and right of patron- 
age of the Rectory of Somersham, together with Colne and 
Pidley and other chapelries, rights, members and appurtenances 
in the County of Huntingdon : And whereas the said King 
James the First, for the increase of the stipend of the Reader 
of the Lecture of Divinity, appointed by Margaret, Countess of 
Richmond, mother to King Henry the Seventh, in the said 
University of Cambridge, did also, by the said letters patent, 
grant to the Chancellor, Masters and Scholars of the said 
University of Cambridge, and their successors, all that fiis ad- 
vowson, donation, free disposition and right of patronage of 
the Rectory of Terrington in the County of Norfolk with all 
its rights, members and appurtenances : And whereas the said 
King James the First, in and by the said several letters patent, 
did signify and declare it to be his Royal will and pleasure 
that the said Canonry and several Rectories should for ever 
thereafter be held and enjoyed by the said several Professors 
and Reader of the Lecture aforesaid for so long time as 
they respectively should continue in the said respective offices or 
places, and did thereby further signify and declare his Royal 
will and intention to be that one or more Act or Acts of 
Parliament should be obtained for that purpose, which hath never 
yet been done. 

May it therefore please your Majesty that it may be 
enacted, And be it enacted by the Queens's most excellent 
Majesty, by and with the advice and consent of the Lords Spi- 
ritual and Temporal and Commons in the present Parliament 



14 

assembled and by the authority of the same, That the said 
Canonry of Christ Church, and several Rectories of Newelme 
aiias Ewelme, Somersham and Terrington, and every of them, 
and all members, tithes, lands, tenements, hereditaments, profits 
and emoluments whatsoever to them and every of them respec- 
tively belonging or in any wise appertaining, or with the said 
Canonry and Rectories every or any of them used or enjoyed, are 
and shall hereby be united and for ever annexed unto the 
several offices or places aforesaid, and shall be held and enjoyed 
by the respective persons already placed in the said offices or 
places, and by such other person and persons as shall from time to 
time for ever hereafter be placed and put into the said offices or 
places, in as full and ample manner to all intents and purposes 
as if they were duly presented, nominated, admitted, instituted 
and inducted thereunto ; and the said respective Professors and 
Reader of the said Lecture, and their successors for the time 
being, during such time and times only as they shall continue in 
their respective offices or places, shall, by virtue of such office or 
place, for ever hereafter enjoy the said respective Canonry, and 
also shall have and hold the said Rectories without any pre- 
sentation, admission, institution or induction, or any other act 
or thii^ whatsoever to entitle them thereunto, and shall be and 
are hereby declared to be, during their continuance in their 
said respective offices or places, full and perfect Canon and 
Incumbents of the respective Canonry and Rectories aforesaid 
to all intents and purposes whatsoever; which nevertheless 
shall not be so understood as to make void any other benefice 
or benefices which the said Professors and Reader of the said 
Lecture, or any of them, is at present or shall hereafter be 
legally possessed of : it being the intention of this Act that the 
aforesaid Rectories shall consist and be held and enjoyed 
by the said Professors and Reader of the said Lecture respec-^ 
tively together with any one other ecclesiastical benefice with- 
out any license or dispensation for that end to be granted or 
obtained. 

And it is hereby further enacted and declared, That as often 
as it shall happen that any of the said offices or places shall 
become void by death, resignation or otherwise, the Canonry 
and Rectories or the Rectory to such office or place respectively 



15 

belonging, shall at the same time become void, and the person 
that shall be placed in such office or place so become void shall, 
by virtue of such office or place only, have and enjoy the Canon/y 
and Rectories or the Rectory to such office or place belonging 
for so long time as he shall continue in such office or place and 
no longer : Provided always that the said Professors shall celebrate 
Divine Service and perform all other parochial duties relating 
to the cure of souls within the said several Rectories which any 
other Rectors of the said Rectories have heretofore done and 
performed and were by law obliged to do and perform, or shall 
allow to learned and able Curates, to be licensed by the Bishop 
or Ordinary of the Diocese, who shall be constantly residing 
within the said Rectories, such competent salaries and stipends 
as the said Bishop or Ordinary shall judge i^ufficient : Provided 
also that neither this Act, nor anything therein contained, 
shall excuse or be construed to excuse the said Professors or 
Reader of the Lecture aforesaid or any of them from the pay- 
ment of firstfruits and tenths or from the payment of all 
dues of what kind soever to the Bishop or other Ordinary, who 
before the making of this Act had lawful right to claim the same, 
or from canonical obedience to the Bishop or Ordinary of their 
respective Dioceses, but every such Professor and Reader of the 
said Lecture shall be obliged to make payment thereof. 

6. Grant from Alice Davers to Samuel Ward, D.D.^ Lady 
Margarefs Reader^ and to his successors, of, a parcel of 
Ground in Cambridge. 

This Indenture, made the fourteenth day of January, in the 
first year of the reign of our Sovereign Lord Charles, by the 
grace of God King of England, Scotland, France and Ireland, 
Defender of the Faith, &c., Annoque Domini 1625, between 
Alice Davers, the relict of Jeremy Davers, late of Cambridge, 
in the County of Cambridge, Esquire, deceased, of the one 
part, and Samuel Ward, Doctor of Divinity and Reader of the 
Divinity Lecture founded in the University of Cambridge by 
Margaret, late Countess of Richmond, mother of King Henry 
the Seventh, of the other part, Witnesseth that the said Alice 
Davers, as well out of her pious disposition to advance learning 



16 

and religion^ and to encourage as well the said SamuelWard 
as his successors, Readers of the said Lecture for the time being, 
in his and their painful discharging of the duties belonging to 
the said Lecture, by adding some small means of livelihood 
towards the better maintenance of the said Samuel and of his 
said successors, as also for divers other valuable considerations 
her the said Alice thereunto specially moving, hath granted, 
bargained and sold, aliened, enfeoffed and confirmed, and by 
these presents doth fully and absolutely grant, bargain and sell, 
alien, enfeoff and confirm unto the said Samuel Ward and his 
said successors all that garden, place or parcel of ground, situate 
and being in the parish of St. Edward's in Cambridge afore- 
said between the messuage or tenement called the '^ Pheasant 
Cock " now or late in the tenure of Henry Gooch on the East,, 
and a messuage or tenement now or late in the tenure of 
Robert Pillay or of his assignee or assignees on the West, the 
North head thereof abutting on the common street leading 
from St. Benedicts Church towards the Peas-market Hill in 
Cambridge aforesaid, and the South head thereof abutting upon 
parcel of a tenement late in the occupation of Ann Ellwyn 
widow or of her assignee or assignees, which said garden, place 
or parcel of ground containeth from East to West eleven yards 
or thereabouts, and from North to South nineteen yards or there- 
abouts : To have and to hold the said garden, place or parcel 
of ground with the appurtenances and all easements, ways, 
passages, profits and commodities whatsoever to the same 
belonging, or therewith used, occupied, possessed or enjoyed, 
to the said Samuel Ward and his said successors, Readers of 
the said Divinity Lecture, to the only proper use and behoof 
of him the said Samuel and of his said successors for ever: 
And the said Alice Davers doth for herself, her heirs, executors 
and administrators covenant and grant by these presents to 
and with the said Samuel Ward and his said successors that 
she, the said Alice Davers, and her heirs and all persons claim- 
ing by, from or under her, the said Alice Davers, shall and will 
at all times within the space of seven years next ensuing the 
date of these presents, upon the reasonable request and at the 
costs and charges in the law of the said Samuel Ward or of 
his said successors, make, do, suffer, execute and knowledge all 



and every such further lawful and reasonable act and acts, 
thing and things, devise and devises, conveyance and convey- 
ances, and assurances in the law, for the further, better or 
more sure making or conveying of the said garden, place 
or parcel of ground, with the appurtenances before-mentioned 
or intended to be hereby granted, bargained and sold, aliened, 
enfeoffed and confirmed unto the said Samuel Ward and to 
his said successors, or unto any of them, as by him the said 
Samuel or his said successors, or any of them, or any of their 
counsel learned in the laws, shall be reasonablv devised or 
required, be it by fine, feoffment, recovery, deed or deeds 
inrolled, or by all or any of the said ways, or by any other 
ways or means whatsoever, so that the said further security 
contain no further warranty than against her, the said Alice 
Davers, her heirs and assignees, and that she, the said Alice, 
be not compelled for the making or doing thereof to travel 
any further than the town of Cambridge aforesaid; all which 
fine or fines and further assurance are by these presents de- 
clared, and the said parties to these presents do mutually hereby 
covenant each with other that the same shall be to the 
only use hereinbefore specified and to none other use, intent 
or purpose whatsoever. In witness whereof the said parties 
to these presents interchangeably have put their hands and 
seals the day and year first above written. 

(Signed) Alice Davers. 



18 



IT. Begins Professorships of Divinity, Hebrew and 

Greek. 

1. De officio trium Lectorum publicorum, qui in Scholia Aca- 
demiaepraelegunt, quorum unus Theologianif alter linguam 
Hehraicam^ tertius Graecam docet 

Quo quis ampliore mercede et stipendio donatas est, eo 
majorem laborem libenti animo capere debet; et propterea sta- 
tuimus et ordinamus, ut tres publici Lectores (quorum singuli 
quadraginta libras a Collegio Sanctae et Individuae Trinitatis a 
Bege Henrico Octavo, Fatre nostro charissimo, fundato in singulos 
annos recipiunt) unaquaque hebdomada cujusque termini quater 
singuli minimum legant, et Auditores semper antea de eo die quo 
legere volunt admoneant. Cupimus tamen ut singulis profestis 
diebus legant. Insuper toto magnae vacationis termino, si pestis 
non ingruerit, et tria ex praecipuis Gollegiis juventutem suam non 
rus amandarint, eos quoque legere praecipimus: praecipua Collegia 
hoc loco intelligimus, Collegium Begis, Collegium Sanctae et 
Individuae Trinitatis, Collegium Divi Johannis, et Collegium 
Christi. Et quoties singuli, vel eo termino vel reliquis tribus 
terminis, diebus praestitutis legendi officium praetermiserint, toties 
decem solidis mulctentur, qui dempti de ipsorum stipendiis in 
CoUegii usum cedant. Quod si quispiam eorum aegrotaverit, aut 
aliquii gravi causii aut negotio per Magistrum CoUegii et majorem 
partem octo Seniorum approbando impeditus fuerit, tum intra 
triduum ad summum pro se unum qui sit ad illud munus obeundum 
idoneus substituat, ut Auditorum utilitati diligenter consulatur: 
verum aliis de causis nunquam pro se quempiam substituere sub 
poena loci sui amittendi permittimus. Horas autem a Vicecan- 
cellario et Magistro dicti CoUegii cum quatuor ex octo Senioribus 
praestitutas observent. Singulisque diebus quibus legere tenentm*, 
singuli integram ferehoram praelegendoconsumant: quinetiam et 
auctores a praedictis Vicecancellario Magistro et quatuor ex octo 



19 

Senioribus dicti CoUegii designatos legant, et modam legend! 
quoque quern illi utilissdmum commodissimumque duxerint perpetuo 
teneant. Forro statuimus et yolumus, ut quotiescunque locum 
alicujus praedictorum Lectorum yacare contigerit, plenam eligendi 
potestatem habeant Vicecancellarius Academiae Cantabrigiensis, 
Magister Gollegii praedicti cum duobus maxime senioribus Sociis 
ejusdem Gollegii, quinetiam Fraepositi seu Magistri trium reli- 
quorum praecipuorum CoUegiorum, id est, CoUegii Regalis, Gol- 
legii Divi Johannis, et Gollegii Christi, et si quispiam praedictorum 
Electorum Vicecancellarius id temporis fuerit, turn sumatur ejus 
loco Magister Gollegii Beginae: qui omnes in publicis Scholis in 
unum per Yicecancellarium cum consensu Magistri Gollegii Sanctae 
et Individuae Trinitatis praedicti convocati, breve quoddam 
scriptum seu instrumentum per scribam Academiae, postridie quam 
locum yacare intellexerint, componendum curent, inque eo diem 
ad singulos eorum qui munus illud petunt diligenter examinandos 
praestituant. Hujus scripti seu instrumenti sint duo exemplaria 
descripta; quorum alterum ad ostium templi Divae Mariae prope 
forum siti, alterum ad ostium publicarum Scholarum affigatur, 
ibique utrumque ad septem dies integros stet, quo ab omnibus 
totius Academiae praedictae Studentibus intelligi possit ejusmodi 
locum yacare. Sit autem dies examinationis octayus dies post- 
quam Yicecancellario et Magistro Gollegii Sanctae et Individuae 
Trinitatis a Rege Henrico Octavo, Fatre nostro charissimo, fun- 
dati locum vacare notum fuerit. Quod si quispiam eorum qui 
tunc abfuerint ab Academia, judicio majoris partis Electorum, 
etiamsi non petat, dignissimus loco vacante videbitur, dies exami- 
nationis in eo casu tantum usque eo poterit differri, quoad com- 
mode, respectu ad loci distantiam habito, ubicunque fuerit accersiri 
queat. Et si extra Regnum Angliae fuerit, interea aliquis ad 
locum supplendum per majorem partem dictorum Electorum sur- 
rogetur, et pro rata portione stipendium habeat. Sit autem 
examinandi modus ejusmodi. Si lectura Theologica vacaverit, 
tum Theologorum singuli qui illud munus petunt, quos vel Doctores 
Theologiae, vel Baccalaureos ejusdem facultatis semper esse 
volumus, primum per facultatem Theologicam examinentur, quid 
in Scripturis Sacris intelligendis et in Sanctorum Patrum scriptis 
possint. Deinde singuli eorum qui petunt, diebus per Electores 
ad eam rem praestitutis, aliquam Scripturae partem per praedictos 

2 — 2 



20 

Electores sihi assignatam per spatium unios horae in Scholia pub- 
licis palam interpretentur. Quod si lectura Hebraica yel Graeca 
Tacaverit, singuli qui petunt in linguarum illarum cognitione 
similiter per aliquot earum linguarum peritos examinentur, et certis 
diebus partem alicujus libri aut auctoris in illis Unguis script! per 
dictos Electores assignatam per spatium unius horae, ut supra de 
lectura TheologicS dictum est, in Scholis publicis palam interpre- 
tentur. Postridie autem quam singuli hoc mode palam praelege- 
rint, praedicti Electores publicis in Scholis in unum convenientes 
jurejurando se obstrmgant, in locum ilium jam yacantem se 
neminem, yel gratia, yel munere, yel spe alicujus muneris commotos, 
sed eum quem conscientia testante maxime ad illud munus idoneum 
judicayerint electuros, semotfi omni sinistra animi affectione, prout 
sunt et Jesu Seryatori rationem in ultimo die reddituri, et 
Academiae honor! et utilitat! Studentium consulturi, Atque si 
forte contigerit yel Nos, yel quempiam ex Successoribus nostris 
aut Magnatibus hujus Begn! aliquem per literas ad ejusmodi locum 
commendare qui non sit ad eum maxime idoneus, (optimum enim 
semper Deo teste et conscientia praeficiendum cupimus,) turn 
yolumus et mandamus, ut Electores sine uUo dictarum Hterarum 
respectu praestantissimum et ad Auditores instruendos accom- 
modatissimum eligant. Quod si quispiam eorum penes quos 
eligendi potestas sit forte abfuerit, ejus locum suppleat illius 
Vicarius, eandemque auctoritatem inter eligendum habeat. Qui 
omnes inter eligendum potissimum considerent solidam doctrinam, 
yocis daritatem, pronuntiationem distinctam, et elocutionera. Et 
Socios Gollegii Sanctae et Indiyiduae Trinitatis praedicti, si modo 
caeteris qui petunt pares sint, semper praeferant. Et in quem 
major pars Electorum consenserit, is pro electo habeatur. Quod 
si Electores post tria aperta scrutinia hoc modo consentire non 
possint, tum is electus esto quem Yicecancellarius et Magister diet! 
Gollegii soli nominayerint. Et s! forte id temporis Magister diet! 
Gollegii sit Yicecancellarius, tum is sit electus quem ille et Prae- 
positus Gollegii Begalis nominayerint. At si hi duo, id est, 
Yicecancellarius et Magister diet! Gollegii, yel si dictus Magister 
Yicecancellarius sit, tum nisi dictus Magister et Fraepositus 
Gollegii Regalis de uno aliquo consenserint, is tum pro electo 
habeatur quem illius Academiae Cancellarius (si Episcopus sit) 
solus nominayerit; yerum si Cancellarius Academiae illius non sit 



I 



21 

Episcopus, turn quern Archiepiscopus Cantuariensis solus nomina- 
Terit electus esto. Qu& re confecta, electus ille per Magistrum 
dicti CoUegii Sanctae et Indiyiduae Trinitatis, simul atque jus- 
jurandum coram dicto Magistro et octo Senioribus ejusdem Col- 
legii de hoc Statuto servando dederit, admittatur. Nemo in 
locum aliquem praedictorum Lectorum unquam eligatur qui fit 
de haeresi probabiliter suspectus vel infami& notatus. Qui ad 
Lecturam Hebraicam eligetur, sit minimum vel Magister Artium, 
vel Baccalaureus Theologiae, vel Doctor ejusdem facultatis; qui 
autem ad Graecam lecturam assumetur, sit ad minimum vel 
Magister Artium, vel Baccalaureus Theologiae. Doctores omnes, 
cujuscunque facultatis fuerint, ab h&c Graeca lecturS omnino 
exdudimus. Quod si Socius Gollegii Sanctae et Individuae Tri- 
nitatis praedicti ad aliquem locum praedictorum Lectorum electus 
sit, cum primum admissus fuerit, deinceps Socii nomen solum 
teneat, et si unus sit ex numero octo Seniorum, Senioritatem illam 
quoque cubiculum suum et Sisatorem habeat: commeatu yero 
stipendio et liberaturS Socio debitis toto illo tempore quo illud 
legendi munus obit penitus careat. Caeterum si legendi munus 
deposuerit, tum sodalitium ut antea cum omnibus commoditatibus 
habeat. Insuper statuimus, ut singuli ad aliquod praedictorum 
Lectorum munus electi, cujuscunque Gollegii Socii aut Pensionarii 
fuerint (exceptis semper Gollegiorum Magistris Doctoribus et 
maritis) aut ubicunque antea habitaverint, cum primum admissi 
fuerint, in dicto Gollegio Sanctae et Indiyiduae Trinitatis, prout 
Fundatoris yoluntas postulate quamdiu munus illud exequuntur 
habitent, et Statutis ejusdem Gollegii eodem mode quo Socii 
ejusdem pareant; et omnes actus Scholasticos ad quos Socii 
tenentur obseryent, caeteraque omnia ut Socii Gollegii agant, sed 
nihil praeter stipendium Lectori debitum a dicto Gollegio reci- 
piant. Et si quispiam illorum Socius yel Pensionarius alterius 
alicujus Gollegii antea fuerit, nunquam yel in Socium yel in 
numerum octo Seniorum ejusdem Gollegii, quamdiu illud munus 
tenuerit, eligatur. Verum si munus illud yel su& sponte depo- 
suerit, aut prae morbo aut imbecillitate yirium exequi non possit, 
in Socium Gollegii, ne omni ope destituatur, per Magistrum et 
majorem partem octo Seniorum dicti Gollegii, si mode Statuta 
Gollegii in quo antea Socius fuerat permiserint, eum eligi yolumus, 
quocunque dicti Gollegii Sanctae et Indiyiduae Trinitatis Statuto 



22 

son obstante. Quod si Statuta Collegii in quo Socius fuerat non 
permiserint, turn in dicto Collegio Sanctae et Individuae Trinitatis 
non in Socium eligatur aut admittatur, sed tamen commeatum, 
atipendium, et liberaturam, caeteraque commoda babeat Socio 
dicti Collegii qui sit ejusdum gradus debita, ea lege ut Statuta 
dicti Collegii ad Socium ejusdem gradus pertinentia per omnia 
pbservet. Atque toto illo tempore quo bis commodis in dicto 
Collegio fruitur, sodalitium quod in dicto Collegio yel tunc vacat, 
vel proximo post vacabit, ne dictum Collegium quicquam damni 
inde accipiat, omnino vacare volumus et mandamus. Item singuli 
ad aliquod praedictorum Lectorum munus electi, tam Socii dicti 
Collegii quam caeteri, pro commeatu ex stipendio sibi pro lecturS 
debito sex libras quotannis dicto Collegio solvant, hoc est, ad finem 
cujuscunque anni quartae triginta solidos. Quod si aliquando 
aegrotaverint, tum yolumus ut pro singulis hebdomadis quibus 
aegrotaverint viginti denarios ex praedictis sex libris demptos 
habeant; cubiculum vero in Collegio gratis habeant. SinguU 
eorum suum legendi munus, quamdiu et illud diligenter obierint 
et ipsi Yoluerint, teneant. Yerum si quispiam eorum suum 
officium negligenter fecerit, et ter per Yicecancellarium et Magis- 
trum dicti Collegii de ea re admonitus non emendaverit; aut si 
de haeresii aut de aliquo crimine notabili, coram Vicecancellario 
et dicto Magistro legitime convictus fuerit, aut si contra fidem 
orthodoxam, aut contra Sacramenta aliquando vel locutus esse vel 
aliquid egisse deprehensus sit; aut ab Academifi amplius quadra- 
ginta dies in annos singulos abfuerit, nisi gravissima causa per 
Magistrum dicti Collegii et majorem partem octo Seniorum ejusdem 
approbanda obstiterit, Hum idem suum locum amittat, quocunque 
scripto, auctoritate, aut mandate concesso, vel in posterum conce- 
dendo, vel quScunquo dispensatione a quocunque obtentst non 
obstante. 

Nemo praedictorum Lectorum durante tempore lecturae suae 
ullum officium, magistratum, aut lecturam aliam, yel in dicto 
Collegio, yel in Academia habeat sub poenii praedict&. 

Hujus Statuti unum exemplar sit inter Statuta dicti Collegii, 
et alterum in libro de Statutis Academiae descriptum, 

. ^ The words ^' tum idem suum locum amittat*' are not in the Copy sealed by Queen 
Elizabeth, though inserted in the printed editions of the same. 



23 



2. Caroli Secundi Regis Literae patentes. 

De tribtis publicia Lectoribus. 

Carolus Sbcundus, Dei gratia Angliae^ Scotiae, Franciae et 
Hiberniae Rex Fidei Defensor, etc. Dilecto nobis in Christo 
Henrico Feme S. Theologiae Professori, Academiae Cantabr: 
Procancellario pro tempore existenti et CoUegii nostri Sanctae 
et Individuae Trinitatis in eadem Universitate Magistro, necnon 
reliquis trium Lectorum publicorum ex Fundatione Regis Henrici 
Octayi Electoribus; omnibus etiam aliis ad quos infra scripta 
ullo modo spectare poterint, salutem. 

Cum inter statuta dicti CoUegii et in libro de statutis 
Academiae certum quoddam statutum sub hoc titulo habeatur 
viz.: " De officio trium Lectorum publicorum'' quorum unus 
Theologiam, alter linguam Hebraicam, tertius Graecam docet, in 
quo statute inter caetera hae clausulae seu sententiae hisce verbis 
subsequentibus continentur, viz. *' Quod si socius Sanctae et 
Individuae Trinitatis Collegii praedicti ad aliquem locum prae* 
dictorum Lectorum electus sit, quamprimum admissus fuerit^ 
deinceps socii nomen solum teneat/' et paucis interjectis haec 
insuper " Statuimus ut singuli ad aliquod praedictorum Lectorum 
munus electi cujuscunque Collegii Socii aut Pensionarii fuerinti 
aut ubicunque habitaverint, quamprimum admissi fuerint, in dicto 
Collegio Sanctae et Individuae Trinitatis quamdiu munus illud 
exequentur, habitent." Porro de stipendio tribus hisce Prae- 
lectoribus assignato et de labore seu penso iis injuncto idem 
statutum statim ab initio haec habet: " Statuimus ut tres publici 
Lectores quorum singuli quadraginta libras a Collegio Sanctae et 
Individuae Trinitatis a Rege Henrico Octavo fundato in singulos 
annos recipiant, unaquaque hebdomada cujuscunque termini 
quater singuli ad minimum legant, insuper toto magnae vaca- 
tions termino, si pestis non ingruerit et tria ex praecipuis Col- 
legiis in Academia juventutem non rus amandaverint, eos quoque 
legere praecipimus et quoties singuli vel ex termino vel reliquis 
terminis diebus praestitutis legendi officium praetermiserinti 
toties decom solidis mulctentur, qui dempti de ipsorum stipen- 
diis in Collegii usum cedant.'' Jam vero ex diversorum et fide 



24 

dignorum, quibos dicti CoUegii et Academiae status satis perspec- 
tus et lectioQum in scholis habendarum ratio probe cognita est, 
relatione accepimus dictam stipendium amplum licet et magni- 
ficum in prim& fondatione quam sit exile pront nunc dierum 
fert nummorum aestimatio, labor vero quam sit gravis et onus 
yix ferendum prout nunc obtinet legendi modus in scholis 
usitatus: Nos igitur hominum Academicorum, praesertim pub- 
licorum in Academic Professorum, commodis prospicere cupientes 
ex suprem& nostra regia potestate, certa scientia et mero motu, 
dictas clausulas sen sententias superius a nobis recensitas annul- 
lamus et cassamus in quantum concernunt praescriptum ilium 
numerum lectionum et sodalitii amissionem; et quo aequior sit 
inter mercedem et laborem proportio, statuimus quod socius dicti 
nostri Collegii si electus sit in Lectorem Linguae Hebraicae 
vel Graecae (nam Theologiae Professorem excipimus propter 
annexum satis opimum Sacerdotium) non tenebitur ex hoc tem- 
pore sodalitium suum deponere, sed eo gaudebit cum omnibus 
suis emolumentis ; et nominatim Isaaco Barrow Linguae Graecae 
Lectori publico jam constitute licebit socii locum tenere eoque 
cum omnibus suis privilegiis et emolumentis gaudere et frui. 
Quod si alius cujuscunque Collegii socius electus fuerit, non 
tenebitur in dicto nostro CoUegio Sanctae et Individuae Trinitatis 
habitare mode per statuta sui Collegii possit et a Praefecto 
atque sociis ejusdem Collegii ei permissum fuerit retinere suum 
sodalitium ejusque emolumenta una cum Lectura ilia public^ ad 
quam ascitus est. 

Laborem yero quod attinet et pensum trium praedictorum 
Lectorum, statuimus ut bis tantum in unaquaque hebdoinada idque 
solum inter trium terminorum spatia legere teneantur ; Diebus 
vero praestitutls si officium legendi praetermiserint decem solidis 
toties quoties mulctentur, ut supra dictum est. Denique sta- 
tuimus ut praedicti Lectores quibus nostra hac indulgentia 
permissum est sodalitium una cum Lectura retinere, si promo- 
tionem ecclesiasticam, puta Praebendam vel aliam quamvis sine 
cura animarum (nam Sacerdotium, Decanatum et Archidiaco- 
natum excipimus) obtinuerint, non teneantur in eo casu sodalitium 
amittere quocunque Collegii statute non obstante. Reliqua 
autem omnia et singula quae in dicto statute " De Officio trium 
Lectorum Publicorum" continentur, pristinum suum robur et 



25 

firmitatem volumos habere. In cujus rei testimonium has 
literas nostras fieri fecimus patentes. Teste me ipso apud 
Westmonasterium octavo die Aprilb anno Regni nostri tertio 

decimo. ^ 

Per ipsum Regem. 

HASTINGS. 
3. Statute, 10 Anne, c. 45. See page 12. 

4. Statute, 3 & 4 Vict. c. 113. 

Sect. 12. And be it enacted that, so soon as conveniently 
may be, and by the authority hereinafter provided, the two 
Ganonries in the Chapter of the Cathedral Church of Ely, which 
shall be secondly and thirdly vacant, shall bo permanently annexed 
and united to the llegius Professorships of Hebrew and Greek 
respectively in the University of Cambridge. 

Sect. 70. And be it enacted that, so soon as conve- 
niently may be, and by the like authority, arrangements may be 
made to enable the University of Cambridge, if they shall so 
think fit, to sell the advowsons of the benefices annexed to the 
Regius Professorship of Divinity in the said University or any 
of them, and to invest the proceeds of any such sale in proper 
securities, with a provision for the payment of the interest and 
annual profits thereof to the Regius Professor of Divinity for the 
time being; and that upon the completion of the sale of any such 
advowson the existing incumbent of the benefice shall be at 
liberty, upon resigning the same, to receive such interest and 
annual profits. 



26 



III. Sir Thomas Adams' Professorship of Arabic. 

1. Letters Patent of King Charles the Second. 

Carolus Secundus, Dei Gratia, Angliae, Scotiae, Franciae, 
et Hiberniae Rex, Fidei Defensor, &c. Omnibus et singulis 
has literas visuris salutem : 

Com ex parte dilecti ac fidelis subditi nostri Thomae Adams 
Militis et Baronetti Ciyitatisque Londinensis Aldermanni nobis 
innotuerit ipsum dictum Thomam Adams e^ propenso in Acade- 
miam nostram Cantabrigiensem et in rem literariam affectu Pro- 
fessoris seu Lectoris linguae Arabicae munus in eddem Academic 
instituisse ac unum annualem reditum quadraginta librarum in 
annuum hujusmodi Professoris seu Lectoris stipendium vel sala- 
riam exeuntem de domo Dominicali de Chawreth alias Chawrey 
et diversis terris et tenementis in parochia de Broxted in Comi- 
tatu Essexiae dedisse ; necnon in dicti muneris meliorem Consti- 
tutionem et Executionem debitam adhibito Procancellarii Prae- 
fectorumque in eadem Academic Collegiorum Consilio ordinationes 
quasdam constituisse eo conducentes in his verbis sequentibus. 
Statue itaque imprimis ordinoque, quod perpetuis futuris tem- 
poribus praedictus annualis reditus integre cedet in subsidium 
et praemium Professoris seu Lectoris linguae Arabicae mode 
infra dicendo et sub conditionibus mox expresse tradendis electi 
atque constituti. Quod officium attinet dicti Professoris Arabici 
ut hujus linguae qua publico qua privatim cognoscendae ratio 
habeatur: volo statuoque ut dictus Professor teneatur singulis 
intra unius cuj usque termini Academici spatium septimanis semel 
aut linguae Arabicae rudimenta tradere aut Authorem aliquem 
in ea lingua praeclarum exponere per unius circiter horae spatium 
loco et tempore a Procancellario assignandis sub poena decern 
solidorum pro singula lectione omissa ex stipendio ipsi debito per 
Procancellarium subtrahendorum ac Bibliothecae Academiae pro 
coemendis Orientalis linguae libris applicandorum nisi ex gravi 
corporis infirmitate officio suo satisfacere non poterit. Teneatur 
porro per singulas extra terminum hebdomadas si in Academic 
praesens fuerit duabus horis unius diei a Procancellario praesti- 
tuendis omnibus ilium consulturis vacare liberum adeuntibus 



27 

aperto cubiculo acceasum praebere adipiscendae excolendaeye 
linguae Arabicae cognitioni operam dantium stadia dirigere et 
conatus adjuvare. Quoram aliquid si ultro neglexerit corripiatur 
a Procancellario et si de neglecto officio saepius admonitus neu- 
tiquam se emendaverit poenam incurrat intolerabili negligentiae 
inferius decretam. Quod autem personam et qualitatem Pro- 
fesBoris hujus Arabici spectat volo et injungo ut qui huic provin- 
ciae admoretur sit vir bonae famae et conversationis bonestae 
ad miQimnm Magister Artium probe eruditus et linguarum 
Orientalium praecipae Arabicae peritia instructus et quinuUo 
alio professionis aut lecturae loco seu officio gaudeat (nisi forte 
ante admissionem deponere yoluerit). Inter autem personas ita 
eUgibiles caeteris paribus praeferri volo Praefectos CoUegiorum 
dein CoUegiorum Socios, exin Magistros Artium Academiae 
gremiales. Ejus autem nominandi et eligendi jus et potestas 
esto penes meipsum quamdiu vixero; postea vero perpetuis 
futuris temporibus ejus eligendi potestas sit penes Procancella- 
rium et Praefectos omnium CoUegiorum vel Uiam partem Prae* 
fectorum qui electioni interfuerint. £t peragatur tunc electio 
in hunc modum postquam Arabici Professoris locum qudcunque 
ex caussl vacare contigerit Procancellario incumbet quam cito 
fieri poterit Schedula Scholarum pubUcarum ostio per octo dies 
continues affixa tum de dictd vacatione tum de tempore ad futu- 
ram electionem destinato significare (tempus autem electionis 
ultra trigesimum a prima significatione diem extrahi nolo). Quo 
tempore dicti Electores pubUcis in ScboUs in unum congregati 
juramento semet ipsos obstringant seposito omni private respectu 
affectuque sinistro se nominaturos vel saltem sue comprobaturos 
suffiragio quern conscientil^ teste ex petitoribus vel ex his qui ab 
Electorum quoUbet nominantur maxime secundum praenotatas 
qualitates et Umitationes idoneum censuerint ad id munus obeun- 
dum. Is yero in quern plura suffragia conspiraverint pro electo 
babeatur. Quod si duobus forte yel pluribus paria obyenerint 
suffragia, ProcanceUario jus erit unum ex Ulis qui aUo yel aliis 
(si quando id contigerit) plura et inter se paria obtinuerint pro 
sue arbitratu eligendi. Electus autem proximo opportune tem- 
pore admittatur a Procancellario, praestito ante admissionem 
suam juramento se munus Professoris Arabici a Tboma Adams 
MUite et Baronetto in bac Academic instituto juxta Ordinationes 



28 

et Statuta officium suum concernentia pro suo virili fideliter 
executurum. Denique quo praedictus Professor intra debitos 
honestatis atque modestiae terminos contineatur neque de ull& 
criminum ultra admissorum impuoitate praesumat, statuo atque 
decerno ut si dictus Professor convictus fuerit vel propria con- 
fessione vel per idoneos testes vel per evidentiam facti de crimine 
aliquo graviore (puta de laesa majestate, haeresi, schismate, 
homicidio voluntario, furto notabili, adulterio, fomicatione, per- 
jurio,) yel si intolerabiliter negligens fuerit, neque poenis supe- 
rius expressis poterit emendari, vel su& lecture minime contentus 
alium professionis aut lecturae locum obtinuerit, per Procancelia- 
rium et CoUegiorum praefectos yel majorem eorum partem a sua 
amoyeatur professione, sine spe regrediendi aut commodum ali- 
quod ulterius percipiendi. Quod si senio^ morbo diuturno, aut 
incurabili impotentia seu debilitate corporis yel animi fractus suae 
professionis Officio mode et formd praedictis praestando non 
suffeceriti abrogetur ei professio per Procancellarium et dictos 
Praefectos yel majorem eorum partem; hoc tantum adhibito 
moderamine ut illi sic a professionis munere non su& culp& di- 
misso (si tempore professionis suae laudabiliter se gesserit neque 
alias ipsi de proprio ad yalorem quadraginta librarum annuatim 
proyisum fuerit) tertia pars stipendii remaneat usque ad mortem 
suam ; reliquis partibus successor sit tantisper contentus inte- 
grum post ejus mortem percepturus. Quas quidem ordinationes 
omnes et singulas cum praedictus Thomas Adams a nobis suppli- 
citer orayerit authoritate nostra regia stabilitas iri et ratificatas ; 
Nos Academiae commodo juxta ac studiorum profectui consultum 
cupientes yotoque dicti Thomae Adams benigne annuentes, im- 
primis omnes Ordinationes istas ab eodem Thoma Adams confec- 
tas regia nostra potestate sancimus et confirmamus; eisque 
omnibus et singulis plenum obsequium deberi atque praestari 
yolumus et mandamus. Deinde Procancellario Academiae prae« 
dictae potestatem impertimus juramentum exigendi et adminis- 
trandi tam illis qui per dictas ordinationes eligendi jus obtinent 
quam Professori electo et mox admittendo juxta sensus in dictis 
Ordinationibus expresses atque praescriptos. In cujus rei tes- 
timonium has literas nostras fieri fecimus patentes. Teste me 
ipso apud Westmonasterium quarto die Julii anno regni nostri 
decimo octayo. 



29 



2. Extract from the Will of the Rev, John Palmer, B,D. 

late Fellow of St John's College. 

I oiVB the UniYorsity of Cambridge the sum of one thousand 
pounds sterling for the perpetual augmentation of Sir Thomas 
Adams' Professorship of Arabic, subject to the following condi- 
tions : — 

First, that the Professor shall provide a book in which, at 
the end of every public Lecture, each Student of that language 
shall write his name and College with his own hand ; 

Second, that the Vice-chancellor, whenever application shall 
be made to him for the payment of this augmentation, shall 
inspect the said book and satisfy himself that the Professor has 
fulfilled bond fide the duties enjoined by the oath of his 
admission ; 

Third, that the Vice-Chancellor, if he be not satisfied that 
the Professor has fulfilled his duties as aforesaid, shall not pay 
this augmentation for that year, but shall retain the same and all 
other augmentations forfeited in the same manner until the sums 
so accruing can be invested conveniently from time to time in the 
Public Funds for the further perpetual augmentation of the 
same Professorship. 



30 



ly. LccASiAN Professorship of Mathematics. 

1. Deed of Foundation, 

Omnibus Christi fidelibus ad quos hoc praesens scriptum 
peryenerit Robertus Baworth de Grayes Inn in Gomitatu 
Middlesexiae, Armiger et Thomas Buck de Gantabrigid in comi- 
tatu Gantabrigiae Armiger, Executores ultimi Testamenti dig- 
nissimi Viri, Hbnrici Lucas de London Armigeri, nuper 
defunctii Salutem in Domino Sempiternam. Sciatis, quod cum 
praedictus yenerabilis et consultus vir Henricus Lucas Armiger 
ex prepense sue in Academiam Gantabrigiensem, et in rem 
literariam affectu a praefatis Boberto Baworth, et Thom& Buck, 
Executoribus suis, terras comparari ad valorem centum librarum 
annuatim supremo testamento mandayerit, in annuum Frofessoris, 
sen Lectoris Mathematicarum Scientiarum in dict& Academic 
stipendium yel salarium perpetuo cessuras, sub ejusmodi con- 
stitutionibus et regulis, quas Executores sui, adhibito Procan- 
cellarii et Praefectorum Collegiis dictae Academiae consilio, 
tam honori magni istius corporis, quam hujusce literaturae, omni 
hactenus praemio destitutae, incremento ac promotioni judi- 
caverint summopere accommodatas ; Nos praedicti Executores, 
pro ratione fidei nobis commissae de exequendS praeclari Be- 
nefactoris voluntate soliciti, rogato prius et impetrato dictorum 
Procancellarii et Praefectorum consilio, habitoque ad id con- 
silium praecipuo respectu, ordinationes infra scriptas, promoven- 
disistis studiis Mathematicis, uti arbitramur, apprime conducentes, 
approbamus, omnique per dictum Henrici Lucas testamentum 
nobis concess& authoritate ratas volumus et declaramus. 

Itaque statuimus imprimis et ordinamus, quod perpetuis 
futnris temporibus quicquid annui reditus (deductis necessariis 
expensis,) ex praenotatis terris ad usum praedictum acquisitis 
yel acquirendis quScunque justa ratione accreverit, id integre 
cedet in subsidium et praemium Professoris Mathematici, mode 
infra dicendo, et sub conditionibus mox exprimendis electi, et 
constituti. 



31 

Quod officium attinet dicti Professoris Mathematici, ut horum 
studiorum, qua publico, qua priyatim, excolendorum ratio ha- 
beaiur, Tolumus et statuimus ut dictus Professor teneatur singulis 
intra uniuscujusque termini Academici spatium septimanis semel 
ad minus aliquam Geometriae, Arithmeticae, Astronomiae, Geo* 
graphiae, Opticae, Staticae, aut alterius alicujus Mathematicae 
disciplinae partem (pro suo arbitratu, nisi aliter expedire Fro- 
cancellario visum fuerit) per unius circiter horae spatium legere 
atque exponere, loco et tempore a Procancellario assignandis 
sub poeoS quadraginta solidorum pro singula lectione omissd, 
ex stipendio ipsi debito per Frocancellarium subtrahendorum, et 
Bibliothecae Academicae, pro coemendis libris, vel instrumentis 
Mathematicis, applicandorum ; nisi ex gravi corporis infirmitate 
officio suo satisfacere non poterit. Quam tamen excusationem 
nolumus ultra tres septimanas yalere, ut nisi elapsis tribus sep- 
timanis alium substituat idoneum Lectorem, Procancellarii judicio 
approbandum, sciat sibi pro qualibet lectione praetermissd yi- 
ginti solidos de stipendio suo per Procancellarium subtrahendos, 
et Usui praedicto applicandos. Quo autem dictus Professor ad 
munus hoc legendi non perfunctorie praestandum efficacius as- 
tringatur, praestiti fideliter ab ipso officii certius extet indicium, 
et studiorum praesentium frnctus quadantenus etiam ad posteros 
derivetur, statuimus ut dictus Professor semel quotannis, proximo 
ante festum Sancti Michaelis non pauciorum quam decem ex illis 
quas praecedente anno publico habuerit, Lectionum exemplaria 
nitide descripta Procancellario exhibeati in publicis Academiae 
archiyis asseryanda; quod si ante tempus praescriptum facere 
neglexerit, eo usque careat stipendio suo, donee effectum det, et 
quanta fuerit rata portio temporis postea elapsi, usque dum id 
perfecerit, tantam Beditus sui yel salarii annul partem Pro- 
cancellario teneatur exsolyere, Bibliothecae Academicae ad usus 
praedictos applicandam. Quinetiam decernimus, ut dictus Pro- 
fessor teneatur duobus per singulas cujusque termini hebdomadas 
a Procancellario praestituendis diebus, unoquo extra terminum 
die, quandocunque dictus Professor in Academic praesens fuerit, 
per duas horas itidem praefigendas omnibus ilium consulturis 
yacare, liberum adeuntibus aperto cubiculo accessum praebere, 
circa propositas ipsi quaestiones, et difficultates baud grayate 
respondere; in eum finem globes et alia idonea instrumenta 



32 

Mathematica penes se in promptu habere. Inque omnibus ad 
illad propositum spectantibus studiosorum pro sust virili* conatus 
adjuvare : quorum aliquod si ultro neglexerit, corripiatur a 
Procancellario, et si de neglecto officio saepius admonitus neuti- 
quam se emendaverit, poenam incurrat intolerabilis negligentiae 
inferius decretam. 

Porro ut horum observatio fortius muniatur, et ne quis ex 
dicti Professoris absentia oboriatur neglectus, statuimus ne dictus 
Professor intra praefinita terminorum intervalla Academia ex- 
cedat, aut alibi extra Academiam per sex dies continuos mo- 
retur, nisi gravissimS de causS per Procancellarium approbanda, 
idque petitd prius et impetratd a Procancellario Tenia : sin fecerit 
secus, quanta fuerit rata portio temporis ab egressu suo praeter- 
lapsi, tanta salarii sui parte penitus excidat. Quod si forte 
diutioris ab Academia absentiae, quae dimidii termini spatium 
excedat, causa accident necessaria, Procancellarii, et duorum (qui 
CoUegiorum Praefecti fuerint) seniorum Doctorum judicio ap- 
probata, aliquem interea idoneum substituat, qui suo loco legat, et 
reliquis muniis fungatur mode supradicto, et sub poena consimili. 

Quinimo pari causa, ne dictus Professor ab officii sui debits 
executione distrahatur, nolumus omnino et prohibemus, ut is ullst 
quavis Ecclesiastical promotione gaudeat, quae animarum sibi 
euram adnexam habeat, aut residentiam exigat hisce statutis ad- 
versantem ; sub poena amissionis, ipso facto, omnis Juris, quod 
in hsLc sttS professione praetendere valeat. 

Quoad personam vero et qualitatem Mathematici Professoris, 
volumus et injungimus, ut qui huic provinciae admovetur, sit vir 
bonae famae, et conversationis honestae, ad minimum Magister 
Artium, probe eruditus, et Mathematicarum praesertim scien- 
tiarum peritid instructus. Ejus autem nominandi, et eligendi 
jus ac potestas esto penes nos praedictos Executores venerabilis 
viri Henrici Lucas, durante nostrd utriusque vitd, aut uno su^ 
premum diem obeunte, penes alterum e nobis, qui in vitd super- 
stes permanserit. Postea vero perpetuis futuris temporibus ejus 
eligendi plena potestas sit penes Procancellarium, et Praefectos 
omnium CoUegiorum dictae Academiae, vel illam partem Prae- 
fectorum, qui electioni interfuerint, et peragatur tunc electio 
in hunc modum. Postquam Mathematici Professoris locum qud- 
cunque ex causa vacare contigerit, Procancellario incumbet quam 



y 



\ 



cito fieri poterit, schedule scholarum publicarum ostio per octo 
dies continaos a&x&, cum de dict& vacatione, turn de tempore 
ad faturam electionem destinato significare (tempus autem elec- 
tionis ultra trigesimum a prima significatione diem extrahi no- 
lumus) quo'tempore dicti electores publicis in scholis in unum 
congregati juramento semetipsos obstringant, seposito omni pri- 
vato respectu, affectuque sinistro, se nominaturos, et suo com- 
probaturos suffragio quem, conscientia teste, ex petitoribus, (vel 
ex iis qui ab electorum quolibet nominantur) maxime secundum 
praenotatas qualitates idoneum censuerint ad id munus obeun- 
dum ; is vero, in quem plura suffragia oonspiraverint, pro electo 
habeatur: quod si duobus forte yel pluribus paria obyenerint 
suffragia, Procancellario jus erit unum ex illis, quialiis(si quando 
id contigerit) plura et inter se paria suffragia obtinuerint, pro 
suo arbitrio eligendi. Electus autem proximo opportune tempore 
admittator a Procancellario, praestito ante admissionem jura- 
mento se munus Professoris Mathematici a dignissimo yiro Hen- 
rico Lucas in hko Academia institutum juxta ordinationes et 
Statuta officium suum concernentia, pro suo posse fideliter ex- 
ecuturum. Denique, quo praedictus Professor intra debitos 
honestatis atque modestiae limites contineatur, neque de ullfi 
criminum ultro admissorum impunitate praesumat, statuimus ac 
decernimus, ut si dietus Professor convictus fuerit vel proprifi 
confessione, vel per testes idoneos, vel per evidentiam facti de 
crimine aliquo graviore (puta de laes^ Majestate, haeresi, schis- 
inate, homicidio voluntario, furto notabili, adulterio, fornicatione, 
perjurio) vel si intolerabiiiter negligens fuerit, neque poenis 
Buperius expressis poterit emendari, per Procancellarium et 
Collegiorum Praefectos (vel majorem eorum partem) a sua amo- 
veatur Professione, sine spe regrediendi, aut commodum aliquod 
ulterius percipiendi. Quod si senio, morbo diuturno, aut incura- 
bili impotentifi, seu debilitate corporis vei animi fractus, suae 
Frofessioni (mode et form& praedictis) perficiendae non suffecerit, 
abrogetur ei Professio per Procancellarium et dictos Praefectos 
(vel majorem eorum partem) hoc tantum adhibito moderamine, 
ut illi (sic a Professionis munere non su& culp& dimisso) si 
tempore Professionis suae laudabiliter se gesserit, neque alias 
ipse de proprio ad valorem centum librarum annuatim prbyisum 
fuerit, tertia para stipendii remaneat usque ad mortem suam ; 

3 



84 

reliquis p^urtibus successor sit tantisper contentus, integrum post 
ejus mortem percepturus. In cujus rei testimonium nos praefati 
Bobertus Rawortb et Tbomas Buck sigilla nostra praesentibus 
apposuimus. Dat. 19 die Decembris Anno Begni Domini nostri 
Caroli Secundi Dei gratia Angliae, Scotiae, Franciae, et Hiber- 
niae, Regis, Fidei Defensoris &c. decimo quinto, Annoque 
Domini 1663. 

2. Grant of King Charles II. (1664). 

• 

Carolub Sbcundus, Dei gratia Angliae, Scotiae, Franciae, 
et Hiberniae Bex, Fidei Defensor &c. Omnibus et singulis has 
Uteras visuris salutem. Cum per dilectos nostros Bobbrtum 
Baworth, et Thomam Buck Armigeros Executores ultimae 
yoluntatis consuiti viri Henrici Lucas Armigeri nuper defuncti 
innotuerit nobis dictum Henricum Lucas in rei literariae be- 
neficium Professoris Matbematici munus in Academia nostra 
Cantabrigiensi instituisse; nee non dictis iisdem Executoribus 
suis, adhibito Procancellarii et Praefectorum CoUegiis dictae 
Academiae consilio, quae ad dicti muneris commodam constitu- 
tionem, ac executionem debitam sibi ex usu yiderentur, ordinandi 
euram commendasse : £t cum dicti executores pro ratione fidei 
GFibi commissae, rogato prius et impetrato praedictorum Procan- 
oellarii, et Praefectorum consilio, ordinationes quasdam fecerint 
eo conduoentes, quas a nobis suppliciter oraverint authoritate 
nostr& regis stabilitas iri et ratificatas. Item cum dicti Execu- 
tores de praedicto munere ulterius bene mereri studentes, juxta 
consilium praedictorum, Procancellarii et Praefectorum, per sanc- 
tionem quoque nostram Regiam dicti Professoris lectionibus publico 
habendis certos ex Academicis auditores assignari ; ab Electoribus 
dicti Professoris et ab Electo Professore juramentum exigendi 
potestatem fieri ; dicto Professori, si Gollegii cujusvis socius 
fuerit, spdalitii sui una cum dicto Professoris loco retinendi pri- 
vilegium indulgeri ; et si ante susceptum hoc munus socius non 
fuerit, ut postea in socium eligi possit, facultatem concedi ; eun- 
demque demum Professorem a muneribus quibusdam publicis 
pbeundis eximi ac prohiberi a nobis itidem supplices efflagita- 
Terint; Nob dictae Academiae commodo juxta ac studiorum 
profectui consultum cupientes, dictorumque yotis Executorum 



35 

blBnigne annuentes, imprimis ordinationes istas a praedictis Exe- 
cutoribus confectas BegiS nostrS poiestate sancimos et confirma- 
xnus, iisque omnibus et singulis plenum obsequium deberi atquo 
praestari volumus et mandamus. Item lectionum, quas secundum 
ordinationes praedictas Professor Mathematicus habere tenetur, 
auditores esse volumus non-graduatos omnes post annum secun- 
dum, et Artium Baccalaureos omnes usque ad annum tertium sub 
e&dem poen&, cui per statuta Academica obnoxii sunt a reliquis 
publicis Lecturis absentes. Quiuetiam Procanoellario potestatem 
impertimus juramentum exigendi et adminbtrandi tam illis, qui 
per dictas ordinationes eligendi jus obtinent, quam Professori 
electo et mox admittendo, juxta sensus in dictis ordinationibus 
expresses, atque praesoriptos. Porro volumus et statuimus, ut 
dictus Professor eligi possit in socium cujusvis oollegii non vetanta 
professione b\x& ; et ne is sodalitio sue, si quod ante susceptum 
hoc munus obtinuit^ aut postea obtinebit, vel ullis sodalitii sui 
^molumentis aut priyUegiis eo tantum nomine, seu causS pri^ 
vetur, quovis cujusounque collegii statute non obstante. No- 
lumus denique et prohibemus, ut praediotus Professor Decani, 
Tbesaurarii, Seneschalli, aut Lectoris cujusvis in sue coUegio 
munus oapessat, aut ut inibi Tutorem se gerat (nisi I^obilium 
forte vel generosorum sociis commensalium) vel ut Procuratoris, 
Taxatoris, aut alterius cujusUbet lectoris publicum in Academia 
of&oium sustineat, sab poena amissionis ipso facto omnis juris, 
quod in bac sua professione praetendere valeat. Quapropter et 
dictum Professorem ab omnibus et singulis muneribus istis 
praedictis liberatum volumus et exemptum. In cujus rei testi-^ 
monium has literas nostras fieri fecimus patentes. Teste meipso 
apud Westmonasterium decimo octavo die Januarii, Anno regni 
nostri decimo quinto. 

Per breve de private sigillo, 

HASTINGS. 

3. Grant of King Charles IL (1666). 

Garolus Sbcundus, Dei Gratia Angliae, Scotiae, Franciae et 
Hiberniae Rex, Fidei Defensor, etc. Onmibus et singulis has 
literas visuris salutem. Cum munus Professoris Mathematici in 
Academia nostra Cantabrigiensi a consulto viro Henrico Lucas 

3—2 



36 

non ita pridem institutum authoritate nostra regia et literis 
patentibus stabiliverimus, et ordinationes ad idem munus spec- 
tantes raticaverimus, et ad petitionem executorum cum consilio 
Procancellarii et Praefectorum privilegia insuper nonnulla eidem 
Professori Mathematico in perpetaum concesserimus; inter quae 
statuimus ut dictus Professor eligi possit in socium cujusyis Col- 
legii non vetante Professione sua, et ne is sodalitio suo, si quod 
ante susceptum hoc munus obtinuit aut postea obtinebit, vel uUis 
sodalitii sui emolumentis aut privilegiis eo tantum nomine seu 
causa privetur quovis cujuscunque Collegii statute non obstante. 
Quod privilegium ea intentione illi indulsimus ut eidem Professori 
liceret quodvis sodalitium capessere et retinere. Quod ut debitum 
sortiatur effectum nee restrictioni alicui in damnum aut praeju- 
dicium ejusdem Professoris pateat indulgentia nostra; insuper 
Tolumus et statuimus ut verba nostra praedicta in favorem dicti 
Professoris semper accipiantur, ut non eo tantum sed nee alio 
quovis nomine aut causa sodalitio suo aut ejus emolumento privetur 
nisi quod quemlibet ejusdem Collegii socium cujuscunque profes- 
sionis et ordinis merito privare debeat. Et speciatim volumus 
et ordinamus ut ordines sacros non nisi ipse voluerit, suscipiat, 
nee ob defectum sacrorum ordinum sodalitio cedere ipse teneatur 
aut ab aliis quibusvis cogatur, sed ea immunitate quamdiu suo 
munere fungitur gaudeat et fruatur quo quilibet socius Medicinae 
aut Juri civili vel canonico dicatus frui solet quovis cujuscunque 
Collegii Statute aut consuetudine vel interpretatione quacunque 
non obstante. In cujus rei testimonium has literas nostras fieri 
fecimus patentes. Teste me ipso apud Westmonasterium vicesimo 
die Aprilis, Anno Begni nostri vicesimo septimo. 

Per breve de private sigillo, 

PIGOTT. 



37 



y. Enightbrxdob Pkofessorship of Moral Theoloqt. 

Indenture made under authority of the Court of Chancery, 

1847. 

This Indenture, made the fourth day of June, one thousand 
eight hundred and forty-seven, between Frederick James Fuller, 
of Garlton-chambers, Regent-street, in the city of Westminster, 
Gentleman, of the first part; the Reverend William Whewell, 
Doctor of Divinity, Master of Trinity College in the University 
of Cambridge and Professor of Casuistry in the same University 
of the second part; and the Reverend Ralph Tatham, Doctor o# 
Divinity, Master of St John's College in the University of Cam- 
bridge, the Reverend Alfred Ollivant, Doctor of Divinity, Regius 
Professor of Divinity in the same University, the Reverend John 
James Blunt, Bachelor of Divinity, Lady Margaret's Professor of 
Divinity in the same University, and Henry James Sumner 
Maine, Doctor of Laws, Regius Professor of Civil Law in the 
same University of the third part. Whereas the Reverend John 
Knightbridge, formerly of Spofforth, in the County of York, 
Doctor of Divinity, made his last Will in writing, dated the 
eleventh day of October, one thousand six hundred and seventy- 
3even, and thereby (amongst other things) gave and devised in 
the words following (that is to say) " I give unto the Master and 
Fellows of Peterhouse in Cambridge, as Feoffees in trust and 
upon the conditions afterwards expressed, all that my fee-farm 
rent issuing out of the Manor of Heslington near York, as also 
an House in the Minories, whereof one Cook is now my tenant, 
as also seven pounds per annum out of the Lands I have lying 
in Chesterford, known by the name of Little Winters. All these 
I give unto the ssud Master and Fellows, upon condition that they 
pay unto a Professor of Moral Theology or Casuistical Divinity 



S8 

the Bum of fifty pounds yearly, provided always that the Professor 
aforesaid be chosen by the yice-Chancellor of Cambridge for the 
time being, the Begins and Margaret Professors, and the Master of 
Peterhouse for the time being, and if it should happen that there 
should be discord in the election (that is to say) two for one and 
two for another, then the Master of Peterhouse shall have the 
casting voice; and my Will is that the Professor so to be chosen 
shall be of the age of fifty years, and Doctor or at least Bachelor 
in Divinity, and my Will is that the Professor so chosen shall read 
five Latin Lectures in the Public Schools of Cambridge in every 
term, and shall at the end of every term exhibit a copy of the 
said five Lectures fairly written to the Vice-Chancellor for the 
time being, to be either printed or kept in the Public Library of 
the University as shall be thought meet. And liiy Will is that 
if the Professor so chosen shall neglect to read any of the said 
five Lectures every term, without some reasonable cause to be 
approved of in writing under the hands of the major part of the 
said Electors, then it shall be lawful for the Master and Fellows of 
Peterhouse to withdraw the said maintenance to their own use 
till the said Professor do read the said Lectures as is above 
directed." And whereas the said fee-farm rent issuing out of the 
Manor of Heslington aforesaid was an annual rent of twenty-six 
pounds sixteen shillings and three-pence, and the said House in the 
Minories was then let at the yearly rent of sixteen pounds, which 
two sums together with the said rent-charge of seven pounds made 
up the total sum of forty-nine pounds sixteen shilUngs and three- 
pence per annum, being less by three shillings and nine-pence 
than the annual sum of fifty pounds so directed to be paid to the 
Professor as aforesaid: And whereas the said Testator afterwards 
made three several Codicils to his said Will, all bearing date the 
second day of December, one thousand six hundred and seventy- 
seven, by the first of which he gave to his brother Anthony his 
said Land called Little Winters, provided that he paid seven 
pounds per annum thereout for ever to the Professor aforesaid; 
and by the second of such Codicils the said Testator declared his 
Will that if he should sell the said fee-farm rent, then he be- 
queathed to the Master and Fellows of Peterhouse, to enable 
them the better to pay the said Casuistical Professor, the sum of 
four hundred and fifty pounds, but if he did not sell it, then his 



39 

Will was that they should enjoy the said fee-farm rent ; and by 
the third of such Codicils the said Testator gave to the Master 
and Fellows of Peterhouse, as Feoffees in trust for the Professor, 
all that House and Land which he lately bought of one Osborne, 
which he then let for eight pounds ten shillings a year, to be for 
ever employed for that purpose. And whereas the said John 
Enightbridge departed this life some time in the month of 
December, one thousand six hundred and seyenty-seyen, leaving 
the said Anthony Enightbridge his brother and heir at law him 
surviving, to whom letters of administration of the Estate and 
effects of the said John Enightbridge, with his said Will and 
Codicils annexed, were shortly afterwards granted by the Pre^ 
rogative Court of the Archbishop of Canterbury : And whereas 
neither the said Will nor any of the said three Codicils was 
attested by any witness, and the same were therefore ineffectual 
to pass Freehold Estate, but the said Anthony Enightbridge 
being desirous of carrying into effect the charitable intentions 
of his said brother, agreed to confirm the said several devises 
so made as aforesaid, with the exception of substituting for the 
said rent charge of seven pounds per annum certain Lands at 
Chelmsford, in the County of Essex, called Chappell Lands and 
Skiggett's Croft of equal yearly value, and of conveying as well 
such Lands, as also the other property devised by the said 
Testator to the Trustees heremafter in that behalf mentioned 
instead of to the Master and Fellows of Peterhouse: And 
whereas accordingly by Indenture of bargain and sale duly 
enrolled in the Court of Chancery, bearing date the twentieth 
day of July, one thousand six hundred and eighty, and made 
between the said Anthony Enightbridge of the one part and Sir 
Thomas Exton then Master of Trinity Hall in the University of 
Cambridge, Enight, Joseph Beaumont then Master of Peterhouse 
aforesaid, Henry James then Master of Queens* College in the 
same University, and William Atwood and Godfrey Thacker 
therein respectively described of the other part, reciting the s^d 
Will of the said John Enightbridge (therein described as an 
intended will), it was witnessed that the said Anthony Enight- 
bridge, having a desire to promote the good purposes and ends of 
the said intended will and to perfect the devise therein before 
recited, as also for the considerations therein mentioned, did 



40 

grant, bargain, sell, alien, enfeoff and confirm unto the said Sir 
Thomas Exton, Joseph Beaumont, Henry James, William Atwood 
and Godfrey Thacker their heirs and assigns the said fee-farm 
rent of twenty-six pounds sixteen shillings and three-pence issuing 
out of the aforesaid Manor of Heslington, and also the said 
Messuage in the Minories then called or known by the name or 
sign of the Ship, and in the tenure or occupation of Cooke, 
scrivener, and also the said Lands called Chappell Lands, con- 
taining by estimation ten acres, and the parcel of Land called 
Skiggett's Croft containing by estimation ten acres, and also 
a Messuage with the Grounds thereunto belonging situate in 
Writtle and Margaretting in the said County of Essex, as the 
same were in the occupation of Thomas Turner or his assigns, and 
were purchased by the said John Enightbridge of one Thomas 
Osborne (being the hereditaments mentioned in the said third 
Codicil) : To hold the same unto the said Sir Thomas Exton, 
Joseph Beaumont, Henry James, William Atwood and Godfrey 
Thacker their heirs and assigns for ever : Nevertheless in trust 
and to the uses, intents and purposes and under the limitations 
and conditions in the said intended Will expressed and declared. 
And whereas the said Trustees being unable to find a fit person 
to undertake the Professorship of Casuistry according to the 
terms of the Will of the said John Enightbridge, and it being 
considered desirable to relax and modify such terms, a suit was 
in or about the year one thousand six hundred and eighty-two 
instituted in the Court of Chancery by the then Attorney-General 
on behalf of the University of Cambridge, and by the then 
Vice-Chancellor and Kegius and Margnret Professors of Divinity 
of the same University, against the Master and Fellows of Peter- 
house aforesaid, and the said Anthony Enightbridge and the 
said five Trustees so by him nominated as aforesaid for the 
regulation of the said Professorship, and for putting the Lands of 
the Charity under the direction of the said Court, and by the 
decree made in the said suit by the then Lord Chancellor, on the 
eighteenth day of July, one thousand six hundred and eighty-two, 
it was ordered that the trust of the said Will should be performed, 
but with this exception, that the aforesaid Lands called Chappell 
Lands and Skiggett's Croft and the Estate therein should be 
settled and established with the said Defendants the Trustees, 



41 

according to the said deed of the twentieth day of July, one 
thousand six hundred and eighty, and that the rents diereof 
should be duly applied in discharge of the said trusts, and that 
the Lands called Little Vintners, lying in Chelmsford in the 
County of Essex (being the same as those hereinbefore called 
Little Winters), should be held and enjoyed by the said Anthony 
and his heirs according to the said deed, which was thereby 
decreed to be confirmed, discharged of the said seven pounds per 
annum, devised thereout towards discharge of the trusts by the 
said intended devise. And to the end that the said settlement 
might have its effect as near as might be according to the intent 
of the said Doctor's Will, which it could not well have by the 
strictness of the penning the Will, without capacitating a Lec- 
turer of fewer years and abridging the number of Lectures termly : 
His Lordship did further order and direct, by and with the con- 
sent of the said Anthony Enightbridge as heir and next of kin, 
and being the founder of the said gift having made the settlement 
as aforesaid to effect the same: That the Professor to be chosen 
by the Electors should be Doctor or at least Bachelor of 
Divinity and capable, if he should be of the age of forty years 
or upwards, and that the ^ aid Lectures should be reduced to four 
in each term instead of five, and that such Lectures should be 
delivered in. writing to the Vice- Chancellor for the time being 
once only in every year (that is to say) on the twentieth day of 
July, and if the said Lectures were neglected to be read and 
exhibited according to the decree now in recital, without reason- 
able cause in writing under the hands of the major part of the 
Electors, that then the Master and Fellows of the said College, 
to whom the rents of the premises were to be paid to maintain 
the said Lectures, were to withdraw the said maintenance to their 
own use, according to the directions of the Testator by the said 
intended Will, and what the said Defendants, the Master and 
Fellows of the said College, should act or do in pursuance of the 
decree now in recital was to be without prejudice to their right 
by the said Will otherwise than as to the age of the Lecturer, 
number of the Lectures and delivery as aforesaid entirely and to 
be. thereby saved harmless and indemnified, and that the costs 
and charges both of the settlement and of the suit should be 
deducted out of the rents and arrears of the aforesaid lands 




42 

since the said settlement, and also all costs charges and taxes 
and abatements of rent thereafter happening and repairs were to 
be deducted out of the said Lands and rents, or out of the 
stipend and allowance of the said Lecturer, and the Master and 
Fellows of Peterhouse aforesaid were to receive the said rents 
issues and profits and their estate in the premises according to 
the deed of settlement confirmed, and that the said Anthony 
Enightbridge, and other the parties to the said deed, should make 
and execute such further assurance of the said Lands and rents 
as Sir Edward Lowe, Knight, should direct, in case the parties 
should differ, with corenants asainst themselves only and their 
only and respective acts and defds : And whereas sLrtly after 
the making of the said decree the Beverend Thomas Smoult, 
Doctor in Divinity, was duly elected Professor of Casuistry in 
the said University of Cambridge and retained such office until 
his death in the year one thousand seven hundred and soTen, 
since which time divers persons have been from time to time 
appointed to the said Professorship, the last of whom (with the 
exception of the present Professor) was the Reverend Francis 
Barnes, Doctor in Divinity and Master of Peterhouse, who was 
appointed to that office in the year one thousand eight hundred 
and thirteen, and retained the same until his death hereinafter 
mentioned : And whereas the said Sir Thomas Exton, Joseph 
Beaumont, Henry James, William Atwood, and Godfrey Thacker 
have all long since died, and the said Henry James was the last 
survivor of them, and he in the year one thousand seven hundred 
and thirteen, as such survivor as aforesaid, conveyed the said trust 
premises to eight new Trustees, of whom Richard Bently and 
Charles Ashton, both Doctors in Divinity, were in the year one 
thousand seven hundred and forty-one the sole survivors : And 
whereas by Indentures of Lease and Re-lease bearing date 
respectively the third and fourth days of June, one thousand 
seven hundred and forty-one, the Re-lease being made between the 
said Richard Bently and Charles Ashton of the first part, the Master 
and Fellows of Peterhouse of the second part, and Thomas 
Burrowes, Esquire, of the third part, and by other Indentures of 
Lease and Re-lease bearing date respectively the fifth and mxth 
days of June, one thousand seven hundred and forty-one, the 
Re-lease being made between the said Thomas Burrowes of the 



43 

first part, the Master and Fellows of Peterhouse of the second 
part, and the said Richard Bently and Charles Ashton, Matthias 
Mawson, then Bishop of Chichester, and six other persons of the 
third part, the said trust premises were conyeyed to the said 
seyeral persons parties of the third part to the said last mentioned 
Indenture of Re-lease and their heirs upon the trusts of the said 
intended Will, the said Indenture of bargain and sale and the 
said decree : And whereas the said Matthias Mawson survived 
all his said co-Trustees, and died in the year one thousand seven 
hundred and seventy intestate, and it is not known who is his 
heir : And whereas in the year one thousand eight hundred and 
thirty-seven the said House in the Minories was purchased by the 
London and BlackwaU Railway Company (then the Commercial 
Railway Company) for a sum of six hundred pounds, which, by 
successive orders of the Court of Exchequer, and by virtue of an 
Act passed for abolishing the equitable jurisdiction of that Court, 
waB invested in a sum of six hundred and sixty-five pounds 
fourteen shillings and ten-pence reduced three per cent, annuities, 
lately standing in the name of the Accountant-general of the 
Court of Chancery to the account of the Professor of Casuistry 
in the University of Cambridge : And whereas in the month of 
April, one thousand eight hundred and thirty-eight, and while 
the said Francis Barnes was Master of Peterhouse and Professor 
of Casuistry, the Master and Fellows of Peterhouse instituted 
a suit in Chancery against the then Attorney-general for the 
purpose of having it declared that the Professor of Casuistry for 
the time being was entitled only to the annual sum of fifty 
pounds, and that all the income arising from the said charitable 
donations beyond that sum belonged absolutely to the Master 
and Fellows of Peterhouse: And whereas the said Francis 
Barnes died on the second day of May, one thousand eight 
hundred and thirty-eight, and on the twenty-seventh day ot 
June following the said William Whewell was appointed Professor 
of Casuistry in his place, and thereupon a supplemental bill wad 
filed against him by the Master and Fellows of Peterhouse, and 
the said original and supplemental suits coming on to be heard 
before the Vice-Chancellor of England on the sixteenth day of 
July, one thousand eight hundred and thirty-nine, his Honour 
declared that according to the true construction of Uie said WiU 



44 

tod Codicik, and of the said bargain and sale, and of the said 
decree of the eighteenth day of July, one thousand six hundred 
and eighty-two, the Casuistical Professor in the University of 
Cambridge performing the duties theri**"* '^'^^f^ on him was 
entitled to the whole rents and profits of the said trust premises, 
and the plaintiffs^ said bills were dismissed : And whereas in the 
year one thousand eight hundred and forty-three, the said 
William Whewell entered into an agreement with John Attwood 
of Hylands, in the County of Essex, Esquire (subject to the 
approbation of the Court of Chancery) for the sale to him of 
the said hereditaments at Chelmsford, Writtle and Margaretting 
for such a sum of money as at the time of the completion of the 
purchase would be equivalent to one thousand six hundred and 
sixty-six pounds thirteen shillings and four-pence consolidated 
three per cent, annuities, exclusive of the timber, pollards, spires 
and underwood thereon, which were to be taken separately by 
the said John Attwood at a valuation, and upon the terms that 
the said John Attwood should pay all costs, charges and expences 
of and incidental to the making of the said agreement and carry- 
ing the same into complete execution : And whereas the said 
timber, pollards, spires and underwood were valued by a person 
appointed by the said John Attwood and William Whewell 
jointly at the sum of one hundred and fifteen pounds seventeen 
shillings and sixpence : And whereas, for the purpose of having 
the said agreement confirmed by the Court of Chancery, and of 
having new Trustees of the said freehold hereditaments appointed 
by the said Court, the said William Whewell and the Reverend 
William Hodgson Master of Peterhouse aforesaid did in the 
month of March one thousand eight hundred and forty-six, with 
the sanction of her Majesty's Attorney-general, present their 
petition to the Lord High- Chancellor of Great Britain intituled 
as well in the said suit of " The Attorney-general against Peter- 
house," as also in the matter of the Act of Parliament passed in 
the fifty-second year of the reign of King George the Third, 
intituled " An Act to provide a summary remedy in cases of 
abuses of trust created fc^ charitable purposes," and in the 
matter of the Act passed in the first year of the reign of King 
William the Fourth, intituled " An Act for amending the laws 
respecting conveyances and transfers of estates vested in Trustees 



45 

and Mortgagees^ and for enabling Courts of Equity to give 
effect to their decrees and orders in certain cases," and such 
petition haying been heard before the yice-Cbancellor of England, 
his honour did, on the sixteenth day of March, one thousand eight 
hundred and forty-six, order that it should be referred to the 
Master of the said Court in rotation to inquire and state to the 
Court whether it would be fit and proper, and for the benefit of 
the said Charity, that the lands and hereditaments which were 
the subject of the said conditional agreement entered into 
between the said John Attwood and William Whewell should be 
sold to the said John Attwood at the price and on the terms 
hereinbefore mentioned : And it was referred to the said Master 
to approve of proper persons to be Trustees of the said Charity 
in the place of the last appointed Trustees, who were all dead, 
and to settle a scheme for the renewal of Trustees from time 
to time: And it was referred to the said Master to inquire 
and state to the Court whether Matthias Mawson, Bishop of 
Chichester, was a Trustee of the Estate comprised in the said 
Indentures of Lease and Re-lease, dated respectively the fifth and 
sixth days of June, One thousand seven hundred and forty-one, 
under the Will of the said John Enightbridge, and whether he 
died intestate as to the said Trust Estate, and if so, who was his 
heir at law : And if the said Master should find that the said 
Matthias Mawson died intestate as to the said Trust Estate, and 
that it was not known who was his heir, then it was ordered 
that the said Master should approve of a proper person to con- 
vey the Trust Estate in the place of the said Matthias Mawson : 
And whereas the Master to whom the said matter was referred 
made his report thereon, dated the second day of February, one 
thousand eight hundred and forty-seven, and thereby, after 
finding to the effect hereinbefore recited, and finding that the 
said Thomas Smoult, the first Professor of Casuistry, by his last 
Will, dated the twenty-ninth day of September, one thousand 
seven hundred and three, bequeathed a sum of three hundred 
pounds, to purchase land or any rents of that value, to be 
annexed to the settlement so made by the said Anthony Enight- 
bridge as aforesaid, for the use or maintenance of a Casuist 
Reader, or Professor in Practical Theology, the land or purchase 
to be settled upon the same or other trusts, at the discretion of 






> 



46 

bis, the said Testator's Executors, and after finding that on the 
sixteenth day of October, one thousand seven hundred and seven, 
such Will with a codicil thereto was duly proved in the Pre- 
rogative CJourt of the Archbishop of Canterbury, by Edward 
Chester therein named, who shortly afterwards laid out the 
said legacy of three hundred pounds in the purchase of several 
pieces of land of copyhold tenure, some of which were situate in 
the parish of Ashwell in the county of Hertford, and were held 
of the Manor of Ashwell, and contained twelve acres, three roods 
and thirty-three perches, or thereabouts, and the rest of which 
were situate in the parish of Therfield in the same County, and 
were to the extent of twelve acres and one perch or thereabouts, 
held of the Manor of Therfield, and two acres or thereabouts 
held of the Rectory Manor of Therfield, and after finding that 
the said several copyhold hereditaments were never surrendered 
to the use of the Trustees acting under the said Will of the said 
John Enightbridge, but the Professor of Casuistry for the time 
being had either been admitted to the same, or had received the 
rents and profits thereof, the said Master found that the property 
of the said Professorship consisted (besides the said six hundred 
and sixty-five pounds, fourteen shillings and ten pence, reduced 
three per cent, annuities, so standing in the Accountant-general's 
name as aforesaid) of the said rent of twenty-six pounds, sixteen 
shillings and three-pence per annum, issuing out of the said 
Manor of Heslington, the said copyhold premises at Ashwell and 
Therfield, two fields at Chelmsford, one called Saw-wood field, 
containing thirteen acres or thereabouts, and the other called the 
Ten-acre field, and containing eleven acres or thereabouts (being 
the lands hereinbefore called respectively Cbappell Lands and 
Skiggett's Croft), two fields at Writtle aforesaid, one called the 
Cottage-field, and containing two acres or thereabouts, and having 
a cottage and barn thereon, and the other called the Four-acre- 
field, conttuning four acres or thereabouts, and one close of 
woodland or coppice at Margaretting, called the Vine-yard, con<^ 
taining five acres or thereabouts : And after finding that there 
was not, and had not for some time past been any known Trustee 
of such property, but that the ssud William Wbewell had been 
admitted tenant of the siud copyhold premises at Therfield, the 
said Master found that the hereditaments so conditionally agreed 



47 

to be sold to the said John Attwood as aforesaid, produced at 
the time of such agreement twentj-four pounds per annum, and 
no more, and were worth to purchase eight hundred and fifty 
pounds only, and that it would be fit and proper, and for the 
benefit of the said Charity, that the said hereditaments should 
be sold to the said John Attwood at the price, and on the terms 
aforesaid : And the said Master approved of the then and now 
Master of St. John's College, Regius Professor of Divinity, 
Lady Margaret's Professor of Divinity, and Regius Professor of 
Civil Law, and the then and now Master of Trinity College, 
when not filling the office of Professor of Casuistry, all being of 
the said University of Cambridge, as proper persons to be 
Trustees of the Charity in the place of the last appointed Trus- 
tees, who were all dead : And he certified that he had settled 
the following scheme for the renewal of Trustees from time to 
time (that is to say) that when any or either of such Trustees 
BO approved of by him as aforesaid, or of any future Trustees 
for the time being should die, or resign, or cease to hold his 
official situation thereinbefore respectively mentioned, the person 
succeeding to such official situation, and not filling the office of 
Professor of Casuistry, should be appointed in his place, in case 
he should be willing, to accept the trust, and if not, then that it 
should be lawful for the surviving or other Trustees or Trustee 
to appoint a proper person or persons to fill up such vacancy or 
vacancies so occasioned, and to convey the Trust Premises vested 
in the person or persons making such appointment, in such man. 
ner, that the same might be vested in such new Trustee or 
Trustees jointly with the surviving or other Trustees or Trustee 
if any, and if there should be none, then in such new Trustees 
alone : And he found that the said MatthiaiS Mawson, Bishop of 
Chichester, was a Trustee of the Estate comprised in the said 
Indentures of Lease and Release, dated respectively the fifth and 
sixth days of June, one thousand seven hundred and forty-one, 
under the said Will of the said John Enightbridge, and that he 
died intestate as to the said Trust Estate, and that it was not 
known who was his heir^t-law, and he approved of the said 
Frederick James Fuller as a proper person to convey the said 
Trust Estate in the place of the said Matthias Mawson : And 
^whereas by an order made by His Honour the Vice-Chancellor 



48 

of EDgland, on the nineteenth day of February, one thousand 
eight hundred and forty-seven, on the petition of the said 
William Whewell and William Hodgson, the said report was 
confirmed, and it was ordered that the then and now Master of 
St. John's College, Begins Professor of Divinity, Lady Mar- 
garet's Professor of Divinity, and Regius Professor of Civil 
Law, and the then and now Master of Trinity College, when not 
filling the office of Professor of Casuistry, all being of the said 
University of Cambridge, should be appointed Trustees of the 
said Charity, in the place and stead of the last appointed Trus- 
tees, and they were to declare the trust thereof accordingly : And 
it was ordered that the said Frederick James Fuller should in 
the place and stead of the heir of the said Matthias Mawson, 
Bishop of Chichester, convey the said fee-farm rent of twenty- 
six pounds sixteen shillings and three-pence, and the freehold 
lands belonging to the said Charity to such new Trustees so 
appointed as aforesaid: And it was ordered that when any or 
either of such Trustees so appointed as aforesaid, or any future 
Trustee or Trustees for the time being should die or resign, or 
cease to hold his official situation hereinbefore respectively 
mentioned, the person succeeding to such official situation, and 
not filling the office of Professor of Casuistry, should be appointed 
in his place, in case he should be willing to accept the trust, and 
if not, then it was declared that it should be lawful for the sur- 
viving or other Trustees or Trustee to appoint a proper person 
or persons to fill up such vacancy or vacancies so occasioned, 
and to convey the Trust Premises vested in the person or persons 
making such appointment in such manner that the same might 
be vested in' such new Trustee or Trustees jointly with the sur- 
viving or other Trustees or Trustee, if any, and if there should 
be none, then in such new Trustees alone : And it was ordered 
that the said agreement between the said William Whewell and 
John Attwood should be performed and carried into execution by 
and under the authority of the said Court, and that the said new 
Trustees should convey the hereditaments comprised in such 
agreement to the sud John Attwood, or as he should direct : 
And it was ordered that the said John Attwood should on or 
before the twentieth day of April then next transfer the sum of 
one thousand six hundred and sixty-six pounds thirteen shillings 



49 

and four-pence Bank three per cent, annuities into the name, 
and with the privity of the Accountant-general of the said Court, 
in trust in the said cause, the Attorney-General v, the Master 
and Fellows of Feterhouse, and the said Accountant-general was 
to declare the trust thereof accordingly, subject to the further 
order of the said Court : And it was ordered that the said John 
Attwood should on or before the said twentieth day of April 
then next pay into the Bank with the privity of the said 
Accountant-general to the credit of the same cause the sum of 
one hundred and fifteen pounds seventeen shillings and six-pence, 
being the amount of the valuation of the timber, pollards, spires 
and underwood in the said agreement mentioned : And it was 
ordered that such sum, when so paid in, should be laid out in the 
purchase of Bank three per cent, annuities in the name and 
with the privity of the said Accountant-general in trust in the 
said cause: And the said Accountant-general was to declare 
the trust thereof accordingly, subject to the further order of the 
said Court : And it was ordered that the six hundred and sixty- 
five pounds fourteen shillings and ten-pence reduced annuities, 
standing in the name of the said Accountant-general, in trust, 
in the matter intituled ''The account of the Professor of Casuistry 
in the University of Cambridge,'^ and any interest that might 
accrue on the said reduced annuities previous to the carrying 
over thereby directed, should be carried over in the name, and 
with the privity of the said Accountant-general, in trust in and 
to the credit of the said cause : And the said Accountant-general 
was to declare the trust of the said reduced annuities accordingly, 
subject to the further order of the said Court: And it was 
ordered that the interest to accrue due on the said one thousand 
six hundred and sixty-six pounds thirteen shillings and four-pence 
Bank three pounds per cent, annuities when so transferred, 
and on the Bank three pounds per cent, annuities when so 
purchased as aforesaid, and on the said six hundred and sixty- 
five pounds fourteen shillings and ten-pence Bank reduced 
annuities, when so carried over as aforesaid, should be from time 
to time, as the same should become due, paid to the said William 
Whewell, or unto the Professor of Casuistry for the time being, 
until the further order of the said Court, the appointment of 
every such successor to be verified by affidavit, and the usual 

4 



50 

powers were given to the said Accountant-general, and direo- 
tions were given for the payment of the costs of the Attorney- 
general : And whereas, in obedience to the said order, the said 
cdx hundred and sixty-five pounds fourteen shillings and ten- 
pence reduced three per cent, annuities have been carried over 
to the credit of the said cause of the Attorney-general against 
the Master and Fellows of Peterhouse, and the sum of one 
thousand six hundred and sixty -six pounds thirteen shillings and 
four-pence consolidated three per cent, annuities has been trans- 
ferred into the name of the said Accountant-general in trust in 
the said cause by the said John Attwood, who has also paid into 
the Bank to the credit of the said cause the sum of one hundred 
and fifteen pounds seventeen shillings and six.pence sterling, 
which has been laid out in the purchase of one hundred and 
thirty-three pounds three shillings and nine-pence consolidated 
three per cent annuities, in the name of the said Accountant- 
general in trust in the said cause, making with the said one 
thousand six hundred and sixty-six pounds thirteen shillings and 
four-pence like annuities the total sum of one thousand seven 
hundred and ninety-nine pounds seventeen shillings and one 
penny like annuities : And whereas the said Wilham Whewell is 
still Professor of Casuistry and Master of Trinity College afore- 
said : Now this Indenture witnesseth, that in pursuance of and 
in obedience to the said recited order of the nineteenth day of 
February, one thousand eight hundred and forty-seven, and in 
consideration of all and singular the premises, he the said 
Frederick James Fuller, acting in the place of the heir of the 
said Matthias Mawson deceased and by virtue of the power to 
him the said Frederick James Fuller given by the said last-men- 
tioned order, and so far only as he lawfully can or may, doth (with 
the approbation of the said William Whewell, testified by hia 
executing these presents) hereby grant and release unto the 
said Balph Tatham, Alfred OUivant, John James Blunt and 
Henry James Sumner Maine, and their heirs : All that fee-farm 
rent of twenty-six pounds sixteen shillings and three-pence per 
annum so issuing out of the said Manor of Heslington as afore- 
said ; And also all those two fields situate at Chelmsford, in the 
County of Essex, whereof one is called Saw-wood field, and con- 
tains thirteen acres or thereabouts, and the other is called the 



51 

Ten-acre-field, and contains eleven acres or thereabouts, which 
two fields were formerly called, or occupy the site of lands 
formerly called, respectively, Chappell Lands and Skiggett's Croft; 
And also all those two fields situate at Writtle, in the same County 
of Essex, one whereof is called the Cottage- field, and contains 
two acres or thereabouts, and the other is called the Four-acre- 
field, and contains four acres or thereabouts ; and also the cottage 
and barn standing on part of the said field called the Cottage- 
field ; and also all that close of woodland or coppice situate at 
Margaretting in the same County, called the Vine-yard, contain- 
ing five acres or thereabouts, all which said fields and heredita- 
ments at Chelmsford, Writtle and Margaretting, are now in the 
occupation of the said John Attwood, his under tenants or 
assigns ; and all rights, members, and appurtenances to the said 
rent-charge, fields, lands and hereditaments respectively belong- 
ing, and the reversions, remainders, rents, issues, and profits 
thereof; to have and to hold the said rent-charge, fields, heredi- 
taments, and all other the premises hereinbefore granted, or 
intended so to be, unto the said Balph Tatham, Alfred OUivant, 
John James Blunt and Henry James Sumner Maine, and their 
heirs for ever, nevertheless to the uses following (that is to say) 
to the use of the said Balph Tatham, Alfred OUivant, John 
James Blunt and Henry James Sumner Maine, their heirs and 
assigns, until the said William Whewell shall resign or vacate 
the office of Professor of Casuistry in the University of Cam- 
bridge, while continuing Master of Trinity College in that 
University, and from and after the resignation or vacating by 
the said William Whewell of the said Professorship, while con- 
tinuing Master of Trinity College aforesaid (in case such event 
shall happen) to the use of the said Balph Tatham, Alfred 
OUivant, John James Blunt, Henry James Sumner Maine and 
WiUiam WheweU, their heirs and assigns for ever: And it is 
hereby agreed and declared that the said Balph Tatham, Alfred 
OUivant, John James Blunt and Henry James Sumner Maine, 
their heirs and assigns, until such resignation or vacating of office 
by the said William Whewell as aforesaid, and after that event 
(in case it should happen) the said Balph Tatham, Alfred OUivant, 
John James Blunt, Henry James Sumner Maine and William 
Whewell, their heirs and assigns, shall and wiU stand seized of 

4 — 2 



52 

the hereditaments hereinbefore granted, or intended so to be, 
upon the trusts to which under the circumstances hereinbefore 
recited the said hereditaments are respectively subject; In 
witness whereof the said parties to these presents have hereunto 
set their hands and seals the day and year first above written. 

(Signed) Frbdbrick Jambs Fulleb. 

William Whewell. 
Balph Tatham. 
Alfred Ollivant, 
John James Blunt. 
Henry Jambs Sumner Maine. 



63 



yi. Flumian Professorship. 

1. Statement concerning Dr. Plume*8 Will and the Orders of 

the Court of Chancery thereon. 

Thomas Plume, D.D; and Archdeacon of Rochester, by his 
Will, bearing date the second day of September 1704, orders 
his Executor James Plume, among a variety of bequests, to pay 
to Dr. Covell, Master of Christ's College ; Dr. Bentley, Master 
of Trinity College ; Dr. Francis Thompson, Master of Caius Col- 
lege ; and William Whiston, the Lucasian Professor, the sum of 
one thousand pounds he had in the Bank, and seven hundred 
pounds, and £202. 12«. 2d, Orphans^ Stock in the Chamber of 
London, to erect an Observatory, and to maintain a Professor of 
Astronomy and Experimental Philosophy, and to buy or build a 
House with or near the same; and willed that the principal 
money should not be removed from the Bank till a good pur- 
chase had been made with it. In consequence of an application 
to the Court of Chancery to compel the Executor to carry into 
effect the intention of the Testator: it was decreed, that the 
£1000. the £700. and the £202. 12«. 2d. directed to be laid 
out in a purchase, (it being now alleged that a convenient and 
proper estate hath been found, and some proceedings made in 
order to a purchase thereof,) that the said Master do look into 
the Purchase, and see that a Settlement thereof be made to 
Trustees to be approved by him ; and that such deed of Settle- 
ment do contain proper Clauses declaring it to be a Trust ; and 
what the particular trusts are according to the Testator's Will : 
and that in the same Deed notice be taken that the College duly 
admit their building to be purchased as an Observatory. But if 
the said College shall hereafter refuse to permit the said Build- 
ing to be used as such, then what of the said Money shall be 
laid out in an Observatory, is reserved for the consideration of 
this Court, and the same Master is to see what of the said Money 
will be remaining after the said purchase paid^ and what shall be 
so remaining is to be laid out in making the said Building fit for 
an Observatory : and also in an house directed by the said WiU 



54 

for the Astronomical Professor. And if such remaipder fall short 
of furnishing the said Observatory and House, then such defi- 
ciency is to be made good out of the Bents and Profits of the 
intended purchased Estate when such purchase shall be made: 
And whereas Statutes and Ordinances have been proposed for 
the better managing the said Charity, it is ordered, that the said 
Master do look into the same; and when he shall have approved 
thereof, then such Statutes and Ordinances so approved are to 
be annexed by way of Schedule to the said Deed declaring the 
said Trusts. 

2. Covenant of the Master and Seniors of Trinity College. 

Web the Master and Seniors of Trinity College in Cambridge 
doe covenant and agree with the Trustees or Electors for the 
Professorship of Astronomy and Experimental Philosophy lately 
founded by Dr. Plume; that Roger Cotes, fellow of this College, 
now nominated to the said Professorship, and all his successors 
after him, of what College or place soever they shall be, shall 
have the roomes and leads of the Eing^s Gate of this College, for 
a Dwelling and Observatory soe long as the Trustees and Electors 
of the said Professorship shall think fit ; the Possessor, paying 
from time to time ten poundes per annum to the Fellow, whose 
chamber it shall be in the College course. Provided always, 
while they shall use the Ring's Gate for the Observatory, that 
the Scholar appointed to be the Professor's Assistant and to lodg 
in the same dwelling with him, be one of this College, to be chosen 
by the Professor with the consent of the Master. In testimony 
whereof wee have affixed hereunto the College Scale the nynth 
day of February, anno Domini 1705. 

3. Letters Patent of Queen Anne. 

Anna Dei Gratia Magnae Britanniae, Franciae, et Hiberniae 
Begina Fidei Defensor, &c. Omnibus ad quos praesentes Literae 
nostrae pervenerint Salutem, cum fideles et dilecti nobis Johannes 
Covel Sacrae Theologiae Doctor et Magister Collegii Christi in 
XJniversitate nostrai Cantabrigiae, Bicardus Bentley Sacrae Theo- 
logiae Doctor et Magister Collegii Sanctae Trinitatis ibidem, 
Gulielmus Whiston Artium Magister et Matheseos Professor Luca- 
sianus ibidem, per Petitionem suam nobis humillime representa- 



55 

yerint. Quod Thomas Plume Sacrae Theologiae Doctor et 
Archidiaconus Roffensis nuper defunctus per Testamentum et 
ultimam yoluntatem suam legaverit circiter miUe et quingentas 
Libras expendendas, pro emptione terrarum in perpetuam mana- 
tentionem Professoris Astronomiae et Philosophiae Experimentalis 
in XJniversitate nostrsi praedict£i, ac praefatum Johannem Goveli 
Ricardum Bentlej, et Gulielmum Whiston, et quondam FranciEh 
cum Thompson Sacrae Theologiae Doctorem Fiduciaries sues 
pro emptione et dispositione talium terrarum ac ad componendam 
quandam formam Statutorum proElectione Qualificatione et Officio 
talis Professoris imperpetuum fore constituit; Quodque ipsi se- 
cundum tenorem et formam ultimae yoluntatis praedictae quasdam 
terras apud Balsham in comitatu nostro Cantabrigiae emissent ; 
ac easdem officio Professoris praedicti annexissent, ac etiam quan- 
dam formam Statutorum, ut praefertur, composuissent. Quae 
quidem Statuta sequuntur in haec yerba, yiz. Omnibus Christi 
Fidelibus ad quos hoc praesens scripium f^ryenerit, Johannes 
Coyel Sacrae Theologiae Doctor et Magister GoUegii Christi 
Cantabrigiae, Franciscus Thompson Sacrae Theologiae Doctor, 
Ricardus Bentley Sacrae Theologiae Doctor et Magister Collegii 
Sanctae Trinitatis, et Gulielmus Whiston Artium Magister et 
Matheseos^ Professor Lucasianus fidei commissarii pro parte ultimi 
Testamenti Reyerendi yiri Tho. Plume Sacrae Theologiae Doctoris 
et Archidiaconi Roffensis nuper defuncti, salutem in Domino 
sempitemam. Noyeritis quod cum dictus Reyerendus yir Thomas 
Flume ex prepense sue in Academiam Cantabrigiensem, et rem 
literariam affectu, pecuniam ad Libras circiter miUe et octingentas 
supremo sue Testamento legayerit, undo tantum terrae siye fundi 
emeretur quantum, per annuos reditus ad perpetuum Stipendium 
Professoris Astronomiae et Philosophiae Experimentalis sufficeret, 
et praeterea undo Obseryatorium, Domus et Instrumenta, ad 
munus illud exequendum necessaria comparari possint: atque 
insuper eodem Testamento mandayerit, ut nos dicti Fidei com- 
missarii adhibito celeberrimorum yirorum Johannis Ellis Equitis, 
Isaaci Newton Equitis, Johannis Flamstead Astronomi Regii 
consilio ordinationes et Statuta faceremus, quibus dictus Professor 
perpetuis futuris temporibus eligi, et electus obstringi et obtem- 
perare debeat Nos igitur dicti Fidei commissarii, adhibito prius 
dictorum yirorum consilio, ordinationes infra scriptas approbamus. 



56 

omniaque per dicti Thomae Plame Testamentam nobis concessa 
authoritate rata esse yolumus et declaramas. 

Statuimus imprimis et ordinamus, ut quicquid annui Reditus, 
ex terns sive fundis apad Balsbam ia Agro Cantabrigiensi ad 
usum praedictum emptis et acquisitis quacunque justa ratione 
accreverit illud integrum cedat in Emolumentum et Praemium 
Frofessoris Astronomiae et Pbilosophiae £xperimentalis, sub con- 
ditionibus mox exprimendis electi et constituti, exceptis duntaxat 
iis pecuniis, quas ad sustentandum Scholarem, ad Instrumenta 
comparanda, et ad Domum, Obseryatoriumque, erogari yolamus, 
nempe ad alendum unum Scholarem Astronomiae peritum qui 
per dictum Professorem eligatur ut in Obseryationibus Experi* 
mentisque faciendis opituletur ei et subyeniat, e&que causS in 
Frofessoris Dome cubiculum gratis habeat quinque Libras quot- 
annis a dicto Professore solyendas esse decernimus, et quinque 
pariter Libras singulis annis in Instrumenta ab eo impendi, 
Obseryatorium yer* et domum conduci, et quotiescunque opus 
fuerit reparari yolumus sumptibus Frofessoris, arbitrioque Elec- 
torum qui tunc fnerint. Forro omnia Instrumenta, quae ad usus 
praedictos yel empta yel donata fuerint, in indiculo siye inyentorio 
describi et recenseri cujus unum Exemplar penes Frocancellarium 
erit: Et si quae eorum negligentia Frofessoris yel amitti yel 
corrumpi contigerit, ea singula ejus sumptibus yel comparari 
denuo yel resarciri et refici yolumus. Quod ad officium et munus 
dicti Frofessoris attinet, declaramus et Statuimus, ut singulis annis 
binas praelectiones yel orationes de Astronomic yel Fhilosophia 
experimentali Latino faabeat in scholis publicis, loco et tempore 
per Frocancellarium praescribendo, diem autem et horam per 
Bedellos singulis GoUegus subinde significari Frocancellarius pro 
sua authoritate curabit. Statuimus insuper ut dictus Professor 
praeter alia ipsius arbitrio judieioque permittenda, iis potissimum 
obseryationibus diligenter incumbat, quae ad Astronomiam pro- 
moyendam perficiendamque, pro yariis hujus Scientiae Incrementis, 
et Saeculorum progressu desiderari yidebuntur, qualia hodie 
habentur haec sequentia, ut cometae omnes, quotiescunque in his 
oris conspicui fuerint accurate obseryentur, eorum longitudines et 
latitudines computentur, orbesque ex ealculo determinentur, noyae 
etiam Stellae, si quae forte apparuerint sedulo notentur, Mercurii 
item et Veneris transitus supra Solem, Solis^ Lunae, Joyisque, et 



67 

6jus Satellitum, Eclipses Lonae, loca apparentia et Diametri io 
ejus Quadratoris et nonnunquam in oetantibus et oppositionibus, 
Saturni, Jovis, Martisque loca ia eorum oppositionibus et nonnun- 
quam in Quadraturis, Veneris et Mercurii maxime a Sole elonga- 
tiones, Jovis et Saturni conjunctiones, Soils et Stellae alicujus 
fij^ae rectarum Ascensionum differentia, cum Sol in suo Apogeo yel 
Perigeo vel mediis distantiis fuerit, Veneris etiam et Solis rectarum 
Ascensionum differentia, cum Venus in suo Perigeo vel prope id 
fuerit. Inque hisce Observationibus faciendis res ipsa postulare 
videtur, ut Professor Sextantem quadrupedalis saltern Radii, et 
Telescopium duodecim minimum pedum vel quatuordecim cum 
Micrometre adhibeat, atque alia porro Instrumenta quae usus 
rerum Magister, et astronomorum Solertia posthac invenerit. 
Quin et Horologium suum castiget et constituat, ad transitus Stel- 
larum fixarum supra aperturam fixi Perspicilli, atque inde Obser- 
vationum suarum verum tempus computet et definiat. Volumus 
praeterea ut singulorum annorum Observationes, ut et binas illas 
Praelectiones sive Orationes Uteris mandet atque intra annum 
proximum earum exemplar nitide descriptum Procancellario exhi- 
beat) in Academiae Archivis servandum, et cum electoribus visum 
fuerit, Tjpis et Prelo committendum. Quod si in hac re negligens 
fuerit, neque a Procancellario monitus huic Ordination! paruerit 
Professoris Munere et Beneficio, per majorem partem Electorum 
omnino privetur: In caeteris si parum honeste et diligenter se 
gesserity aut si diutius, quam par est, ex Academiil abfuerit, 
Electorum arbitrio, vel pecunid mulctetur vel munere privetur, 
Porro ut Studentium in Academia commodis et Scientiarum In- 
cremento magis indies magisque consulatur; volumus et decern!* 
mus, ut per singulos annos, quoties pro numero Studiosorum 
commode fieri poterit, varies cursus sive collegia Domi suae vel 
in publico habeat, in Astronomicis, Opticis, Trigonometricis, Me- 
cbanicis, Staticis, Hydrostaticis, Magneticis, Pneumaticis, atque 
aliis id genus, quae ad Philosophiam Experimentalem illustrandam 
et tradendam pertinent; Atque ut singuli, qui cursum aliquem 
ingressuros se profitentur, tantum pecuniae dicto Professor! solvant, 
ad experimentorum impensas et laboris praemium quantum Pro- 
cancellario commodum esse videbitur. Optandum autem fuerit, 
si (quod Deus faxit) preclara haec Studia progressus in Academia 
debitos fecerint, ut Professor Mathematicae Lucasianus, una cum 



58 

Professore nostro junctis operibus Collegia haec habeant, et 
Impensas simul, mercedesqae laborum communium aequis partibus 
inter se dividant. Caeterum Professoris eligendi potestas hfic 
primS yice esto penes nos Fidei commissarios, postea vero quotiea- 
cunque hoc Munus vacayerit, penes Procancellarium Magistros 
Collegiorum Sanctae Trinitatis, Christie Caii, et Professorem 
Lucasianum, Quod si aliquis ex Magistris horum Collegiorum 
Procancellarius tunc fuerit, in Electorum numerum e^ vice assu- 
matur Magister CoUegii Sancti Johannis. Munere vero Professoris 
quacunque de causa yacante, Procancellarii eiit, quam primum 
fieri poterit, Schedula scholarum Publicarum Ostio affixS, tarn de 
yacatione ips&, quam de futurae Electionis die certiores omnes 
facere. Tempus autem £lectionis neque ante tricesimum post 
Schedulam affixam diem incipi, neque ultra Sexagesimum protrahi 
yolumus. Electores autem in Scholam Publicam conyenientes» 
Jurejurando se obstringant se neminem gratifi, ambitione, yel 
praemio inductos, sed eum solum, quern, consdentid teste huic 
muneri maxime idoneum censuerint, electuros. Petitionem yero 
omnibus liberam esse yolumus, seu Coelebes sint, seu Mariti, seu 
JSTostrates, siye Exteri et Peregrini, mode sint et doctrind idonei, 
et yitae morumque integri. Licebit etiam cuilibet Electorum 
quemlibet ex Petitoribus, yel per se yel per alios examinare, quo 
certius aequiusque in eligendo suffragium ferre possit. Is porro 
electus habeatur in quem tria minimum si^ragia conspiraverint. 
Quod si tres ex Electoribus, ne die quidem Sexagesimo de uno 
eligendo consenserint, is demum pro electo habeatur, quem Can- 
cellarius Academiae cum duobus quibusyis Electorum Suffragiis 
suis dignati fuerint. Electus autem statim a Procancellario 
admittatur, Jurejurando prius date, se munus Professoris Astro- 
nomiae et Philosophiae Experimentalise a Reyerendo yiro Tho. 
Plume in h&c Academic institutum, secundum Ordinationes de eo 
conditas fideliter et pro yirili exequuturum. In cujus rei Testi- 
monium, nos dicti Fidei commissarii, sigilla nostra praesenti Scripto 
apposuimus, die decimo quarto Januarii, Anno Regni serenissimae 
Reginae Annae quinto, Annoque Domini Millesimo Septingente* 
simo sexto. Johannes Coyell, Richardus Bentley, Gulielmus 
Whiston. Cumque praefatus Johannes Coyel, Richardus Bentlej, 
et Gulielmus Whiston per Petitionem suam praedictam nobis sup- 
plicayerint per Literas nostras Patentes Statuta praedicta ratificare 



59 

et confirmare ac potestatem dare Frocancellario Uniyersitatis 
nostrae praedictae tarn electoribus Professoris quam Professori 
electoSacramentum administrare. Quodque praedictuB Professor^ 
si Bociufl faerit alicujus Collegii tempore electionis ejus, officiam 
Socii una cam officio Professoris habeat, et retmeat dam coeleba 
maneat: et si non fuerit Socias alicajus Collegii et coelebs sit, 
Socias alicujos Collegii earn eligere yolentis eligator et admittatar. 
Sciatis modo quod noa ex cert& scientia et mere mota nostris 
ratificavimas, approbavimas et confirmayimas, ac per praesentes, 
pro nobis haeredibus et saccessoribasnostrisratificamasapprobamus 
et confirmamas Ordinationes et Statata praedicta ac omnia et 
singula priyilegia potestates autboritates et adyantagias quascunqae 
in eisdem contentas et specificatas. Et ulterius yolamos ac per 
praesentes pro nobis haeredibus et successoribus nostris plenam 
potestatem et authoritatem damns et concedimus Procancellario 
Uniyersitatis nostrae praedictae nunc et pro tempore existent! 
Sacramentum in eisdem Statutis mentionatum administraadum. 
Volumus insuper quod quilibet talis Professor juxta Statuta prae- 
dicta eligendus, si tempore electionis ejus socius fuerit alicujos 
Collegii officium Socii una cum officio Professoris habeat et retineat 
dum coelebs maneat, si yero adhuc non fuerit Socius et coelebs sit, 
Socius alicujus Collegii eum eligere yolentis eligatur et admittatur. 
Denique yolumus ac per praesentes pro nobis haeredibus et succes- 
soribus nostris concedimus, quod hae Literae nostrae Patentes yel 
irrotulamenta earundem erunt in omnibus et per omnia bona, 
firma, yalida, sufficientia et effectualia in lege non obstante male 
recitante yel non recte yel plene recitante praedictum Testamentum 
et ultimam yoluntatem praedicti The. Plume et Ordinationes et 
Statuta praedicta siye aliquam partem earundem, aut aliquam aliam 
Omissione, Imperfection^ defectu, re, caus^, yel materia qu&cunque 
in aliquo non obstante* In cujus rei testimonium has Literas 
nostras fieri fecimus Patentes. Teste meips^ apud Westmonas- 
terium undecimo die Junii Anno Begni nostri sexto. 

Per Breye de Priyato Sigillo, 

COCKS. 

4. Dr. Smith's Augmentation. 

Thb Rey. Robert Smith, D.D., Master of Trinity College, 
who died February 2, 1768, bequeathed to the Uniyersity of 



60 

Cambridge <f 3,500 stock, Old Soath Sea Annuities, and ap« 
pointed the Chancellor or Vice-Chancellor, the Master of Trinitj 
College, and the Lucasian, the Flumian and Lowndean Professors 
for the time being and their successors in the same offices, per- 
petual Trustees to receive and annually to distribute the interest 
of the said stock in the following manner, yiz. First, he desired 
them to accept of a handsome dinner once a year, as a small 
acknowledgment for their trouble in discharging the said Trust, 
the expence of which and all other necessary expences being 
deducted from the annual interest of the stock, he gave annually 
half the remainder upon a condition thereafter named to the 
Plumian Professor, as an addition to the small revenue of that 
Professorship which he had the honour to hold for many years; 
and the other half of that remainder he gave in equal portions 
as premiums to two junior Bachelors of Arts of the said Univer- 
sity, which, after ail the Candidates [of that year for those 
premiums had been examined by the Trustees, should appear to 
them the best proficients in Mathematics and Natural Philosophy : 
cceteris paribus he gave the preference to the Candidate of 
Trinity College aforesaid; And he desired that every year, 
while the Questionists were sitting for a Bachelor's degree, a 
printed advertisement might be fixed at the gate of every 
College, signifying the value of the premiums and the time and 
place of examination of the Candidates ; and as soon as the 
examination was ended, he directed that the two premiums 
should be paid to the two best proficients in Mathematics and 
Natural Philosophy, they giving the receipts in a book of account 
of the receipts and payments of the interest of the said Stock; 
after which, but not sooner, he declared that the said Plumian 
Professor should be entitled to the other half of that yearns inte- 
rest. And he empowered the said Trustees at any time, if they 
should think it advantageous to the said Benefaction, to sell out 
the said Stock, and with the price of it to purchase a freehold 
estate or estates in land, and to apply the rents of it annually to 
the purpose above-mentioned. 

N.B. The present Trustees are Dr. Whewell, Dr. King, Dr. 
Peacock, and Professor Challis; the deed of Trust bearing date 
July 21, 1847. 



61 



yil. Regius Professorship of Modern History. 



Letters Patent for the creation of the Modern History 

Professorship. 

1. Prima pars Patentum de anno regni Regis Georgii 

undedmo, 

Georoius Dei Gratia, &e. Omnibus ad quos &c. Salutem. 
Quum Academiae nostrae eo consilio institutae fuerint ut vires 
erudites et praestantes tarn in Reipublicae quam in Ecclesiae 
subsidium perpetua successiene suppeditarent quumque in hec 
regno utpete exteris natienibus per legationum feederum et com- 
mercierum vincula undequaque illigato varia extent munia quae noh 
medo accuratam illam veteris litteraturae veterumque linguarum 
peritiam quae tantd cum laude in Academiis nestris fleret sed etiam 
recentieris historiae scientiam linguarumque hodiernarum tarn in 
scribende quam in lequendo usum et facilitatem apprime deside- 
rent; quibus tamen addiscendis et excolendis nulla adhue in utrayis 
Academia preposita sunt praemia aut adjumenta; ex que de- 
fectu factum est ut bona juventutis ingenuae pars magne sue cum 
incemmede aut alienigenis statim educanda tradatur, aut studio- 
rum Academicorum stadie nendum cenfecte in partes exteras 
dimittatur utque homines peregrini destinata Academicis fayeris 
nestri testimonia necessitate quildam nonnunquam intercipiant. 
Sciatis igitur quod nes tot tantisque incemmedis mederi studentes 
Academiamque nestram Cantabrigiae (ad regum preavorum 
exemplum) nen tueri solum sed etiam ornare et augere cupientes 
de nostrd speciali gratia, scientia certd et mere motu creayi- 
mus, ereximus, ordinayimus, fecimus, constituimus et stabiliyimus 
perque has praesentes creamus, erigimus, erdinamus, facimus, 
constituimus et stabilimus in Academic nostrS Cantabrigiensi 
praedicta efficium siye munusPrefessoris in Modern^ Historia. Qui, 
quidem Professor yir erit iis dotibus eoque gradu in praedictS. 
nostrd Academid ornatus eoque mode ac forma nominandus, 
designandus atque admittendus ad dictum Professoris efficium, 



62 

quemadmodum a nobis per has praesentes inferius declaratur. 
Idemque Professor ea munia obibit iisque fungetur officiis talique 
gaudebit stipendio quemadmodum per has praesentes infra descri- 
bitur, yidelicet (1) Nos per has praesentes volumus, statuimus et 
mandamus quod Professor praedictus yir erit honestate morum ac 
prudentia laudabilis, quod gradum habebit vel Magistri in artibus 
yA Baecakorei in legibus vel aliquem altioris etiam ordinis in 
nostra praedicta Academia, quod nuncupabitur Professor Regius 
IR Mod»na Historia, quodque de tempore in tempus a nobis 
nominabitur ad idem Frofessoris Offidum per instrumentum manu 
nostra regi^ signatum. Quod quidem instrumentum Professor a 
nobis nominatus Vice Cancellario nostrae praedictae Academiae pro 
tempore existenti exhibebit, praestitoque juramento per has prae- 
sentes in eundem finem inferius declarando (quod juramentum prae- 
dictae nostrae Academiae Vice Cancellarius pro tempore existens 
pro authoritate per has praesentes sibi commissaadministrare man- 
datur) statim sine omni mora per praedictum Vice Cancellarium ad 
idem Professoris munus admittetur. Quod quidem tenebit ac pos- 
Bidebitperspatium unius anni integri a die admissionis suae com- 
putandi si mode tam diu vixerit. (2) Volumus praeterea perque has 
praesentes statuimus et mandamus quod Juramentum ab unoquoque 
hujusmodi Professore nostro ante admissionem suam ad praedictum 
munus praestandum his verbis concipietur, scilicet^ Ego A. B. nomi- 
natus Professor Regius Historiae Modernae jure me fideliter pro 
meo posse observaturum omnes ordinationes et statuta munus et 
offidum meum comsernentes. Sicut Dens me adjavet per Jesum 
Christum hoc sacro sancto Evangelio annunciatum. (3) Volumus 
praeterea per has praesentes statuimusque et concedimus quod Pro- 
fessor noster pro tempore existens habebit et recipiet stipendii 
loco annuam summam quadringentarum librarum bonae et legalis 
monetae MagnaeBritanniae yel sibi yel suis assignatisad Receptum 
Scaccarii nostri quod Westmonasterii est solrendarum aequalibus 
semestribus solutionibus, quarum prima fiet ad finem sex mensium 
calendariorum a die admissionis suae ad idem Professoris officium 
computandorum. (4) Volumus praeterea perque has praesentes 
statuimus, jubemus et mandamus quod praedictus noster Professor 
duos ad minimum Praeceptores sive Magistros eliget et stipendia 
idonea iisdem soppeditabit in praedictii. nostra AcademiA. Qui qui- 
dem Praeceptores siye Magistri linguas hodiernas ita callebunt ut 



63 

turn loquendi turn scribendi rationes accurate possint docere, prae- 
dictique nostri Professoris mandatis obtemperabunt, tenebunturque 
yiginti scholares praedictae nostrae Academiae in Unguis hodiernis 
gratis erudire. Yiginti autem hi scholares a nobis de tempore in 
tempus nominabuntur per instrumentum manu nostrS regisL muni- 
turn, a nobis etiam per simile Instrumentum de tempore in tempus 
pro nostro beneplacito amovendi. Horum etiam scholarium unus- 
quisque duos ad minimum annos in praedicta nostra Acad^nia 
antequam nominandus erit habebit completes (qui quidem anni 
dlerum numero a tempore matricidationis uniuscujusque in nostra 
praedicta Academia eomputabuntur) unicuique etiam horum schola- 
rium nostrorum licebit addiscendis Unguis modernis et Modernae 
Historiae ut supradictum est eousque operam dare donee tres annos 
in Academia nostri praedictil a tempore nominationis suae com- 
pleverit eadem ut prius annos computandi ratione observata nisi 
citius a nobis per Instrumentum manu nostrd regia signatum 
amoveatur. (5) Yolumus praeterea perque has praesentes statuimus 
et mandamusquod praedictus noster Professor semel ad minimum in 
unoquoque termino inde ab admissione sua de Moderna Historia in 
scholis publicis praedictae nostrae Academiae ad yiginti hos nostros 
scholares aliosque qui interfuerint publicam habebit praelectionem. 
Quibus yiginti propterea expresse praecipimus et mode quodam 
speciali mandamus ut hisce Professoris nostri lectionibus semper in- 
teresse meminerint. Yolumus etiam beneplacitumque nostrum est ut 
aUi etiam scholares in dicta nostrd Academia intersint dictis Profes- 
soris nostri in Moderna Historia praelectionibus pubUcis eo mode 
et secundum easdem regulas quibus alus praelectionibus publicis in 
Academia nostra praedicta adesse tenentur. (6) Yolumus praeterea 
perque has praesentes statuimus et mandamus quod praedictus 
noster Professor pubUcas has suas lectiones incipiat de optimis 
Historiae Modernae scriptoribus historicam faciendo narrationem 
monendoque yiginti nostros scholares aliosque qui interfuerint 
qua methodo quibusque authoribus legendis feUcissime hisce studiis 
progredi possint. (7) Yolumus praeterea perque has praesentes 
statuimus et mandamus quod udem praedicti yiginti scholares pro- 
fessorem nostrum praedictum tum euntem ad scholas pubUcas turn 
inde redeuntem deducent et comitabuntur quotiescunque praedic- 
tus noster Professor pubUcas suas de Historic Modern^ ut mode 
mandayimus habebit praelectiones. (8) Yolumus praeterea perque 



64 

has praesentes declaramus et mandamus quod si praedictus noster 
Professor per spatium uniuscujusvis termini integri ab admissione 
sua neglexerit aut omiserit in scholis publicis praedictae nostrae 
Academiae de Moderna Historic publico praelegere turn et eo in 
casu praedictus noster Professor ob singulas suas negligentias aut 
omissiones iisdem poenis pecuoiariis subjectus erit quibus caeteri 
Professores in praedict^ nostra Academia ob similes negligentias 
suas aut omissiones subjiciuntur, praedictaeque poenae in nostrum 
praedictum Modernae Historiae Professorem de tempore in tempus 
e^em authoritate infligentur atque eo modo exigentur eosdemque 
in usus erogabuntur ac similes poenae quae in caeteros praedictae 
nostrae Academiae Professores iisdem decausis infliguntur secundum 
leges et statuta quae in praesens yim obtinent in praedict& nostra 
Academia. Quibus legibus et statutis Tolumus, statuimus et man- 
damus praedictum nostrum Professorem pro tempore existentem in 
omnibus aliis rebus etiam subjici et teneri. (9) Yolumus praeterea 
perque has praesentes statuimus et mandamus quod praedictus 
noster Professor et praedicti linguarum hodiernarum magistri in 
praedicta Academia imprimis et praecipue cavebunt ne tempera 
aut horae quae ab iis ad erudiendos praedictos yiginti scholares in 
Moderna Historia Unguisque hodiernis destinabuntur eadem sint 
quae per leges Academiae ad alia studia sunt designata. Praeterea 
quod quiyis praedictorum viginti scholarium a nobis eo modo quo 
supradictum est nominatorum e Unguis hodiernis duas ad minimum 
addiscet et callebit. Item quod idem Professor noster praedictique 
magistri ad unum e Principalibus nostris States Secretariis nar- 
rationem quandam progressiks uniuscujusque dictorum scholarium 
manibus suis subscriptam singulis annis transmittet ut nos cer- 
tiores facti yel eos si qui fuerint qui studia haecce neglexerint 
amovere possimus vol dUigentiam industriamque eorum incitare 
qui sese aptos utilesque publicis rebus obeundis reddiderint domi 
forisve prout occasio tulerit munus aliquod idoneum iis assignando. 
(10) Yolumus praeterea perque hasce praesentes declaramus quod 
haeerunt in praesens leges nostrae, statuta et ordinationes tam prae- 
dictum nostrum Modernae Historiae Professorem spectantes quam 
Praeceptores sive Magistros linguarum hodiernarum scholaresque 
ad easdem addiscendas nominates ; Nobis tamen reservantes potes- 
tatem plenam authoritatemque easdem de tempore in tempus 
prout nobis idoneum congruumque visum fuerit mutandis expli- 



65 

candique per instrumentum manu nostra regi& sigilloque regio 
quod Tocatur le Privy Signet munitum, atque adjiciendi insuper 
ejnsmodi alias leges, statnta atque ordinationes quas yel tem- 
porum ratio postulaverit yel quas progrediente hac nostril regia 
institutione utiles magis ac necessarias fore constiterit, In cujus 
rei &c. Teste me ipso apud Westmonasterium yicesimo octavo die 
Septembris anno regni nostri undecimo. 

Per Breve de private sigillo. 

2. Qi^rta pars Patentum anno regni Regis Georgii secundi 

prima. 

Rbx omnibus ad quos &c. Salutem. Quandoquidem Georgius 
primus nuper rex pater noster beatissimae memoriae, per literas 
suas patentes sub magno sigillo sue Magnae Britanniae confectas, 
die vicesimo octavo mensis Septembris anno regni sui undecimo 
datas, in Academia sua Cantabrigiae officium sive munus Professoris 
in Moderna Historia creaverit, erexerit, ordinaverit, fecerit, consti- 
tuent et stabiliverit, itidemque per praedictas literas patentes 
quasdam leges, ordinationes, statuta atque mandata, tam ad officium 
supradictum sive munus Professoris in Moderna Historia, Prae- 
ceptores sive Magistros linguarum hodiernarum, Scholaresque in 
dictis Unguis erudiendos, quam ad nominationem dicti Professorb 
de tempore in tempus per instrumentum manu sua regia signatum, 
et ad nominationem et amotionem eorumdem Scholarium pro 
beneplacito sue per similia instrumenta manu sua regia munita 
spectantia fecerit, condiderit et sanciverit, uti ex iisdem Uteris 
patentibus inspectis plenius uberiusque Uquere potest, Nos tam 
honestum, tam laudabile tamque utile dicti patris nostri regu 
institutum plurimum comprobantes volentesque praedictam nostram 
Academiam Cantabrigiae hoc quoque favoris nostri regii testi- 
monio ornare, quo magis magisque ingenua juventus bonis artibus 
ibidem floreat et varia linguarum etiam hodiernarum cognitione 
aptius commodiusque perpoliatur, officium sive munus Professoris 
in Moderna Historia et leges, statuta, ordinationes atque man- 
data eodem pertinentes, prout in Uteris patentibus nuper patris 
nostri regu superius laudatis speciatim recensentur, in Academia 
nostra Cantabrigiensi de novo erigere et continuare decreyimus. 

5 



66 

SciATis igitur quod nos de gratia nostra special], certa scientia et 
mero motu officium sive munus Professoris in Modema Historia 
de novo ereximus^ constituimus, stabilivimus et confirmavimus, ac 
per basce praesentes de novo erigimus, constituimus, stabilimus et 
confirmamus in praedicta Academia nostra Cantabrigiae una cum 
hujusmodi legibus, statutist ordinationibus atque mandatis, tarn ad 
dictum officium sive munus Professoris nostri regii, Praeceptores 
sive Magistros linguarum hodiernarum, Scholaresque de tempore in 
tempus in Unguis hodiernis et Moderna Historia erudiendos, quam 
ad nominationemdicti Professoris nostri regii pro tempore existentis 
per instrumentum manu nostra regia signaJdum, ac ad nomina- 
iTonem et amotionem eorundem Senium pro tempore existen- 
tium pro nostro beneplacito per similia instrumenta manu nostra 
regia munienda spectantibus, prout in Uteris patentibus supra- 
dictisampUus continentur; yolumusque ulterius ut omnia et singula 
in praefatis Uteris patentibus express* eamdem yim vlgoremque 
obtineant, ac si a nobis ac in nomine nostro regie ab initio ordinata 
atque instituta fuerint, nobis tamen reseryantes potestatem ple- 
namque auctoritatem easdem leges, statuta, ordinationes atque 
mandata de tempore in tempus prout nobis idoneum congruum- 
que visum fuerit mutandi expUcandique per instrumenta manu 
nostra regia sigiUoque regie quod vocatur le Privy Signet 
munita, atque adjiciendi insuper ejusmodi alias leges, statuta atque 
ordinationes, quas vel temporum ratio postulaverit vel quas pro- 
grediente hac nostra regia institutione utiles magis ac necessarias 
fore constiterit. In cujus rei &c. Teste rege apud West- 
monasterium undecimo die ApriUs. 

Per Breve de private sigiUo. 



67 



VIII. WOODWARDIAN PROFESSORSHIP. 

Extract from the Will of Dr. Woodward. 

Dated Oct. 1, 1727. 

My Will is, that my Executors, as soon as convenientljr may Lands of i5o 
be, do purchase lands, tenements, and hereditaments in fee-simple, S^i!! to^^ 
situate, lying and being in some good part of South Britain^ of S^d^conveyed 
the yearly yalue of one hundred and fifty pounds; and that after venity: 
such purchase made, they do convey and assure the same to and 
upon the University of Cambridge: I mean, the Chancellor, 
Masters and Scholars of that University, for ever, in such manner 
and form, and by such proper terms and conveyances, as counsel 
learned in the law shall for that purpose advise and direct; the 
sum of one hundred pounds thereout to be paid yearly and every of which loo 
year to a Lecturer, to be chosen, for the purpose herein-after E^unr. 
specified, by my executors, the survivors or survivor of them;^|a£by 
and from and after their decease, by the Lord Archbishop of the J^'^J^gby 
province in which the said University of Cambridge is, who, it SSiopJ'&c. 
is to be presumed, besides his favouring of learning and all useful 
knowledge, will think himself under obligation to have special 
regard to this University; and, for still the same reason, by the 
Lord Bishop of the diocese, in which the said University is, by 
the President of the College of Physicians, and by the President 
of the Royal Society of London, by the two Representatives, or 
Members from time to time elected and serving in Parliament for 
the said Umversity, by the whole Senate, (that is to say) the 
Chancellor and Vice-Chancellor of the said University, the Pro- 
vosts, Masters and Heads of the several Colleges and Halls for 
the time being; the Doctors, Masters of Arts, and all who have 
a right of voting for Members of Parliament, representing the 
said University; or a majority of the above specified illustrious 
and excellent persons. And it is my request to them, that in 

5 — 2 



68 

consideration of the benefits which may thence accrue to the 
public, they will be pleased to take upon them the care and 
guardianship hereof; and that they will make choice only of such 
men for reading the Lectures herein-after specified and directed, 
as have distinguished themselves by their learning, their virtue, 
Archbishop, their judgment and great abilities. And in case that it shall 
cr^n^£iior, happen by reason of age, sickness, or absence from the Univer- 
dSt8,^d sity, the said Archbishop, Bishop, Chancellor, or either of the two 
Parliament Mcmbcrs of Parliament, or of the two Presidents above-men- 
proxy, tioned, cannot be present and give their attendance at the time 
that any election is to be made, it is my will and intention, that 
any of these electors, so absent, may appoint a proxy to assist 
and give a vote at that election. And I Will that the first 
Lecturer be chosen as soon as may well be after my decease, and 
Lecturer to that all the succeediug Lecturers be from time to time chosen 
within two after each vacancy or removal of the predecessor or former Lec- 

nionths after • * 

eachvacancy. turer, withiu the space of two months at farthest; the Vice- 
Chancellor causing public notice to be timely given by billets 
fixed up in the Public Schools, and by advertisements printed in 
the Gazette, or some other like authentic public newspaper. And 
To be a my Will is that none be chosen but bachelors, or men that have 
not been married, and in case of the marriage of any of the said 
Lecturers afterwards, his election shall be thereby immediately 
made void, lest the care of a wife and children should take the 
Lecturer too much from study, and the care of the Lecture. 
Layman be And my Will further is, that if a divine shall at any time happen 
EiviLe. ^ to be a competitor with a layman for this Lectureship, in case the 
latter shall be as well qualified, he shall ever have preference of 
the former; not out of any disrespect to the Clergy, (for whom I 
have ever had a particular regard) but because there is in this 
kingdom better provision, and a much greater number of prefer- 
ments for the clergy, than for men of learning among the laity. 
Lecturers to And my Will is, that all such Lecturers shall from time to time 
ordCTs.****** be further subject to such rules, orders and directions (not inter- 
fering with those herein-after particularly specified and set forth) 
as the electors, or a majority of them shall from time to time think 
To have no fit to make. And my Will is, that no one shall at any time be chosen 
ment. Lccturor who then hath any preferment, office or post whatever, 
that shall any ways so employ or take up his time as to interfere 



69 

with his duty herein set fordi, and particularly that shall require 
his attendance out of the University. And in case of any of the 
Lecturers after he is chosen shall accept of any such preferment, 
office or post, his election shall be thereby made void, and another 
chosen in his room. And it is further my intent and meaning, 
and 1 do hereby Will and order, that such Lecturer from time to 
time so to be appointed and chosen by my executors, the sur- 
vivors and survivor of them, so long as any of them shall be 
living, and afterwards to be chosen by a majority of those excel- 
lent and illustrious persons above-mentioned, shall reside in the Must reside, 
said University of Cambridge, and never be absent from the a^se^t above 

•^ ' , two Months 

same above the space of two months in the year, and those to be va^uon* 
in the long vacation in the summer. And that the said Lecturer fou?Llrturcs 
shall there read at least four Lectures every year, at such times ©ne'J/which 
and in such place of the said University as the majority of the ^^^^p'^"*'^** 
said electors should appoint, on some one or other of the subjects 
treated of in my Natural History of the Earthy my Defence of 
it against Dr. Camekarius, my Discourse of Vegetation^ or my 
State of Physick, at his discretion; but in such language, viz, 
English or Latin, as shall be appointed from time to time by the 
ChanceUor, Vice-Chancellor, Provosts and Masters of the several 
Colleges and Halls belonging to the said University, the said 
Lectures, or at least one of them, at the Lecturer's own free 
choice and election, to be published in print every year. 

Item. I give and bequeath my original Collection of English JJ^^Jl,^^]^®^ 
Fossils, contained in two of my Cabinets marked with the several ^^^^ g^" 
letters A and B, and also the said two Cabinets with the Cata- ^^'^y* 
logues of the said Fossils, which I have drawn up, to the said 
University of Cambridge. And my Will is, that as soon as may 
well be after my Decease, my executors or the survivor of them, 
do cause and procure the same to be lodged and reposited in such 
proper Room or Apartment as shall be allotted by the said 
University, to the satisfaction of my executors or the survivor of 
them. And my Will further is, that the said Lecturer from time The Lecturer 
to time to be chosen, shall have the care and custody of all the (^st^y of 
said Fossils, and the catalo&:ues of them, and that he do live and have an 

^ apartnien t 

reside in or near the said apartment so to be allotted for repo- JJJi^J^ 
siting the said Fossils as above-mentioned in the said University; fi^y^i^S^ 
and that he be actually ready and attending in the room where ^®®^**^*"*- 



70 



Twoiiupeo- 
tors to exa- 
mine once a 
{rear the col- 
ection of 
Fossils, of 
which cata- 
logues to be 
kept in the 
Public Li- 
brary. 



The inspec- 
tors to nave 
five pounds 
apiece for 
their pains. 



Lecturer 
must give 
security. 



To be allow- 
ed 10 pounds 
perann. for 
experiments, 
correspond- 
ences, &c. 



they are reposited, from the hour of nine of the clock in the 
morning to eleven, and again from the hour of two in the after- 
noon till four, three days in every week (except during the two 
months in the long Vacation, wherein he is allowed to be absent 
as above-mentioned) to shew the said Fossila gratis, to all such 
curious and inteUigent persons as shall desire a view of them, for 
their information and instruction; and that he himself shall be 
always present when they are shewn, and take care that none of 
the said Fossils are mutilated or lost. And I desire the said 
Chancellor, yice-Chancellor, Provosts and Masters of the several 
Colleges and Halls, or a majority of them, that before the admis- 
sion of every Lecturer, and likewise afterwards once every year, 
they do appoint two discreet and careful persons who shall inspect 
and examine the said Collection of Fossils, and compare them 
with the catalogues; of which I Will, that besides those to be 
kept by the Lecturer, there be copies reposited in the Public 
Library of the said University, for greater security, that the said 
Fossils be preserved with due care and faithfulness; and that 
the said two persons to be appointed to inspect and examine the 
same, shall give under their hand a report of their examination 
thereof, their comparing them with the said catalogues, and the 
state and condition in which they are kept, and whether any of 
them are lost or mutilated; for which their care and trouble, I 
desire and direct that five pounds apiece be annually paid them 
out of the estate in fee above directed, to be purchased and con- 
veyed to the uses and trusts of this my Will. And to the end 
that the said Fossils may be preserved and kept with the greater 
care and faithfulness, it is my Will, that the Lecturer and keeper 
of them from time to time shall before his admission give such 
security as my executors and the survivor of them, and after the 
decease of such survivor, the succeeding electors shall think 
proper. And I further Will that the sum of ten pounds shall be 
yearly and every year paid to the Lecturer above-mentioned, out 
of the rents of the said estate in fee, to be laid out and employed 
by him, from time to time, in making observations and experi- 
ments, keeping correspondence with learned men on the sub- 
jects directed to be treated of in the Lectures, and in procuring 
additions to the Collections of Fossils, or in which of them each 
Lecturer for the time being shall think fit; he rendering annually 



71 
to such of the electors as shall be in the UniTersity an account in AccounttUa 

* to the electors 

writing in which of the ways the said sum of ten pounds hath ^<^^- 
been employed and disbursed. And I further Will and direct, Ten pounds 
that out of the annual rents of the said estate in fee, the sum of adi^'fim 

of May. 

ten pounds annually for ever be appropriated and allowed for 
Dinner on the first day of May; or if this fall on a Sunday, then 
on the second day of May, for the said Lecturer, two Inspectors, 
or Examiners, and the said Chancellor, Yice-Chancellor, Provost 
and Masters of the said Colleges and Halls of the said Uniyersity ; 
to the end that they may then consider of methods to improve the 
design and use of the said donation by me hereby made. And I 
greatly wish that these things that are of so much use and 
importance, and which I have with great diligence and expence 
collected, may by this settlement, the care of the electors, and 
the diligence of the Lecturer, be made serviceable to the setting 
forth the wisdom of God in the works of Nature; to the advance- 
ment of useful knowledge, and to the profit and benefit of the 
public. And it is my further Will and intention, that the surplus The re. 
and residue of the annual rents of the said estate in fee, after the my uxe^ 
salary to the Lecturer, the ten pounds per annum to the two "f^ ^^^^ 
inspectors or examiners, the ten pounds per annum for cor- 
respondence and experiments, and the ten pounds per annum for 
the dinner first paid and satisfied; I say that all the surplus and 
residue of the said annual rents shall go and belong to the said 
University for ever, for the payment of taxes, or any other neces- 
sary contingencies. But in case any surplus should remain, after 
such taxes and contingencies paid, that then such surplus bedisposed 
of yearly and every year, in such manner as the said University 
shall think fit: but in hopes, that for the honour of the University, 
and the benefit that will thence accrue to the public, if the design 
of this donation be rightly carried on; that the said University 
will be pleased to dispose of the said residue in making experi- 
ments and observations, in correspondence, in natural collections, 
books, or other things that may serve to the promoting the good 
ends of this donation. But in case the said taxes should at any if the taxes 
time amount to more than the said sum of twenty pounds, being ^^nd!^ 
the residue of the said sum of one hundred and fifty pounds Lecturer to 

* pay the over- 

hereby bequeathed to the said University ; then my Will and ?*"«»• 
intention is, that the Lecturer shall pay such overplus of the said 



72 

p»toafc>i- taxes out of his said salary. And further it is my will and 

abS**"*^' ii^tention, that any Lecturer not doing his duty, and acquitting 

himself rightly to their satisfaction, shall be removable at the 

discretion of the electors or the majority of them, and another 

chosen in his place; his salary to commence from the quarter-day 

Lecturer to next cnsuins the death or removal of his predecessor. And I do 

be paid quar* *^ . , * , 

teriy. hereby order, will and direct that the above-mentioned salary 

of one hundred pounds per annum, herein-before limited and 
appointed as a provision for the said Lecturer, be paid and 
satisfied to him from time to time by four even quarterly pay- 
ments, at and upon the four usual feast days or days of 
payment in the year; (that is to say) the Feast of the Annun- 
ciation of the Blessed Virgin Mary^ the Nativity of St. John the 
Baptist^ the Feast of Saint Michael the Archangel, and the 
ifnot paid in Nativity of Christ; and in case of default of payment of the 
S^y"dteto?in. Said sum of one hundred pounds per annum, for his salary, and 
the sum of ten pounds per annum, for the uses above-mentioned 
out of the said lands, or estate so purchased and conveyed as 
above specified, to the Lecturer to whom it shall become due by 
the space of six months, after any of the days of payment 
whereon it is directed to be paid as aforesaid: it shall and may 
be lawful for that Lecturer to distrain for such arrears of his 
said salary: and if there be not sufficient by such distress, to 
pay himself the said arrears, that he shall and may sue for 
them, and enter upon the said estate settled for support of the 
Lecturer, and hold and keep the same till his arrears be paid, 
or till he accept another place or office, or be absent from the 
University, or neglect to read or print the Lectures as is therein 
for that purpose particularly specified. 



Execators of the above Will, 

The Hon. DIXIE WINDSOR, Esq. 
HUGH BETHEL, 1 ^ 
RICHARD GRAHAM, j ^^^' 
Col. RICHARD KING. 



73 



IX. LowNDBAN Professorship of Astronomy and Geometry. 

The following is an Extract of the portion of Mr. Lowndes' 
Will which relates to his Professorship: — 

''I give and devise all my estates at Overton, and all my 
lands and hereditaments in Smallwood and elsewhere in the 
county of Chester, and all other my real estates, unto the 
Chancellor, Masters, and Scholars of the University of Cambridge, 
and their successors for ever, subject, nevertheless, to such just 
debts as my personal estate shall not be able to pay, upon trust 
that they shall for ever pay all the clear rents and profits of my 
said real estates annually to the support and maintenance of a 
Professor of Astronomy and Geometry in the said University of 
Cambridge, after deducting thereout all costs, charges, and 
expenses of executing the said trust hereby in them reposed, 
and all taxes, repairs, and other outgoings; which Professor I 
will shall be for ever called Lowndes** Astronomical and Geome- 
trical Professor in the University of Cambridge, and shall be 
from time to time chosen and appointed by the Lord High 
Chancellor, Lord Keeper of the Great Seal of Great Britain, the 
Lord President of the Privy Council, the Lord Privy Seal, the 
Lord High Treasurer, or the First Lord Commissioner of the 
Treasury, the Lord Steward of the King^s Household for the time 
being, or the major part of them. And I will and desire that 
proper statutes, rules, and ordinances in relation to the said 
Professorship, and the number of the lectures to be read therein, 
and the times for such reading, and all other regulations for the 
perpetual government of the said Professorship, shall be made 
by and under the hands and seals of the Right Honourable 
Thomas Earl of Macclesfield, Martin Ffolkes, Esq., President of 
the Royal Society, Dr. Bradley, and my much-honoured friend 
William Jones, Esq., of Beaufort-buildings; which statutes and 
ordinances shall be for ever binding to the said Professors." 



74 



X. Foundations of Mr. Norris. 

1. Order of the Lord Chancellor for Payment of the Annuity t 
directed by the Will of John Norris, Esq, of Witton, 
Norfolk. 

Saturday the 3rd day of November, in the 22Qd year of the 
reign of His Majesty King George the Third, 1781, between 
Charlotte Laura Norris an Infant by her next friend, Plaintiff, 
Thomas Fauquier, Esq. and Charlotte his wife, late Charlotte 
Norris, Widow, Thomas Berney Bramston, Esq., Bramp- 
ton Dillingham, Ourdon Dillingham, Esq., Thomas Glover 
Ewen, Gent., Thomas Brograve, Esq., the Chancellor, Mas- 
ters, and Scholars of the University of Cambridge, John 
Ewen, Charlotte Caroline Ewen, Widow, and His Majesty's 
Attorney-General, Defendants, and between the said Thomas 
Glover Ewen, Plaintiff, the said Charlotte Laura Norris by 
her Guardian, Thomas Fauquier, and Charlotte his Wife, 
Thomas Berney Bramston, Brampton Dillingham, Gurdon Dil- 
- lingham, Thomas Brograve, the said Chancellor, Masters and 
Scholars, of the University of Cambridge, and His Majesty^s 
Attorney-General, Defendants. 

Whereas the Defendants, the Chancellor, Masters and Scholars 
of the University of Cambridge did on the 28th day of July 
last prefer their Petition unto the Right Honourable the Lord 
High Chancellor of Great Britain, setting forth. That John 
Norris, late of Witton in the County of Norfolk, Esq., deceased, 
by his Will in writing dated the 26th day of June 1770, 
amongst other things devised his Messuage or Tenement, Farm 
and Lands, called Broomholme Priory Farm or the Abbey 
Farm in Bacton, in the said County of Norfolk, or some other 
town or towns, place or places thereto near or adjoining, and 
all great Tythes whatsoever arising on such part of the said 
Farm and Lands as is lying in Bacton aforesaid, then or late in 
the occupation of Richard Gaze or his undertenants at the 
yearly rent of <£ 190, together with all appurtenances thereto 
belongmg unto the Defendants Thomas Berney Bramston, 



76 

Brampton Dillingham, Gurdon Dillingham, Thomas Glover Ewen, 
and Thomas Brograve and their heirs, to and for the several uses 
and purposes following, that is to say, to the use and intent that the 
said Chancellor, Masters and Scholars and their successors should 
and might for ever have, receive, and take thereout and out of 
every or any part thereof upon trust as after mentioned, an an- 
nuity or yearly rent-charge of <f 120 clear of all taxes and other 
deductions whatsoever, to be paid from time to time on the 24th 
day of every June (except the first June) after the institution of 
the Professorship by him intended to be established, and referred 
to in a book covered with marble paper after mentioned, should 
take effect with the usual powers of distress and entry for receiv- 
ing and compeUing payment of the said annnity or yearly rent- 
charge of £120, and all arrears thereof and all costs, charges, 
damages and expenses occasioned by the nonpayment of the 
same ; and the said John Norris thereby declared that the said 
Chancellor, Masters and Scholars and their successors should 
from time to time for ever stand and be seized and possessed of 
the said annuity or yearly rent-charge of £120, and of the said 
powers and remedies for recovery thereof upon special trust and 
confidence and to the intent and purpose that they should from 
time to time for ever pay, apply and dispose of the same and 
every part thereof to such person or persons upon such trusts 
and for such purpose or purposes, and at such time and times, 
and in such parts and shares, and under and subject to such 
conditions, forfeitures, and restrictions, and in such manner as 
are expressed, declared and contained in the first 20 pages 
of a small book covered with marble paper, wholly of his own 
handwriting in his said will mentioned, and subject to and charged 
and chargeable with the said annuity or yearly rent-charge of 
^120, and the powers and remedies aforesaid for the recovery 
thereof; the said Testator by his said will declared that the said 
Trustees and their heirs should stand seized of the said Messuage 
Farm, Lands, Tythes and Hereditaments, with the Appurte- 
nances thereof in trust for his right heirs and assigns for ever, 
and he did thereby positively direct that the said annuity or 
yearly rent-charge of £120, or any part thereof, should not at 
any time or under any pretence whatsoever be applied or dis- 
posed of in any manner or to any person or persons, or for any 



76 

purpose or purposes in any wise differing from the plan or direc- 
tions for the application or disposition thereof, contained in the 
book of his own handwriting therein before mentioned, and that 
if it should happen that the whole or any part of the said an- 
nuity or yearly rent-charge should not be applied for the pur- 
pose for which the same was by his said book directed to be 
applied, no more of the annuity or yearly rent-charge than 
should be actually applied for such respective purposes, and no 
other, should be raised or paid, but the residue thereof should 
from time to time sink into the estate whereout the same was 
therein before made payable, regard being had to the directions 
contained in his said book concerning the determination or non- 
payment of the said annuity in the whole or in any part ; and in 
order the better to perpetuate both in the said Chancellor, 
Masters and Scholars of the University of Cambridge and their 
successors, and also in the persons who should for the time being 
be entitled to the estate whereout the said annuity or yearly 
rent-charge of £120, was so made payable, the full knowledge of 
all the particulars of his plan and directions for the application 
and disposition of the said annuity or yearly rent-charge, and 
that the same might be strictly and fully complied with and ob- 
served, he thereby further directed that his book wherein he 
wrote with his own hand such plans and directions should as 
soon as convenient after his decease be delivered into the hands 
of the said Chancellor, Masters and Scholars, and should from 
thenceforth for ever remain in the possession of them and their 
successors for safe custody, and that they should deliver a true 
and exact copy thereof, carefully examined by the Masters of 
some two Colleges within the said University, and attested as 
such under the hands of such two Masters and under the Com- 
mon Seal of the said University, to the person or persons who 
should immediately on his death be equitably or beneficially 
entitled to the freehold of and in his said Farm, Lands and 
Tythes, whereout the said annuity or yearly rent-charge of £120 
was therein before made payable, so that the same copy might be 
kept for ever in the custody of the person or persons who should 
for the time being be so entitled to the said Farm, Land and 
Tythes, subject to the said annuity or yearly rent-charge as 
aforesaid. That the said John Norris died on the 5th of January 



77 

1777, without having revoked or altered his said Will re- 
lating to the disposition aforesaid, leaving the said Plaintiff 
Charlotte Laura Norris his only child and heir-at-law. That 
these causes were heard on the 25th of March 1778, before the 
Right Honourable the late Lord Chancellor, when the Council* 
for the Plaintiff Charlotte Laura Norris undertaking with leave 
of the Court to bring an ejectment against the tenant in possession 
of the said Farm called the Abbey Farm, in order to try the 
validity of the aforesaid Will, and other Testamentary writings 
in the pleadings mentioned, and to proceed to trial of such 
ejectment at the then next Summer Assizes for the County of 
Norfolk, It was ordered that the Bill brought in the first cause 
should be retained till the first day of the then next Michaelmas 
Term, and that the said Plaintiff Charlotte Norris should be at 
liberty to bring such ejectments, and proceed to trial thereon 
within the time aforesaid, and any of the parties were to be at 
liberty to appear by Council to defend such ejectment in the 
name of the tenant ; and it was referred to Mr. Earoes, one of the 
Masters of this Court, to take an account of the personal estate 
of the said Testator John Norris not specifically bequeathed, come 
to the hands or use of the said Thomas Glover Ewen, and also 
to take an account of the debts and funeral expenses of the said 
Testator : And it was further ordered that the Receiver appointed 
in these causes should be continued and pass his accounts before 
the said Master, and that the said Receiver should, out of the 
rents and profits pay the said Defendant Charlotte Norris, Widow, 
her rent-charge of £800 a year, and that he should thereout 
also pay what should be allowed for the maintenance and educa- 
tion of the said Charlotte Laura Norris the Infant, and that he 
should pay the balance from time to time into the Bank with 
the privity of the Accountant-General of this Court, to be placed 
to the credit of these causes, the said Charlotte Laura Norris the 
Infantas account, and that the. same when so paid should be 
placed out in Bank £3 per cent. Annuities in the name and with 
the privity of the said Accountant-General in trust in these 
causes, the same account subject to the further order of this 
Court; and the consideration of the costs of those suits and of all 
further directions was reserved until after the said trial, or the 
said Master should have made his report. That an ejectment was 



78 

brought in pursuance of the said decree on the demise of the 
said Charlotte Laura Norris the Infant, for recovery of the pos- 
session of the said Farm, called the Abbey Farm, and upon trial 
of such ejectment the Jury found a special verdict, stating the 
said Will, and in a general and short manner the book covered 
with marble paper, referred unto by the said Will, and that the 
said John Norris married, and had issue the Plaintiff Charlotte 
Laura Norris, after the making of his said Will, and also stating 
two other writings, signed by him as wills after the making of the 
said Will, dated the 26th day of June 1770, and such special 
verdict having been argued in the Court of King's Bench in 
Michaelmas Term, in the said year 1778, judgment was there- 
upon given in favour of the said Will dated the 26th day of June 
1770. That by another decree in these causes, dated the 25th of 
February 1779 (being after the said trial and verdict), it was de- 
clared that the said Will of the said Testator John Norris, dated 
the 26th of June 1770, was well proved, and that the same ought 
to be established, and the trusts thereof performed and carried 
into execution, and the same was decreed accordingly as to the 
yearly rent-charge of <f 120, directed to be paid by the said 
Will to the Petitioners, the Chancellor, Masters and Scholars of 
the University of Cambridge, on the 24th day of every June 
(except the first June) after the institution of the Professorship in 
the Will mentioned and referred to. It was amongst other things 
ordered that the Petitioners should be at liberty to apply to this 
Court for payment thereof when such Professorship should have 
been instituted according to the directions of the said Will. That 
the said John Norris at the time of his death left a book covered 
with marble paper, all of his own handwriting, and containing 
upwards of 20 pages, and in the first 20 pages of such book he 
fully described the nature of the Professorship which he meant 
to be instituted and established in the said University, and the 
manner of electing and appointing the person to be the Professor 
from time to time, and the persons to whom and the purposes 
for which such yearly sum of £120 should be from time to time 
paid and applied by the Petitioners, and particularly after taking 
notice of a part of a particular sermon preached by Dr. Porteus 
at Cambridge, in the year 1767, in the followbg words, that is 
to say, ** If there be any defect in the plan of education adopted in 



79 






it 



this place^ it is perhaps this^ that revealed religion has not yet 
a proper rank assigned it here amongst the other initiatory 
sciences, it is not made an indispensable qualification for acade- 
" mical honours and rewards, has not in short all that regard 
paid to it which its own intrinsic worth, and the peculiar cir- 
cumstances at present attending it, may seem to demand :" he 
the said John Norris thereby declared that such sentiments 
corresponded with his, and that he was disposed to found an in- 
stitution for that purpose, and that therefore he intended by his 
Will to give a clear annuity of £120 in manner aforesaid, and 
payable out of such estate as aforesaid, but that he meant that 
the owner of such estate for the time being should be at liberty 
to lodge an appeal in some of the Law Courts, complaining of any of 
the terms on which such annuity was intended not being fulfilled, 
and the said John Norris thereby divided the said annuity into 
four parts ; first, for the Professor's salary, £105 ; the second 
for the Academical Honour or reward, £12 ; the third for an 
annual sermon, £2 28. ; and the last, for books, ISs. And he 
thereby directed that there should be established in the said 
University of Cambridge a Professor of revealed religion, the 
professor of which should be styled the Revelation Professor, or 
the Norrisian Professor, and that such Professor should be sub- 
ject to the conditions therein mentioned, and that such Professor 
should take and subscribe a particular oath therein mentioned, 
and should read lectures of such kind as therein mentioned, on 
such number of days, and under such restrictions as to the par- 
ticular times as therein mentioned, and subject to certain for- 
feitures of parts or part of the said salary of £105, in case of 
such Professor failing to read lectures at any of such times as 
therein mentioned ; and the said John Norris in and by the said 
book directed that the yearly sum of £12 should be paid as a 
reward for the best prose English Essay on some of such reli- 
gious subjects as therein mentioned, of which £12, £7 4«. was 
to be expended in a gold medal, according to the description 
therein contained, and the remaining £4 ISs. to be laid out in 
books for the author of such Essay, and the said John Norris 
thereby durected that the ssdd yearly sum of £2 2s. should be 
paid for an annual sermon in the said University Church, on a 
subject having some reference to revelation, and on a particular day 



80 

therein mentioned by the said Professor for the time being, or 
snch person as he should appoint, but if such sermon should not 
be publicly published in print within four weeks from the time 
of preaching the same, such two guineas should not be paid out 
of the said estates ; and the said John Norris in and by such 
book directed that the said yearly sum of 188. should be laid out 
in religious books, to be distributed amongst persons confined 
in some gaol, spinning, or workhouse, or cage belonging to the 
said ITniversity, and the said John Norris thereby declared, that 
if the said institution should not take place from any nonconfor- 
mity in the Petitioners within twenty-four months from the day 
of his death, it should not afterwards, but the whole annuity of 
£120 should lapse and be ever afterwards irrecoverable. That 
John Hey, Doctor in Diyinity, was elected to the aforesaid Pro- 
fessorship on the first day of May 1780, (being within twenty- 
four months after the date of the aforesaid decree establishing 
the said will of the said John Norris,) and that the said John 
Hey hath ever since been in the said Professorship, and he hath 
in all respects conformed himself to the rules and conditions pre- 
* scribed in the said book covered with marble paper, and several 
essays were in the year between the 24th of June 1780 and 
the 24th of June last offered according to the directions of the 
said John Norris, and the adjudication of superior merit was made 
to the author of one of those essays, whereby such person be- 
came entitled to such medal, of the value of £7 4^. and to books 
to the amount of £4 16^., and the sum of ISs, was, before the 
24th day of June last, laid out in books, which were distributed 
amongst such prisoners as aforesaid, but that the said sermon 
hath not been preached nor is it likely to be at any time here- 
after preached, on account of the injunction to print and publish 
the same, no person been willing to preach the same under such 
injunction, by reason of the expence of such printing. That the 
said Abbey Farm, whereout the aforesaid clear annuity of £120 
was directed by the said will of the said John Norris to be paid, 
being let at the yearly rent of £190 as aforesaid, produces 
yearly in clear money much more thaa the said annuity of £120, 
and a Receiver, appointed by this Court in these causes, hath 
been from time to time, and still is, in receipt of the rents and 
profits of the said Farm, amongst other the real estates late of 



81 

the said John Norris, which are of large yearly value, and he 
hath now a considerable sum of money in respect of the rents 
and profits of the said estates remaining in his hands. That 
under the circumstances aforesaid the Petitioners are advised 
that the sum of £117 18^. for a year's payment of the said an- 
nuity of £120 to the 24th day of June now last, (deducting the 
said £2 28. intended for a sermon) ought to be paid to the 
Petitioners by the said Receiver, and that such clear yearly sum 
of £117 18^. ought to be paid by such Receiver for the time to 
come on every 24th day of June to the Petitioners in discharge 
of the said annuity or yearly sum of £120 after the like deduc- 
tion, and therefore praying that Thomas Glover Ewen, Gentle- 
man, the present Receiver of the rents of the said Farm called 
the Abbey Farm, and of the other real estates, late of the 
said John Norris, might pay to the Petitioners the sum of 
£117 18^. for a year's payment of the said clear annuity of 
£120, after such deduction as aforesaid, to the 24th day 
of June last, and that the said Thomas Glover Ewen, or the 
Receiver of the said estates for the time being, might hereafter 
pay such yearly sum of o£*ll7 18^. on every 24th day of June 
to the Petitioners, on the like account, the Petitioners under- 
taking to apply the said yearly sum of £105, £12, and 18^., 
making together the said yearly sum of £117 18^., according 
to the aforesaid directions of the said Testator John Norris : 
Whereupon all parties concerned were ordered to attend hia 
Lordship on the matter of the said Petition this day, and Council 
for the Petitioners and for all the other parties this day attend- 
ing, accordingly upon hearing the said Petition, the Will of the 
said Testator, dated the 26th day of June 1770, the Decree 
dated the 25th of March 1778, the Order dated the 25th of 
February 1779, the marble covered book referred to by the 
said WiU, two affidavits of John Hey, Doctor in Divinity, and 
an affidavit of George Borlase, Clerk, read, and of what was 
alleged by the Council for the said parties, and the Council for 
all the other parties consenting to the prayer of the said Petition 
for those who have attained their age of 21 years, and not op- 
posing the same on behalf of such as are Infants, His Lordship 
doth order that the said Thomas Glover Ewen, the present 
Receiver of the rents of the said Farm called the Abbey Farm, 

6 



82 

and of the other real estates, late of the said John Norris, do 
pay to the Petitioners the sum of one hundred and seventeen 
pounds eighteen shillings for a year's payment of the said clear 
annuity of one hundred and twenty pounds after such deduction 
as aforesaid, to the 24th day of June last, and that the said 
Thomas Glover Ewen, or the receiver of the said estates for the 
time being, do hereafter pay such yearly sum of one hundred and 
seventeen pounds eighteen shillings, on every 24th day of June, 
to the Petitioners on the like account, the Petitioners undertaking 
to apply the said yearly sums of one hundred and five pounds, 
twelve pounds and eighteen shillings, making together the said 
yearly sum of one hundred and seventeen pounds eighteen shil- 
lings, according to the directions of the said Testator John 
Norris, as by the said petition is desired. 

2. A Copy of what is written in the Book covered with Marble 
Paper all of the Testator'^s otvn handwriting. 

It was a great pleasure for me to find (in one of the B,e- 
views) the following extract from Dr. Porteus's Sermon in 1767, 
preached at Cambridge. 

'< If there be any defect in the Plan of Education adopted 
in this place, it is perhaps in this — that Revealed Religion has 
not yet a proper rank assigned it here amongst the other in- 
itiatory Sciences, is not made an indispensable qualification for 
academical honours and rewards, has not, in short, all that 
regard psdd to it which its own intrinsic worth, and the peculiar 
circumstances at present attending it, may seem to demand." 
These sentiments corresponded with mine, formed many months 
earlier than the date of my first seeing this Extract. And I 
hope it will please the Lord Jesus Christ to prosper an Institution 
designed to promote His pure and holy Religion, and to accept 
my praise and adoration for the bias on my mind to the form- 
ation of such a design, and bestowing on me the pecuniary 
means of accomplishing it. 

It is my fixed purpose to secure by Will an Annuity of One 
hundred and twenty pounds unto the University of Cambridge, 
out of my Estate or Farm, called the Abbey Farm or Bromholme 
Priory, tenanted by Richard Gaze, situated in the Parish of 
Bacton and adjacent parishes, and let under a lease granted by 



83 

the late Mr. Branthwait or his Executors, at a rent of £190, 
to secure the said annuity of £120, (but always subject to, 
and dependent upon, the accomplishment of the conditions here- 
inafter explained) as a perpetuity. The names of the persons 
unto whom I shall give by Will the said Farm of £190 a year, 
in trust for the payment of the above Annuity of £120 will be 
inserted in such Will ; and the persons whom I would conjoin 
with them for the better carrying the plan into execution, and 
who may be called the Stewards of the Institution, as the others 
are the Trustees, are 

The Master of Trinity College, ] from time 

The Provost of King's College, > to 

The Master or President of Caius College,) time. 
Be it also always understood, and ever kept in view, that the 
owner of this Estate, whoever he or she may be, shall have 
perfect hberty to lodge an Appeal in some of our Law Courts, 
setting forth or complaining that the terms or conditions made 
necessary by the Institutor of this Annuity or Grant, to the ob- 
taining of the whole or parcels of the said Annuity or Grant, are 
not properly observed and fulfilled, and praying that the sum or 
sums, the conditions of which are or have been thus infracted, 
may no longer issue from such Estate : And my express mean- 
ing is — that the truth of such Appeal shall be judicially tried ; 
and that in case of a verdict, judgment, or decree in favour of 
the Appellant, the said Annuity, or such parcels thereof, the con- 
ditions of which are or have been thus infracted or neglected, 
and 80 adjudged, shall thenceforward cease for ever. And that 
my words may be interpreted in the sense in which I employ 
them, I shall be a little more explicit here, and shall divide the 
annuity or grant into four parts: The first comprehends the 
Professor's salary, £105: The second, the Academical honour 
or reward of £12 : The third has only the small sum of 2 Gui- 
neas, for an Annual Sermon: And the last a still smaller, 18^. 
for Books : now my express meaning is 

£105 

12 

2 2 

18 

£120 
6—2 



84 

if the conditions respecting the first be judicially determined to 
have been violated, that such first shall not only henceforward 
for ever cease, but that the salary for the three remainder shall 
cease for ever with it : that is, the whole Annuity become void, 
and be as if it had never taken place : but if the conditions of 
one or all of the three last be only adjudged to have been not 
duly performed, that then the first shall continue in unabridged 
force, and thxit one, or more than one so violated, shall only cease 
and become for ever void. And the better to support this In- 
stitution (for as on the one hand, I would cautiously fence this 
Institution against frauds, so on the other I would not with less 
zeal uphold what it is so much my wish to establish, I would 
not with less wariness secure the Institution against the sordid- 
ness or troublesomeness of an Appellant,) I ordain and appoint 
that no prosecution shall be commenced by the owner of this 
Estate, without a previous notice of four calendar months, and 
without such notice expressing fully the parts of the Institution 
that seem to be violated : And my express meaning is, that if 
two of the three former mentioned Stewards shall within the 
four months return for answer under their hand, that such neg- 
lects or mistakes shall forthwith be rectified, and they be 
accordingly rectified, that then such Appeal shall not be made, 
but all litigation terminate. But for a second offence (if due 
notice of an intentional Appeal has been once given,) no notice 
from the same owner shall be necessary. I should suppose 
it to be obvious, but lest it should not be, I desire to observe — 
that where a penalty is annexed to a transgression or neglect, 
the legal conviction of such transgression or neglect shall not 
cancel the Institution in any part of it, but only create an ob- 
noxiousness to the penalty. 

The first and principal part of the Institution is the Estab- 
lishment of a Professorship of Kevealed Religion, the Professor to 
be styled Revelation Professor ; or, as that phrase seems to me 
to be very objectible, the Norrisian Professor *; who shall be 
subject to each and all of the subsequent conditions and co- 
venants. The Candidate or Candidates shall notice to the 
three former mentioned Stewards, under hand within the first 
14 days of November, the design of supplying this Professor- 

* Either appellation agreeable to me. 



85 

ship ; and the said three Gentlemen or Stewards shall select 
two out of the whole number of Candidates, and shall signify 
their names, on or before the first day of February then next 
ensuing, to the respective Masters, Heads, or Presidents of 
all the respective Colleges and Halls in this University of 
Cambridge : and the day of election, or final appointment of 
one person to the trust, shall be within the first 14 days of 
the succeeding May: and the Election or appointment shall 
be wholly vested in the suffrages personally given, of all the 
aforesaid Masters, Heads or Presidents; and the majority of 
votes shall decide the Election; not less than ten votes shall 
constitute this mode of Election. And upon the supposition that 
there is no agreement as to the selection of two Candidates, 
but warm disputation, such selection shall be referred to a major- 
ity of all the Heads, Masters or Presidents, due regard to be 
ever paid to the virtuous conversation and abilities of each Can- 
didate ; as to the latter, an examination, if required, to be passed 
by each Candidate before the Stewards, or their Deputy, both 
antecedently to the nomination, and to the Election. To bestow 
on the Master of Trinity an additional influence, he shall, if 
he pleases, defer his vote to the last, and if the numbers are even 
without his vote, his vote shall carry the Election, as if he had two 
votes, and could use them both in favour of one person. If 
required by two of the three Stewards, any Candidate shall take 
and subscribe to the Oath hereafter drawn up, on or before the 
twentieth of January : but I make it an indispensable condition, 
and no matter of option, that the Candidate or Candidates shall 
(each) take and subscribe to the oath afore mentioned in the 
presence of at least ten of the Heads, Masters, or Presidents 
in the morning of the Election : the words and all the words of such 
Oath shall be spoken articulately and audibly, then signed and 
then attested by each of the aforesaid ten Heads, Masters or 
Presidents. If such Oath be not thus formally taken, subscribed, 
attested, the Election shall not take place, at least shall be void, 
shall not entitle the person elected to a farthing of the salary. 

The Professor shall give or read, and not out of Term time, 
nor oftener than thrice in one week, fifty Lectures, on fixed 
days, and at fixed hours, so that the omission of a Lecture in one 
part of the day shall not be atoned for by a Lecture in another 



86 

part of the same day, nor the omission of a Lecture on one day 
of the week be atoned for by a Lecture on some other day of 
the same week ; but these omissions shall be atoned for at the 
end of the whole Course of Lectures, the Lectures be then also 
subject to the above regulation of being delivered within Term 
time, and of not exceeding three in a week. I make it essential, 
that to constitute a Lecture there shall be at least six pupils or 
auditors, and that there be not a less time than one full hour 
employed in the discharge of each Lecture; for the omission of 
every Lecture under 50 and above 45, there shall be a deduc- 
tion of one pound from the said salary of £105 ; for the omission 
of every Lecture above 40 and under 46, there shall be a de- 
duction of two pounds ; if the Lectures be under 40 and above 
35, the salary shall be diminished one half (t. e. it shall be only 
£52 10^. instead of £105) in every year which has this defi- 
ciency : if the Lectures amount not to 35, all salary for that 
year shall cease. The actual illness or real indisposition of 
the Professor, if it be certified under his hand, or the hand of 
some of the Medical Faculty attending him, unto two of the three 
Stewards, shall excuse or annul the deduction of one pound as 
above named and explained, and the deduction of two pounds as 
above named and explained, provided always that the Professor 
appoints a Deputy, and such Deputy be approved by two of the 
three Stewards, the Master of Trinity to be one of the two so 
consulted : and the appointment of such Deputy shall do, more 
than make up for the omitted Lectures : under 50 and above 
40, it shall atone for the omission of all above 35 ; so that the 
salary shall not be diminished unto £52 10«. as before named 
and explained ; thus the Deputy may read 15 Lectures, pro- 
vided always that sickness is the Professor's true reason for 
appointing such Deputy : the Deputy to be subject to the same 
restrictions as the Professor, with regard to the time of reading 
his Lectures, and everything else relating to them. If the Pro- 
fessor voluntarily relinquishes his office in any part of the first 
year after election or re-election, he shall forfeit (although he 
may have gone through the whole Course of Lectures) the whole 
year's salary; if in the second year, his salary shall from £105 
be reduced to eighty-four pounds; if in the third year, his salary 
shall be reduced from £105 unto ninety-four pounds and ten 



87 

shillings ; eqaally subject too in both these cases to all the terms 
and covenants relating to this Trust or Institution. The Professor 
may have been educated at either of our English Universities ; 
may be Lay or Clerical, but he shall not be elected into the 
office under his 30th year, nor re-elected after his 60th. He 
shall be obnoxious to dispossession at any time by a majority 
of the Heads, Masters, or Presidents of the respective Colleges 
and Halls in this University of Cambridge : but then the objec- 
tions or objection to him shall be testified under the hand of each 
of such majority. The Master of Trinity shall have the same 
privilege here, as given him at the Election. Of the pupils or 
auditors attending these Lectures, or any of them, no gratuity 
whatever shall be accepted by the Professor, or to his advantage 
in any respect. The receiving of any money, gratuity, or com- 
pliment, shall, if proved upon oath before the Trustees, or two of 
the three Stewards, within four calendar months after the trespass, 
invalidate entirely the Professor's claim for that year for a 
whole year to any salary whatever, (unless in instances of 
ampler fortune than usual, and these instances or exceptions have 
been submitted to all the three Stewards, and have received the 
sanction of all three). The persons first admitted, received and' 
numbered as pupils, shall be those intended for orders : I say 
only first admitted, for I would not wish any exclusion. A 
second proof of corruption in office shall not only cancel, as the 
first, all claim to one year's salary, but shall vacate the Professor- 
ship, a new Election shall ensue, and the late Professor be ever 
afterwards ineligible. No pupil or auditor shall be admitted 
into the Lecture Room unless he be provided with the Old and 
New Testament, and with Pearson on the Creed; if any one, not 
thus provided be admitted, the Professor shall forfeit to the 
owner of the heretofore mentioned estate, out of his salary, 21 
shillings for every such person so received. I make it essential 
to this Institution, that the Professor reads, or causes to be read 
during the Course of Lectures, the following articles in the said 
Exposition of the Creed : viz. The whole article relating to our 
Blessed Saviour, beginning with — "And in Jesus Christ his only 
Son, our Lord," — ^and ending with — " The Quick and the Dead f ' 
the article relating to the Holy Ghost, — " I believe in the 
Holy Ghost," and the article — " The Resurrection of the Body, 



88 

and the Life everlasting.'^ At other times, it is my. express 
meaning that the Professor shall make the Bible, particalarlj 
the Prophecies and the Evangelical History, the chief source 
and subject of his Lectures ; and that he points out and enlarges 
upon the various beauties of the Sacred composition, (for infinite 
beauties there are,) paralleling them with admired passages in 
profane authors : that he shews the necessity of Revelation, and 
yet at the same time that it enjoins no practice, lays no re- 
straint that is not entirely consonant with right reason. No 
Professor shall be allowed to continue in his office, without a 
fresh Election, for more than five successive years. The Oath 
hereinafter inserted shall be as necessary to the validity of a 
re-election as of the first Election. The Stewards are to have 
power to reject any Lecture Room which they shall judge in- 
commodious. The time which I appoint for the payment of the 
aalary is the 24th day of every June (supposing the conditions 
necessary to claim it are fulfilled), that June excepted which 
shall succeed the May in which the first Election under this 
Institution shall take place. Before the owner of this Estate shall 
be compellable to pay the Annuity, a state of the account, that is, 
how many omissions there have been in the number of Lectures, 
whether there has been a Deputy, in short, how far the conditions 
have been discharged, such a state of facts shall be delivered, if 
required, to the Trustees of this Annuity or the owner of the 
Estate, his or her Agent, under the hand of the Professor — in 
these words:-^" I assert that the above account of my proceed- 
ings in my Professorship is most truly and fairly stated :" but 
whether demanded or not, the Professor shall, before the 20th of 
May in every year, send such a state of his proceedings, so 
worded and subscribed, to each of the three Stewards ; to one of 
whom, and not to the Professor himself, shall the Annuity be 
paid : and the receipt taken shall run in the names of all the 
three Stewards, shall be subscribed by all three (when it happens 
otherwise — from some necessity — the reason of the omission of 
such name shall be assigned), and shall close with these words — 7 
'' For the use of the Professor under this grant : of all the con- 
ditions of which we are to the best of our ability faithful 
Guardians." 



89 



The Oath. 

As I profess to believe that the Godhead or the Divine and 
one only independent Essence, comprehendeth three persons, the 
Father, and the Son, or " the Word, who was made Flesh, and 
dwelled among us,'* and the Holy Ghost, or Holy Spirit' — so I 
swear that I will not knowingly and designedly, if I shall be 
elected into that trust to which this Oath is made preparatory, 
either inculcate or countenance in my discharge of the said Trust 
any doctrines contrary to my present sense of the profession 
which I have now thus publicly made of my Religious Belief. 

Amen. So help me God. 

Or this Oath. 

As I profess to believe in one God the Father Almighty, and 
in one Lord Jesus Christ, the only-begotten Son of God, God of 
God, Light of Light, very God of very God, and in the Holy 
Ghost, the Lord and Giver of Life, proceeding from the Father 
and the Son, and together with them worshipped and glorified, 
so I swear that I will not knowingly and designedly, if I shall 
be elected into that trust to which this Oath is made preparatory, 
either inculcate or countenance, in my discharge of the said 
trust, any doctrines contrary to the Profession which I have now 
thus publicly made of my belief in the ** Holy, Blessed, and Glo- 
rious Trinity, three persons and one God." 

Amen. So help me God. 

The second part or parcel of the Annuity relates to a premium 
for the encouragement of application in the Students of this Uni- 
versity of Cambridge : I allot Twelve Pounds out of the Annuity 
of £120, as a reward for the best Prose English Essay, on 
some such subjects as the following, — The great advantages of 
Revelation — (shewing amongst other proofs, the insufficiency of 
human reason, by the preposterous opinions of those nations '^ who 
have not yet learned Christ") — The goodness of our Father to 
give his only-begotten Son for us — The necessity of a Redeemer, 
with the sufficiency of his merits, and the insufficiency of our own — 
His perfect example and amiable character — the astonishing 



r 



90 

and most gracious reward of Eternity — no reason to expect such 
a reward, if we continue in the practice of any one known sin, 
however scrupulously exact we have been in performing all our 
duties, any single one only excepted — the necessity of the 
co-operation of the Holy Spirit with our endeavours after 
righteousness, the pleasing contemplation of a continual Com- 
forter — the literary beauties of the Scriptures, &c. &c. 

Two Three pound twelves, or £7 4^. of the aforesaid sum 
of Twelve pounds, shall be expended upon a gold medal, one 
side of which shall represent the New Testament, and the Cross 
with this Inscription around it, ** The wisdom of God unto 
salvation'^ — the reverse shall represent — in as few figures as 
possible, in order that they may be more distinct — the Resur- 
rection, with this Inscription around it, ^' Death is swallowed up 
in victory " — upon the edge (where the milling in our current 
coin is impressed) shall be these words — " the Norrisian Prize*,'* 
and if there be room, the name of the successful candidate, 
and the date of the year. I would have the medal exe- 
cuted in a very masterly manner. And I leave the adju- 
dication of superior merit in the Essays to the opinion of the 
three Stewards ; and if they are not agreed, to a majority, 
when the Professor under this Institution, and the Hebrew 
and Greek Professors, have been first called in. The residue 
of the Twelve pounds, viz. Four pounds and sixteen shillings, is 
to be disposed of in books; amongst which I make it essen- 
tial that there be the following : a Bible, or the Old and New 
Testament — Sherlock's (Bishop of London) Discourses, vols. 4 — 
Leland's View of Deistical Writers, last edition — Pearson on 
the Creed: — (but if the Bible and Pearson be already had, 
there is no occasion for duplicates). The surplus after this pur- 
chase shall be expended in such books as the Professor shall 
choose : upon the inside of the left-hand cover (as the book is 
opened) of each book shall be pasted a copper-plate impression 
of one of the sides of the medal. The qualifications of the Can- 
didates, for the first three years after the commencement of this 
Institution, shall be only these : — Their age not to exceed 30, 
nor to be under 20 — to be, or to have been students of this 

* Or, " The Revelation Prize," accordingly as the Professor's appel- 
lation shall be settled. 



i 



91 

University : after the first 3 years, there shall ever hencefor- 
ward be essential this additional qualification, namely, attendance 
at these Lectures for 20 times in the course of one year ; and 
moreover, this attendance is to be signified to the Stewards 
under the Professor's hand. 

The Professor shall propound each year's Thesis, and he 
shall cause it to be published in one of the most public London 
papers, and such publication shall be always within the first ten 
days of every November : the Essays to be sealed up as custom- 
arily in other probationary exercises, and sent to one of the 
three Stewards, on or before the tenth day preceding the Sunday 
in every Passion- week, and on the Thursday morning preceding 
every Good Friday shall the successful Candidate know the Ad- 
judication, and shall within fourteen days receive the medal and 
the books. Provided always, that at the time of receiving them 
he gives a promissory note for the payment of Twelve pounds 
to the Trustees, or owner of the Estate whence arises the An- 
nuity, in case he does not cause such Essay so rewarded to 
be publicly printed and published within two calendar months. 
Any opinion advanced in such Essay, contrary to the National 
Church's Articles, with respect to our Saviour's Divinity, and 
the personality of the Holy Spirit, shall as utterly disqualify a 
Candidate from receiving the reward, as the absurdity and weak- 
ness of the composition itself; and whether such Essay does 
advance such opinion or opinions, is hereby left to the decision 
of them who are constituted Judges of the merit of the Essays. 
The payment of the aforesaid portion of Twelve pounds out of 
the Hundred and twenty pounds, is to be made at the same time 
with the payment to the Professor, and unto the same receivers, 
who are to give a distinct receipt for the same. The medal and 
books are annually to be ordered by the Stewards, and whatever 
expence may arise from the publication of the Thesis in the 
London paper, and from the copper-plate impressions, is to be 
defrayed out of the £4: l%s, allowed for books. 

The third division compriseth only the small sum of two 
guineas, for an Annual Sermon in the University Church, (the 
subject to have always some reference to Revelation,) to be 
preached upon every Good Friday, unless it be a constant custom 



92 

already to have a sermon in the morning of that day ; (for 
I would have this sermon preached in a morning ;) and if such 
be the present custom, then this sermon shall be preached in the 
morning of one of these days, (whether it happen to be Sunday 
or not,) viz. the 14th of November, or the 1st of December, or 
the 10th of the same month, in every year : and a notice of 
seven days previously to the preaching of it shall be given in 
the Cambridge Newspaper, or that paper which circulates most 
generally in the University and Town : if the Professor under 
this Institution be in orders, he has his choice to preach it, and 
if not in orders, or chooses not to preach it, he shall have the 
appointment of the person. But be it always understood — That 
if the sermon be not publicly published in print, within four weeks 
from the day of preaching it, the money, vi%. the two guineas, 
shall not be received of the Trustees or Owner of this Estate ; 
it shall for every such year so omitted not become due. The 
advertisement in the paper of such sermon to be so preached 
shall be paid by the Professor, who (if the sermon be published) 
may deduct it from the two guineas. The Stewards who give 
the other before-mentioned receipts are also to give a receipt 
for this money, observing in such receipt " that the sermon has 
been printed and published," and when the other suras (if due) 
are to be paid into the hands of the already named Stewards, 
this sum (if due) is likewise to be paid. 

The fourth and last particular includes only the sum of 
eighteen shillings (for add £106, and «f^l2, and £2 and 28. there 
will only want 18*. to complete the annuity of One hundred and 

£106 0*. 
12 
2 2 
18 



0^120 



twenty pounds) ; and this sum of eighteen shillings is by my 
express order to be laid out in books — The New Testament, 
and (a shilling book) the Great Importance of a Religious 
Life : which books are annually to be sent by the Professor 
unto one of the Proctors of the University, who is to distribute 



r 



93 

them amongst such delinquents (who can read) as shall happen 
from time to time to be confined or imprisoned in some gaol, 
spinning or workhouse, or cage, belonging to the said University 
of Cambridge. Before this sum of 1 85. shall become due from 
the Trustees, or Owner of the Estate, whence the Annuity 
arises, an account under the Proctor's hand, ** That such books 
(to the amount aforesaid) have been distributed,^' shall be trans* 
mitted to one of the Stewards already named, who shall produce 
the same when the receipts for the other sums are delivered ; 
at which time this sum (if due) shall be likewise paid. 

If this Institution do not take place, from any non-conformity 
in the University, within twenty-four months from the day of 
my decease, it shall not afterwards : but the whole Annuity of 
^120 shall lapse, and be ever afterwards irrecoverable. 

All written with my own hand and bearing date, Bristol, 
September 22nd, 1768. 

(Containing twenty pages.) JOHN NORRIS. 

This is the Paper or Book to which my Will {bearing 
date, June 26th : 70) refers. 

Oh my sister I (or whoever shall succeed me) should there 
be any legal defect in this Institution, avail not yourself of it, but 
fulfil my meaning : depend upon it, you will never be happy 
(for who bestows happiness ?) if you do not act in this instance 
agreeably to my intention. 

This is the Paper, or Book, to which my Will {bearing 
date, June 26th, 70) refers. 

I remember that at the end of the extract from Porteus's ser- 
mon, (which extract I have cited) the Reviewers, those pious 
Annotators, make some such reflection as this : — "We hope that if 
ever such an Institution does take place, it will be grounded upon 
a freedom of enquiry." What the end of this freedom of enquiry 
is, the Infidelity of the age loudly and clearly explains, A free- 
dom of enquiry is indeed recommended to us, but it is an unpre- 
judiced freedom of enquiry ; and in what heart — in this aera of 
intellectual pride — shall we find no previous bias ? The folly 
and arrogance is, that the modern free-thinker imagines there 






94 

can have been no freedom of enquiry where the result of it 
corresponds not with its own creed : as if the man whose enquiry 
led him to the same opinions with those of Burnett of the 
Charter-house, Pearson, Addison, Nelson, Sherlock, must be 
more narrow minded, more fettered than he who coincides with 
Clarke, Clogher, and the liberal translator of the New Testament, 
&c. &c. But why should I seem to wish to apologize for re- 
strictions which I judge proper to be put upon an Institution 
that is wholly my own ? There can be but one system of Divin- 
ity, according to the truth ; and this true system is I think 
contained in one of the petitions of the Church of England — " 
holy, blessed and glorious Trinity, three persons and one God," 
&c. ; wherefore I very naturally established this Institution 
upon what I esteem to be the language of Scripture. It is 
easily discoverable, even by Harwood's liberal Translation of the 
New Testament (so liberal as to preserve no Original Text) 
what falsehoods a Libertine Lecturer might introduce, what a 
wrong bias upon young minds he might permanently impress. 
Certain it is, that every seriously thinking man would, upon estab- 
lishing such an Institution as this, require of its Professor the 
sanction of an oath not to inculcate principles contrary to those 
entertained by the Institutor. Not that I desire, nay, it is of 
all things opposite to my desire, that controversial topics should 
be debated in these Lectures : The necessity of a Revelation, — 
The noble precepts of morality, which it has conveyed to us, — 
The beauties of the Sacred Writings, — these are the things which 
I wish to be illustrated ; only as there must unavoidably be 
explanations of difficult passages, and seeming contrarieties, and 
as there will too be sometimes curious questions asked, I would 
warily guard against notions derogatory from Him who made us, 
and from Him also, who if this Institution be a righteous one, 
has influenced me to establish it — notions derogatory from the 
Son, and the Holy Ghost, both of whom live and reign (in what 
manner His most true we know not,) with the Father, as one 
Lord God, to an eternity of ages. 

Hallelujah ! 

One word more — I apprehend that none of our Universities, 
however so disposed, could permit the establishment of an 



95. 

Institution (of this nature) contrary to the Articles of the Pro- 
testant National Church. What objection then can Cambridge 
in propriety have to my prescribed Oath ? The reason why I 
particularized the oath is obvious — That he who should take it 
might know its compass : for a general oath, such as would have 
enforced an unspecified conformity to the Articles of our Church, 
would have been, I think, abundantly too comprehensive. Infal- 
libility belongs to no earthly communion ; there are some of the 
39 Articles (as much as I at this juncture recollect of them,) 
which, if true, would abate my love towards Him who I am 
now convinced is the only proper object of it. 

If this Institution takes place, I would wish that the three 
Stewards should be presented with Ten guineas each, and that 
the same sum should be given to each of the Trustees, over and 
above what may be left to them by my will. 

J. K 



3. Ewtrdct frmn Will and Codicil of the Rev. Dr, Benedict 
Chapman^ dated respectively Oct. 8, 1846, and August 16, 
1852. 

Will. 

I leave and bequeath unto the Chancellor, Masters and 
Scholars of that University five hundred pounds 3 per Cent. 
Reduced Bank Annuities, the dividends of which I direct shall 
be paid unto the University Chest till the legacy duty shall have 
been repaid to the Chest, my object of which is that the foun- 
dation for which I give it may eventually have the full interest 
of my benefaction ; and after the Chest has been thus satisfied 
my Will is that the dividends as they become due should be 
paid to the Norrisian Professor of Divinity for the time being 
as an augmentation of his stipend under the same conditions as 
are prescribed in the original foundation. 

Codicil. 

And whereas I have by my said Will left and bequeathed 
five hundred pounds 3 per Cent. Reduced Bank Annuities to the 



'■ 



96 

Chancellor, Masters and Scholars of the University of Cambridge 
for the augmentation of the salary of the Norrisian Professor of 
Divinity in that University ; now I hereby leave and bequeath 
unto them another five hundred pounds 3 per Cent. Beduced Bank 
Annuities in addition to my former bequest, and I hereby direct, 
as in the former case, that the legacy duty thereon may be 
repaid to the University Chest in the same manner as mentioned 
in my said WiU, and that the Professor receive none of the 
dividends till the University Chest has been repaid what it had 
advanced, so that the Professor may eventually receive the full 
benefit of the interest of the whole legacy of one thousand 
pounds 3 per Cent. Reduced. 

4. Lord Wodeh(yuse*8 Benefaction. 

The following Grace was passed by the Senate, April 13, 
1863:— 

The Norrisian Professor's salary for the year 1850 — 61, 
amounting to £102 13«. 6d., having reverted to Lord Wode- 
house, the owner of the late Mr Norris' estate, in consequence 
of no lectures having been delivered during that year while the 
Professor held the ofiice of Vice-Chancellor ; and Lord Wode- 
house having offered the above sum to the University, to be 
added to the fund lately bequeathed by Dr Chapman for the 
augmentation of the Norrisian Professor's salary ; ' 

To accept the same and to authorize the Vice- Chancellor to 
communicate to his Lordship the thanks oi the Senate. 



97 



XL Jacksonian Professorship of Natural Philosophy. 

'^ In the Name of God This is the last Will and Testament 
of me Richard Jackson, of Tarrington in Hertfordshire, &c. 

'^ Item^ I hereby give, devise, and bequeath all that mj 
Freehold Estate at Upper Longsdon, in the parish of Leek, and 
County of Stafford, now in the Tenure of John Knight, with all 
rights, members, and appurtenances whatever thereto belonging, 
to the Master Fellows and Scholars of Trinity College, within 
the Town and University of Cambridge, of King Henry the 
Eighth's foundation, their heirs and successors for ever in and for 
the Trusts herein mentioned, that is to say, that the Master and 
Bursars of the said College, or one of them shall immediately after 
my decease procure an accurate survey and map, to be made 
of the lands of the said estate at Upper Longsdon, with the 
Buttings and Boundings of the same duly and truly laid down 
in the map, and set forth in a Terrier annexed to the Survey, 
to be laid up and preserved in the Archives of the said 
College. And that when the present Lease, which was made 
by me on the 5th of April, 1765, to the late John Knight, 
his Executors, Administrators, and Assigns, for twenty-one years 
shall expire, that then the Master and sixteen of the Senior Fel- 
lows of Trinity College aforesaid, or the majority of them shall, 
under their 'Common Seal, set the said Lands to some fair Tenant 
upon such conditions, and for such rent and term of years, not 
exceeding twenty -one years, renewable at the end of each seven 
years, as shall seem best to them for keeping the buildings in 
repair and the land in good condition, so as shall be most con- 
ducive to the purpose herein mentioned; and with regard to the 
letting the estate at Longsdon aforesaid to farm, my Will is that 
the same shall be in the power of the Master, Fellows, and 
Scholars aforesaid, in the same manner and to the same intents 
and purposes as the estates vested in them by the foundation 
Charter of Henry the Eighth are by them set and to farm let. 
Provided that no lease by them made to any tenant shall be for 
a longer term or duration than for the term of seven years to be 
computed from the day of the sealing, with the U9ual seal of the 
College, each respective Lease: for which sealing and their 

7 



98 

attendance thereon, my Will is, that each of the sixteen Fellows 
who attends such sealing shall receive from the Bursar of the 
said College the sum of five shillings in money, or the value of 
one bushel of wheat, according to the rate that the best wheat 
shall make in the Market of Cambridge, on the Market Day 
previous to the sealing the said Lease, and the Master of the 
College to have ten shillings in money, or the value of two 
bushels of like wheat and no more, the said money for sealing 
the said Lease to be deducted out of the rents of the sidd Estate, 
which grew due the year previous to each respective renewal ; 
and provided secondly, that one-third part of the rent to be 
paid for the said Estate to be reserved in Com for the Lecturer 
and Gardener herein afterwards named, to wit, in good wheat 
after the rate of forty-eight shillings the quarter, and good malt 
after the rate of forty shillings the quarter, to be delivered at 
the said College yearly, upon the rent-days prefixed, or in de- 
fault thereof to pay to the said College, in ready money, at the 
election of the said Lessors, the Master and Fellows aforesaid, 
after the rate of the best wheat or malt that shall be sold in the 
Market of Cambridge on the next Market Day before the rent 
shall be due, without fraud or deceit All Leases otherwise made 
shall be void in law to all intents and purposes. Also I Will that 
the Master and sixteen of the Senior Fellows of Trinity College 
aforesaid, do by mortgage or otherwbe raise, as soon as possible, 
the sum of five hundred pounds on the said Estate, and pay the 
same as follows, to wit, the sum of one hundred pounds unto 
Kuth, the wife of Birch of Barton under Needwood, Surgeon, 
and unto Ann, the wife of Thomas Dawes, of Coleshill in War- 
wickshire, the like sum of one hundred pound to be retained ijx 
the hands of the Bursar or Master of the said College, or to be 
put out to interest during the life of the said Thomas Dawes, for 
her sole use, and the principal to be paid to her on the decease 
of the said Thomas Dawes, or in case he survives her to her 
eldest son; and the further sum of two hundred pounds to 
Elizabeth Shipton of Highwall Hill, in the parish of Yoxall in 
Staffordshire, and the remaining hundred pounds for the survey 
and mapping of the said Estate^ and providing an Apparatus for 
the use of the Lecturer : And my Will is that the said Master, 
Fellows and Scholars of Trinity College aforesaid, after setting 
so much of the rents of the said Estate apart as will yearly pay 



99 

the interest of the said five hundred pounds, and also a further 
part of the said rents (not exceeding twenty pounds a-year) 
apart to be applied towards discharging part of the said principal, 
and so on yearly, till the whole is paid off, shall divide the re^ 
mainder (the necessary expense of collecting the same being first 
deducted) into five equal parts, and pay one-fifth part of the 
same to the Head or chief Gardener of the University Physic 
Garden there for the time being, and shall pay the remainder, 
without deduction, except the necessary charge of collecting, to 
a Lecturer, Professor, or Demonstrator of Natural Philosophy 
in the said University, on his bringing a certificate, signed by 
eight Scholars at least, who have attended his Lectures for 
twenty days out of sixty, that he has duly gone through a course 
of Demonstrations, Exhibitions and Lectures, according to the 
articles set forth in a Schedule hereto annexed. And my Will is 
that such Reader or Professor be chose by the Regent Masters 
of Arts only of the University, who have been resident there for 
the greater part of the year previous to the day of election, (ex- 
cepting only such Masters of Arts as are under one year's stand- 
ing, who may vote though they have not been resident for that 
•term):; which said Regent Masters, on notice given to them by the 
«aid Master FeUows and Scholars aforesaid {or any of them) of 
this my devise, shall assemble publicly on some day to be fixed 
by the Master of Trinity or the Vice-Master, in some of the 
public buildings belonging to the said University, or in the 
Hall or Chapel of Trinity College aforesaid, or the open Court 
there, and within one month after such notice given to them, by 
the said Master Fellows aad Scholars or any of them, by fixing 
up a writing on the School-dows, of St Mary Church, the door of 
the Regent House, or any of them, and shall by Poll, to be taken 
by the Proctors for the time being, or if they or either of them 
be absent, then by the two Junior Masters Regent then present 
(neither of whom is Candidate for the office of Lecturer) choose 
by majority of votes, given in writing, under the hand of each^ 
to the Proctors or Junior Regents aforesaid, such person as they 
shall in their own proper judgments look upon to be best quali' 
fied by his knowledge in Natural Experimental Philosophy and 
the practical part thereof, and of Chymistry, to instruct the 
Students in the said University in the said Sciences, such Lec- 
turer to be a Member of Trinity College (either Fellow or not), 

7—2 



W \ 



100 

if such be found equally qualified with any other Candidate, and 
preference to be given caeteria paribus to a Staffordshire or 
Warwickshire, or Derbyshire or Cheshire Man; which Lecturer 
being so chosen by a majority of the said Regent Masters as 
aforesaid, (and in case dispute arise about the majority, then the 
same to be determined by the Vice-Chancellor of the University, 
the Provost of King's College, and the Master of Trinity College 
there, or if either of the two last be Vice-Chancellor, then by 
the Master of St John's College, so as to make up three, or by the 
majority of such three) shall within twelve calendar months after 
the day of his election, read publicly a course of Lectures on 
Anatomy, Animal Economy, Chymistry, Botany, Agriculture, or 
the Materia Medica at large, with due and proper exhibitions of 
the subject to be read upon, or whose properties are to be ex- 
plained or enquired into, together with proper Dissections, Ana- 
lyses and Experiments upon the subjects of the same, according 
to their respective natures, as may compose a due series of expe- 
rimental lectures and such practice as may truly thence result 
for eonfirmation of what is known at present, or for making 
furtiier discoveries in any branch thereof as may best tend to set 
forth the Glory of Almighty God, and promote the welfare of 
mankind, by making further progress in the practice of physio 
or of agriculture, and the investigation of the relative properties 
of various earths, sands, clays, marls and the like to each other, 
so as they best may answer the growth of useful vegetables 
therein, and also in a more precise investigation of the properties 
of what is or may hereafter be part of the Materia Medica, so 
as to form a more certain practice than at present exists of the 
art of curing diseases or preventing or making life more easy 
under them ; and here it is my serious request that the said 
Lecturer will in this Disquisition have an eye more particularly 
to that opprobrium medicorum called the gout, both in getting a 
better history of the disorder itself, and the symptoms preceding, 
attending and following it, than is extant at present : Also of 
the best method of procrastinating the fits from coming by the 
use of diet and the other non-naturals: And in finding a 
medicine that may cure it (of which I have no doubt from the 
goodness of God that a discovery may be made) ; and my further 
request to the Lecturer or Professor is, that herein he will 
adhere to plain facts, both in the history and narrative of expe- 



101 

riments without adding any hypothesis (unless after the manner 
that is done by Sir Isaac Newton at the end of his Optics) : But 
of this it is my intention, God willing, to draw up a more regu- 
lar scheme or Series Lectionum, directing what is to be shewn, 
and what is to be tried or done in a separate paper, to be kept 
annexed hereto. And my Will is that the Lectures be read on 
thirty-six several days, and not less than one hour at each lec- 
ture, on some of the days between the beginning of Michaelmas 
Term and the Commencement, yearly ; and that the said Lecturer 
or Professor do admit to the same, without fee or reward, twelve 
persons, four of whom to be of Trinity College, if they choose to 
attend, and the other eight out of the University at large, yet 
so that none of these shall have access to more than two of these 
courses of Lectures gratis, and that each of these shall attend at 
least thirty of the Lectures, and in case of neglect, others to be 
taken into their places, either in that course or in the next 
ensuing course. And my Will is, that at the end of the said 
course, the Bursar of Trinity College on such Lecturer produdng 
a certificate as aforesaid, under the hands of eight Scholars as 
aforesaid, shall pay to him or his legal order the whole product 
of the Estate at Upper Longsdon aforesaid, clear as it came in 
the preceding year, excepting a fifth part of that sum yearly, 
which the said Bursar is hereby desired and directed to pay to 
the Chief or Head Gardener of the Physic Garden in the said 
University, who in consideration thereof is required to furnish 
the said Lecturer or Professor with two or three (at least) spe- 
cimens (either green if it may be or dry) of such plants or parts 
of plants as he may want to shew or examine in his Lectures, 
and which are of the growth of this Eingd(Mn, he the said Pro- 
fessor giving the said Gardener a list of what plants he shall 
want a fortnight at least before the time they will be wanted : 
But in case the said Lecturer or Professor shall neglect or omit 
the said sixty days' Lectures for the term of one whole year, 
then the Master Fellows and Scholars of Trinity College afore- 
said, or some of them, or the Bursar on default of a certificate 
being brought to him that such Lecture had been duly read as 
aforesaid, shall give public notice by the ways and means afore- 
said of such omission ; for which the said Bursar shall and may 
out of the said rent receive five pounds for his trouble ; and then 
the said Regent Masters as aforesaid are requested within one 



102 

calendar month after such notice, on a day to be fixed by the 
Master of Trinity College for that purpose, or in his absence, by 
the Vice-Master, to elect some other person qualified as aforesaid 
to be Lecturer or Professor in the same manner as if the former 
Lecturer was naturally dead : And in case the said Regents neg- 
lect or omit to choose a new Professor or Lecturer within the 
time aforesaid, then the Vice-Chancellor for the time being, the 
Provost of King's College and the Master of Trinity College, or 
the majority of them (taking in the Master of St John's College if 
either of the two last happen to be Vice-Chancellor) shall appoint a 
Lecturer to and for the purpose aforesaid, and according to the 
forementioned qualifications, provided always that no person, who 
by his neglect or omission of the said sixty Lectures has vacated 
his place, shall ever be chosen again or reinstated in the same. 
And my Will is, that such rents as may arise or grow due 
during the time that a vacancy shall happen in the said Pro- 
fessorship by the death of the said Reader, or his neglecting his 
duty, shall be paid in equal shares to two of the Students 
(whether Scholars of the House or not) of Trinity College, who 
took the degree of Bachelor of Arts with most reputation pre- 
vious to the day on which the said rents may grow due : And 
in case any doubt or dispute shall arise about the due reading 
of the said Lecture, or the proper subject of it, or the payment 
of the salary of the Lecturer or Gardener of the Physic Garden 
respectively or any other point or case relating to the premises 
herein contained, then my Will is that the same be determined 
by the Provost of King's College, the Master of Trinity College, 
and the Master of Saint John's College in Cambridge, or the 
majority for the time being of them, and in case they shall be 
divided in their opinions, then by the Vice-Chancellor for the time 
being (unless he happens to be head of one of the three Colleges, 
and then by the Bishop of Ely for the time being), whose deter- 
mination shall be final. But if any person shall think himself 
aggrieved by such determination, and carry his plea to any other 
Court of Common or Civil or Ecclesiastical Law or Equity, then 
my Will is that by such process or appeal he or they shall be 
immediately and fully barred and deprived of all profit and be- 
nefit arising from the hereby demised premises as fully as if this 
Bequest had never been made." 



103 



Exiraet from a second Codicil to the cibove recited Will of the 
Bev, Richard Jackson^ dated July 5, 1781. 

" In case the Course of Lectures at Cambridge are omitted 
to be read, or the Lecturer, in case of a vacancy, chosen for one 
calendar year, I then devise the whole year's rents of the 
Longsdon Estate to be paid by the Vicar and Overseers of the 
Poor of Leek, to be applied in apprenticing children thereof. 

To the Master^ Fellows and Scholars of Trinity College in 

Cambridge^ Richard Jackson presents 

** A sketch of the form of Lectures in Practical Philosophy 
which I would have followed by my Professor or Lecturer in the 
University of Cambridge : — 

" As my design in founding this Lecture is the promotion of 
real and useful knowledge, my opinion is, that this cannot be 
done to any good purpose by mere reading a Discourse or Dis- 
quisition, or Essay, but shewing and doing something in the way 
of experiment upon the subject undertaken to be treated, and 
my intention in this being to lead young persons by the most 
easy, natural, and as much as may be geometrical method of 
conducting these inquiries into the properties and us^ of natural 
bodies, whether mineral, vegetable, or animal, and their relative 
effects upon each other, I therefore recommend the method which 
Boerhaave has followed in his practice of chymistry to be pur- 
sued in these Lectures. That is, the natural body which is the 
subject to be inquired about is to be exhibited in its genuine 
simple state, the obvious and distinguishing marks of it shewn, 
BO as to specify wherein it agrees, and wherein it essentially 
differs from other bodies that are like it ; what effects various 
degrees of heat or cold have upon it, either in disclosing the 
qualities which it possesses unchanged, or how and into what 
different or contrary qualities it does change them. The same 
method I recommend to be pursued in the application of water, 
spirits, oils, or those things which are called Menstruums in 
general, to any natural body which is the object of inquiry, 
always beginning with the simplest and most easy operations 
first, and remarking accurately, and recording honestly, all the 
appearances which arise in the course of the experiment Not 



104 

that my design is in setting down these rules, (which I write in 
the order in which they occur) to tie the Lecturer down to 
Boerhaave^s plan,, or the plan of any other man, but to recom- 
mend it as the most easy and methodical scheme that I know of 
investigating and of exhibiting to beginners the real properties 
with which natural bodies are endowed, unaltered and unchanged 
as much as may be,- by the effects of fire or the like, and what 
effects they hare upon each other when applied together in the 
simplest manner. 

" The field before us is immense, and unless circumscribed 
ty some bounds, and limited by some rules, more likely to puzzle 
or overwhelm the poor faculties of our minds than to inform and 
enlarge that information which experiments may bestow, so that 
among the many objects of inquiry, as my intention is to direct 
this Lecture to the point which may be of most use to mankind, 
I recommend an inquiry into those things which we cannot be 
without, and upon which not only our well-being but our very 
existence in this world depends. I mean in the first place, the 
properties of air and water, heat and cold, and what has a con- 
siderable share in the effect of aU these, the powers of electricity. 

« This may seem very trifling, as these are common things, 
which we all of us think we are well acquainted with. But to 
shew how little we know in reality I will only give one instance 
of the discoveries that have been made within the compass of 
my own memory with respect to air, that from thence a juds:- 
Jnt may be formed how much it is stiU behind, or in plak 
English, how great our ignorance of its properties is. I owe 
the recovery of health from diseases,, which no medicines could 
reach, to Buxton Water. In the year 1760, after being ill of 
the gout, by drinking some beer which proved to be a little stale, 
it seized my stomach, and though Dr Ash was employed, ,and 
used all the means which the present practice of physic suggested, 
it continued for near ten weeks, with intermission, by fits indeed, 
but in the main very bad, till I was at death^s door, so that at last he 
ingenuously said, ' Bath, Buxton, or the grave.' I chose Buxton, 
and went directly, and by drinking a small quantity at the spring 
head, in three days' time my pains went gradually quite away, 
and appetite, with a good digestion, returned. I had been often 
at Buxton before, and knew that the water contained neither 
salts, sulphur, nor steel, nor any other mineral with which other 



106 

medicinftl waters are usaally impr^nated ; at least none of these 
had yet been discovered, nor do they I believe exist in it To 
what then could the very great effect which I experienced from 
these waters be owing ? I guessed, though it was only surmise, 
but such a surmise brought conviction with it, that their force 
lay in those little bubbles which are incessantly rising in those 
waters at their springing out of the earth. This surmise struck 
me more forcibly on seeing by chance the image of the sun 
reflected from the water of Bingham Well, at its rise between 
the two open rocks where it springs. The stream is small and 
shallow, but the whole of it appeared as if full of electrical 
sparks. 

" The properties of newly generated air were not then known 
nor its anti-septic qualities suspected. I refer to the dates of 
Mr Brides' Experiments and those of Dr Brownrig, Mr Caven- 
dish and others, to shew how late these discoveries are ; and it 
is but yesterday since we knew that what is fatal if taken into 
the lungs, is a most efficacious medicine through the stomach; 
that one kind of newly generated air extinguishes flame, and that 
a different one kindles at it, with many other properties which I 
do not mention, and only mention these to suggest my strong 
suspicion that we are ignorant of more qualities (and those of 
vast activity) which belong to it than we at present are acquainted 
with, and as such I recommend it as a subject well worthy of 
further examination by experiment. 

Hints relating to the Physiological Lectures upon Plants, 

*' When any particular plant is made the subject of disquisition, 
the first thing to be done must be to ascertain the particular 
species which your thoughts and experiments are then employed 
about, and this by enumerating the most obvious and most dis- 
tinguishing outward marks and charaeters, by which its genus 
tribe and species may be known and made apparent to a com- 
mon understanding, and if there be two or more plants of the 
same family whose appearance is so much alike that there is 
danger in mistaking one for the other, then by an actual exhibi- 
tion of both to obviate this difficulty, and shew the distinguishing 
mark by the which one may be certainly known from the other. In 
order to set forth this in the clearest light, it may be necessary 
to give an historical account of the natural place, of the growth. 



i 



106 

time of springing, flowering, seeding and decaying of each, with 
the best method of culture that is known, wherein the Gardener 
is to give his assistance, and speak either from his own knowledge 
and experience, or produce his authority (if he speaks upon the 
declaration of others). The subject matter being in the first 
place ascertained, the next will be to point out wherein the vir- 
tue or valuable and useful part (either as to a nutritive or medi- 
cinal quality to man or other animals, or as an instrument in 
preparing or fitting any other things for use) resides ; whether 
in the whole plant or any of its parts, as in the flower cup, 
flower chive, seed, or coat of seed, pith, bark, or any, and which, 
part of bark, skin or any other covering, root, or in short any 
other part of the subject, together with the best and easiest 
method of developing and exhibiting its properties unaltered. 

** The theory of ascertaining the virtue of plants from their 
sensible qualities is too superficial, as is the doctrine that plants 
of the same genus or class are of similar properties, or that much 
of these properties may be collected from the place of their 
native growth. These, and all such schemes as these, can never 
bring mankind into any real knowledge of the distinguishing 
properties, so as to enable them to make right use of the good, 
and guard against the bad qualities which they possess. This 
only can be learned Jby making particular experiments upon 
every particular part of each plant. An instance of which, to go 
no further than the product of almost every (sic) 
may be seen in the poppy, the meal of whose seed is a mild nu- 
tritive Balsamic, and the juice, besides the bitter taste and rancid 
smell, which lie obvious, is possessed of that amazing faculty of 
depriving the bodily organs of the power of sensation, which 
nothing but actual trial could possibly discover. So that in short 
my intention in founding this practical Professorship of Physio- 
logy is, that the Reader shall in public experimentally exhibit to 
young persons the most easy and natural, and best approved 
method of discovering and demonstrating the medical or nutri- 
tive, or domestic properties of bodies of the Mineral and 
Vegetable Kingdoms, and make the object of his private experi- 
ments and disquisitions their more hidden and concealed pro- 
perties, but to publish them for public good as soon as discovered, 
and to make those several parts of all, which have been looked 
upon as useful in gouty cases, the first objects of his inquiry ; 



107 

and gee which are useful, and wherein they are so, and which 
are worthless, so as to throw them aside." 

On the whole 

*^ My intention is that this shall be an Experimental Lecture, 
wherein something shall be shewed, something shall be done^ 
and something shall be read by the Lecturer to the young 
Students who attend his Lectures, the number of which is set 
forth in my Will. That is, the natural bodies which are the 
subject of experiment or of inquiry shall be exhibited by the 
Lecturer to the Students, by laying specimens of each before 
them which are genuine, and the obvious and primary properties 
as they appear in shattered condition pointed out, so that they 
may be distinguished by their peculiar characteristicks as far as 
can be this way done from all other bodies whatsoever. In the 
next place, there shall be a course of experiments made and 
exhibited by the Lecturer to the said Students, upon the natural 
bodies so exhibited to them in the way of Chymical Analysis, 
beginning with the gentlest and most simple operations, and 
proceeding as much as may be in a geometrical gradation to the 
more complex, in the manner of Boerhaave's Ghymistry ; whereby 
the more hidden properties of natural bodies, and the relative 
qualities and effects which they have upon each other, and the 
changes which they operate on one another, may be developed 
as much as may be and faithfully laid open. 

'* And lastly, that along with, or after such exhibition and 
course of experiments (which experiments shall at least be thirty 
different set processes and operations), that the Professor or 
Lecturer shall, in a plain discourse in English, set forth all the 
phaenomena that occurred in the performing or exhibiting any 
and each of them, in the natural order that they appeared, with 
the final result of each, and what general doctrines may be 
raised from the whole ; and that after the whole course of 
thirty-six Lectures and thirty Experiments thus read and ex- 
hibited to twelve Students at least, and their respective per« 
sonal signing the certificate mentioned in my Will, that the said 
Lecturer, before he receives the said salary, or any part thereof, 
deliver, or cause to be delivered to the yice-Chancellor of the 
University of Cambridge for the time being, two copies, fairly 
written, of one of the Lectures which had been read by him 



108 

within the course exhibited that year, one of the said copies, 
signed and dated by the said yice-Chancellor, and theLecturer,'to 
be laid up in the Public Library of the Uniyersity and the other 
in the Library of Trinity College, annually for ever; such 
Lecture each year being different from that of the preceding 
year, and yet so connected in general as to form a rational 
"Series of experimental doctrines : And as to the Gardener of the 
Physic or Public Garden of the said University, it is required 
that before the Legacy devised to him by my Will, or any part 
of the said Legacy be paid to him, that he shall have furnished 
to the said Lecturer of Physiology all such vegetables or parts of 
vegetables, being of the natural growth of these Kingdoms, as he 
may require, or shall be necessary or useful to him in the course 
of the said Lecture, of which delivery the Professor or the major 
part of the twelve Students, required by my Will to attend the 
said Lecture, shall sign a certificate, to be by him delivered to 
the Master and Senior Fellows of Trinity College ; and that the 
said Gardener for the time being shall at the time of delivering 
the said certificate, deliver also an account in writing of ten 
different experiments which he had or shall have tried within 
the course of the preceding year, and which relate and tend to 
illustrate the rational culture of two at least of such vegetables 
as are most useful for food in the first place, and in the next as 
medicines to man, or any species of animals, setting forth therein 
the nature, qualities or composition of the several sorts of soil or 
composts, the degree of moisture or dampness, heat and cold, 
the effects of transplanting, grafting, inoculating, pruning, or 
other manual operations, on the vegetable or soil it was planted 
or grew in, which have by his own experience been found useful 
or hurtful to the growth of all and each of the several species of 
plants, which are by him subjected to trial, together with a 
detail of the said experiments, in the order tried by him, and 
the good or pernicious effects of each honestly set forth ; and 
herein I more particularly recommend an inquiry into the nature 
of such vegetables as will grow on sandy and gravelly or rocky 
soils and mountainous places which are now commonly naked, 
and reputed irremediably barren, which may be useful for food, 
medicine, manufactures or timber; and also such manures or 
composts, and intermixing or changing several soils, which may 
promote the growth of useful vegetables on such soils ; making 



109 

inqmry in our own and foreign nations what vegetables of any 
kind grow naturally therein, and trying whether by culture of 
any sort, or meliorating the several different earths, they may 
not be improved, so that those parts of the earth which are now 
useless or barren may bring forth something that may in some 
way be beneficial ; and that the said Gardener's labours and 
experiments herein may be of use to mankind, I forbid him to 
spend his time in such trifling occupations as those people called 
Florists commonly spend their time on, as varying the colour or 
increasing the size of a tulip, ranunculus, &c., but in the culture 
of plants, useful as aforesaid to mankind, so as by a sagacious 
and well planned series of useful trials, a good and sure founda- 
tion may be laid for a system of rational agriculture. 

^* I recommend, in the first place, an Experimental Analysis 
of Lime Stones, their various kinds, and distinguishing marks, 
and the comparative goodness of each, and particularly wherein 
their activity lies, as experiments shall discover, and how and 
what effects they produce on animal and vegetable bodies, or 
different soils, and on what soils or kinds of soils they are more 
or less beneficial or hurtful, and what vegetables they assist or 
deprave the growth and goodness of, and in what quantity the 
several kinds of it may be best applied as medicine or manure. 
And as I have devised one-fifth part of the net produce of the 
rents of the Estate at Longsdon to be paid yearly to the 6ar« 
doner of the Public <}arden of the University of Cambridge, my 
Will is, that the said Gardener, besides furnishing such plants as 
may be required by the Physiological Lecturer as necessary for 
his Lecture shall, in consideration of such his share of the said 
rent, apply himself to investigate the nature and best method of 
such herbs of all sorts shrubs and trees, as are useful for food to 
man or cattle, and will by culture be made to grow on boggy, 
sandy, gravelly, or any other kind of land, which at present is 
by the said properties, or some other bad qualities, barren and 
unproductive of anything useful ; and as the Moorlands of Staf- 
fordshire, near Longsdon, furnish many kinds of soil which are 
now unfruitful, and the Estate itself is naked of wood about 
the house, and all the hills around it void of trees, while the 
Alps and many parts of the Highlands of Scotland, and north 
parts of America are clothed with useful timber, though in a 
loftier, colder and more barren situation than any part of the 



110 

Moorlands or Peak, my Will is, that the said Gardener' do, in 
the first, apply himself to the surrounding the said Farm at 
Longsdon with hedges that may shelter and be of use in keeping 
the inclosures warm, and also in planting it with such trees, 
either single in rowsy or in clumps, as by experience are 
found to flourish in such situations and such soils as that of 
Longsdon. And in doing this I recommend .that he would 
rather employ such shrubs and trees of the growth of cold foreign 
climates, both for fencing and timber, than of those which are in 
use in this nation, still having regard to those of which some 
experience has been had in the Physic Garden of Cambridge, or 
other place within the Gardener's own knowledge, that time and 
costs may not be lost in planting things at Longsdon which 
previous trials have shewn to be such as to promise no good. 
The same rule I would recommend to be followed in culture of 
herbs and grasses on boggy, sandy, gravelly or other such barren 
soils ; that is, to have recourse to the product of such kind of 
places in foreign countries as of like sort with the soil of our 
own, on which however the annual product exceeds that of our 
country. But still not to disregard or neglect the plants 
which are natives of our own barren, — which I know may be 
much meliorated by proper culture. And my Will is, that if 
the said Gardener shall want any portion of land belonging to 
my said Estate at Longsdon, on which he may think it right to 
make plantations of trees, shrubs or herbs, that the College shall 
permit him to have it, and in what quantity, and in what pai% of 
the Estate he shall ;-^-he, the said Gardener, making such abate- 
ment of rent to the Tenant, in proportion to the quantity and 
quality of the land so appropriated as the College shall appoint, 
and this I do on the especiid confidence that such use will be 
made by the Gardener of the land so taken by him as will render 
the Estate better, and not worse, as this last must diminish 
his own salary, and improving the value of the Estate increase 
his own salary in proportion. And my Will is, that fifty trees 
be each year planted on the land» and well fenced." 



Ill 



XII. The Disney Professorship of Archjeology. 

The Indenture, made May 28, 1851, between John Disney, Esq., 
of the Hyde, in the Parish of Ingatestone, in the county of 
Essex, of the one part, and the Chancellor, Masters and Scholars 
of the Uniyersity of Cambridge of the other part, recites that 
the said John Disney had recently presented to the University 
his collection of statues and works of art ; that he is desirous of 
founding and endowing a Professorship in the said University, to 
be called the Disney Professorship of Archaeology, and of pro« 
viding a fund for the payment of a Professor, who shall deliver 
Lectures on the subject of antiquities and other matters and 
things connected with antiquarian research and the fine arts ; and 
that he had transferred into the names of the Chancellor, 
Masters and Scholars, the sum of £1000 3 per Cent. Consolidated 
Bank Annuities to be held by them upon tiie Trusts thereinafter 
declared. 

It is then declared and agreed :— 

1. That the Chancellor, Masters and Scholars shall, as soon 
as conveniently may be, establish and maintain in the said Uni- 
versity a Professorship, to be called the Disney Professorship of 
Archaeology, and pay the annual proceeds of the said Bank 
Annuities to the Professor for the time being. 

2. That the first appointment to the said Professorship 
shall be made by the said John Disney, who shall and may 
during his life, so often as the office shall become vacant, of his 
own free will appoint by writing under his hand and seal a 
person to hold the said Professorship, such person being a 
Member of the University of Cambridge, who has taken the 
Degree of Master of Arts or some higher Degree in the same 
University. 

3. That after the death of the said John Disney, whenever 
the said Professorship shall become vacant by effluxion of time, 
or by the death or resignation of the Professor, or from any 
other cause wl^atever, it shall be lawful for the Vice-Chancellor 
and Heads of Colleges, and in the event of their disability from 



112 

absence or illness, their respective deputies or locum tenentes, 
and thej are hereby required, within six calendar months after 
any yacancy, to nominate and appoint the same or any other 
Member of the said Unirersity who shall have taken the Degree 
of Master of Arts, or some higher Degree, to hold the said 
Professorship. 

4. That it shall be the duty of the said Professor to deliver 
in the course of each academical year, at such days and hours as 
the Yice-Chancellor shall appoint, six lectures at least on the 
subject of classical, mediseval and other antiquities, the fine 
arts, and all matters and things connected therewith. 

5. That the Professor may hold his office for five years, 
but no longer, unless he be re-appointed in manner herein- 
before described ; and that haying in each academical year 
delivered six lectures as aforesaid to the satisfaction of the Vic^ 
Chancellor and Heads of OoUeires, he shall be entitled to receive 
the di.idend3 and profits arising for that year from the above- 
named Bank Annuities. 

6. That if the Professor shall in any year fail to deliver 
six lectures as aforesaid, and shall not give te the Yice-Chancellor 
and Heads of Colleges a satisfactory reason for such failure, or if 
he shall at any time conduct himself in a manner unbecoming his 
station and position in the University, it shall be lawful for the 
Yice-Chancellor, with the concurrence of a majority of the Heads 
of Colleges, to declare the said Professorship vacant, and there- 
upon a new Professor shall be appointed in the manner before 
described. 

And lastly, that whatever dividends and profits may accrue 
during any vacancy of the Professorship shall be paid to the 
Professor next appointed in the manner aforesaid. 



Camibridge: Printed at the University Preu. 



TRUSTS, STATUTES AND DIRECTIONS 



AFFEGTING THE 



St|0lars|ip anir ^pri^es of % ltmlrers% 



115 



SCHOLAESHIPS OF THE UNIVERSITY. 



I. The Craven Scholarships. 

1. EoGtract from the Will of John Lord Craven. 28 May 

1647. 

Item. I give and bequeath to my Executor all my lands and 
hereditaments in Canserne in the County of Sussex (which said 
lands I bought of Mr. Maynard) to this intent and purpose ; 
that out of the yearly profits of the said lands, tenements and 
hereditaments one hundred pounds a year be raised toward^ 
the maintenance of four poor Scholars, whereof two to be in 
the University of Oxford, and two in the University of Cam^ 
bridge ; the Scholars who are to have the benefit of this main* 
tenance in Oxford shall be chosen by the Vice-Chancellor, the 
King's Professors and the Orator there for the time being, or 
the greater part of them, and so likewise in Cambridge by the 
Vice-Chancellor, the King's Professors and the Orator there 
for the time being, or the greater part of them : Yet my will is 
that if any of my name or kindred shall happen to be poor, and 
to be a Scholar in either University, he shall be preferred to 
have the benefit of this maintenance before any other Scholar 
whatsoever ; and my will is that the said annuity and mainten- 
ance shall cease and determine to any such Scholar after he hath 
been in the University by the space of fourteen years; and 
likewise it shall cease and determine to any such Scholar that 
shall attain unto any preferment of a double value, and thea 
the said annuity so determining shall be bestowed upon some 
other poor Scholar. 

2. Conveyance and Indenture of William Lord Craven^ 

6 July, 1664. 

An Indenture made 5 July 1664 between William Lord 
Craven of the one part, and Sir John Baber of Covent Garden 
in the County of Middlesex Knight, Dr. Allestry, Dr. Fell 

VOL. II. B 



116 

and Dr. Dolben of the other part, recites the above extract 
from the Will of John Lord Craven (28 May 1647) ; recites 
also that the said William Lord Craven, although he had just 
cause to take exception to the said Will, yet was content and 
ready to confirm the said charitable uses appointed out of the 
said manor and farm of Canseme, and other the premises ; and 
although he were in parts beyond the seas at the time of the 
making of the said Will, yet by his officers in England he did 
pay the Scholars appointed in both the said Universities, 
according to the intention of the said Will, until the late 
usurping power did possess the whole estate of the said William 
Lord Craven, and by colour of a commission of their own 
making, by which they did appoint commissioners of their own 
choosing, who by colour of the said commission did enter upon 
the said manor and farm of Canseme and other the premises, 
and did dispose thereof to such hands that did determine the 
l^nts and profits thereof, and did not pay the said Scholars, by 
which means they came much in arrear ; and the said William 
Lord Craven returning into England as soon as possible he 
might, did regain the possession of the said manor and pre- 
mises, and was ready and willing to have the said charitable 
uses performed. The Indenture recites further, that the said 
William Lord Craven, for the better performance of the said 
charitable uses, by the assent of both the said Universities, by 
his deed of bargain and sale bearing date with these presents 
and enrolled in the high Court of Chancery, for the considera- 
tion therein mentioned, had bargained and sold the said manor 
of Canseme and other the premises unto the said Sir John 
Baber, Richard AUestry, John Fell and John Dolben, their heirs 
and assigns, and to the use of them, their heirs and assigns, 
for the better management of the rents, issues and profits of 
the premises and performance of the said charitable uses. 

The Indenture then declares that the Scholars that are from 
time to time hereafter nominated by the said William Lord 
Craven during his life-time, and after his death that are duly 
elected in either of the said Universities or hereafter shall be 
duly elected according to the intention of the said last Will, 
shall have their respective stipends of twenty-five pounds per 
annum duly paid by half-yearly payments, that is to say, twelve 



117 

pounds ten shillings at the end of every six months, as the rents of 
the said manor and premises can be got ; and the said Scholars in 
the first place to be satisfied and paid the said pensions or salaries. 
The Indenture declares further that all arrears due to the 
then existing Scholars should be paid as soon as there should 
be a surplus out of the rents and profits of the estate over and 
above the said yearly payment of one hundred pounds to be 
paid to the said Scholars. 

The Indenture then provides for the safe custody of all deeds 
and writings, and for the renewal of the trust from time to 
time for ever. 

3. Memorandwm ; and Letter of William Lord Craven, 

13 August 1681. 

Memorandum. That the Vice- Chancellor and other electors 
being met at the time and place and for the purpose above 
specified (2 August 1681, for the election of a Scholar) taking 
notice that the late Exhibitioner, John Atkinson, has dis- 
continued from the University almost the whole time of his 
enjoying the said Exhibition, contrary to the design and will 
of the benefactor, did thereupon require a promise from the 
Scholar recommended to them by the Lord Craven to keep 
constant residence in the University during the whole time of 
his enjoying the benefit of the Exhibition, and never to go out 
of it without leave first asked and obtained from the Vice- 
Chancellor for the time being ; which thing he promised duly 
to observe. 

At the same time also it was agreed by the persons above-' 
mentioned, that a letter, to be drawn up by the Vice-Chancellor, 
should be sent to the Right Honourable the Lord Craven, 
signifying those their proceedings, which was accordingly done ; 
and an answer from his Lordship returned, which I was 
ordered by the Vice-ChaDcellor to transcribe in this place, as 
foUoweth, — 

"Sir, Drury House, 13 August 1681. 

Your and the rest of the electors ready compliance with the 
recommendation of Robert Tophan to one of my late brother's 
Exhibitions (signified by your letter received the other day) has 

B 2 



118 

very much obliged me. I am also sensible of your great piety 
and care to fulfil my brother's intention in his Will, which, 
I agree with you, could be no other than that the Exhibitioners 
should continue and reside in the University, and therefore do 
fully concur with you in your injunction of residence upon the 
person now elected, and desire that all future elections into those 
Exhibitions may be subject to such construction and condition. 
But as for Robert Pearce, seeing he was not expressly 
limited when elected, and (as you are pleased to observe) has 
but little longer to enjoy it, I am content, if you and the rest 
of the electors please, that he hold it till his time expire. In 
the interim I shall endeavour to speak with him, having some 
intimation where to find him, and acquaint him with your and 
my sentiments upon his non-residency. I am in all readiness 
to serve you. Sir, 

Your most affectionate 

Friend and Servant, 
For the Rev. Dr. Humphrey Gower, G. Craven." 

Vioe-Chancellor of the University of Cambridge. 

4. Bides (made 8 Dec. 1701) for the choice of the Scholars. 

Lect: et concess : Cum Scholares duos liberali admodum Exhibi* 
27 Novembris 1701. tione sustentari curaverit lUustrissimus Comes 
de Craven, in iis autem eligendis nullam omnino assignaverit 
methodum; placeat vobis ut dignissimus Dominus Pro-Can- 
cellarius, Professores Regii, et Orator Publicus per ultimam 
praedicti Comitis voluntatem electores hac in parte nominati, 
una cum reverendis viris Domino Gulielmo Dawes, et Doctore 
Carolo Roderick, legitimis hujusce donationis Fiduciariis, Syndici 
vestri constituantur ; utque Academiae nomine ipsis aut ipsorum 
ad minus quinque (quorum unus sit Dominus Pro-Cancellarius) 
regularum quae in posteris electionibus ratae sint figendarum 
potestas plena concedatur. 

Rules for the choice of Lord Craven's Scholars (made 8 Dec. 
1701 ) by the Syndics appointed by the University in that 
behalf. 

1. That the yice-Chancellor upon the declaring a vacancy of 
one of the said Scholarships by the majority of the electors 



119 

shall within five days cause a writing under his hand, intimating 
the said vacancy, to be fixed at the door of the public schools, 
and that no election shall be proceeded upon before fourteen days^ 
nor deferred above three months after fixing the said instrument. 

2. That all Scholars who desire to be candidates for the said 
Scholarships shall present themselves within the said fourteen 
days to every one of the electors, to be examined in the lan- 
guages, whereof a competent skill in the Greek and Latin shall 
be a necessary qualification. 

3. That in relation to the difference of standing of each 
candidate an equitable consideration shall be had of their 
improvement in the arts and sciences. 

4. That within six days after the time limited for the said 
examination the Vice- Chancellor shall summon the electors, and 
together with them shall agree upon the time and place for 
making the said election. 

5. That he of those so examined who shall be chosen by the 
majority of the electors then present shall be deemed efiectually 
chosen ; provided there be present at least four of the electors, 
whereof three at least consenting to the election. 

6. That no deputies shall be allowed to vote. 

7. That no Scholar hereafter to be chosen shall be absent 
from the University without the leave of the Vice-Chancellor, 
pursuant to an order made by the electors and approved of by 
a letter from the Right Honourable the Earl of Craven, dated 
13 August 1681, and that such absence shall not be allowed 
upon any account whatsoever for above three months in the year 
without a special licence from the Vice- Chancellor and the 
major part of the Electors then present in the University. 

6. Grace of the Senate^ 31 Oct. 1724. 

Lects et concess: Cum regulac jamprfdem a Syndicis vestris con- 
31 Octobris 1724. gtitutae de forma electionis duorum Scholarium 
ex fundatione Honoratissimi Domini Craven, Baronis de Ryton,in- 
certum reliquerint ejusmodi electionis exitum si forte eligentium 
suffragia in aequales partes fuerint divisae, quod in electione jam 
praesente accidisse compertum est : Placeat vobis, ne lis indi- 
rempta maneat, ut quoad praesentem banc electionem ille e 
candidatis parem sufiragantium numerum habontibus pro electo 



120 

habeatui*, quern Honoratiasimus dominus de Graven, utpote aum« 
mus et praecipuus in illuBtri Fundatoris familia, anteferendum 
duxerit; in futuris autem electionibus, si eadem quae nunc 
sviffragiorum paritas oontigerit, ea pars praevaleat a qua steterit 
Dominus Pro-Cancellarius. 

6. EMract from Order m Chancery^ March 9, 1819. 
Attorney- General v. Bishop of Llandaff, 

This Court doth order that the annual allowance of twenty- 
five pounds each to the four poor scholars to be hereafter elected, 
as mentioned in the Testator's Will, be increased to the annual 
sum of fifty pounds each ; and that the number of scholars be 
increased by adding six more, to be elected in the same manner 
as the present scholars are elected, and as directed by 
the said Testator^s Will, that is to say, three scholars from 
each of the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge, with the 
same annual allowance of fifty pounds each ; and that the said 
annual allowance to the said ten scholars shall cease after the 
expiration of seven years from the date of their election, or on 
any such scholars attaining to any preferment of double value ; 
and the same preference to poor scholars of the Testator's name 
and kindred, as mentioned in his Will, to be preserved with 
respect to the said six additional scholars. 

7- EMract from Order in Chancery, Jwne 22, 1841. 
Attorney- General v. Bishop of Llandaff, 

His Lordship doth order that out of the surplus income of 
the Trust Estate and Funds in the petition mentioned an addi- 
tion of twenty-five pounds per annum be made to each of the 
ten now existing scholarships in the petition mentioned, so as to 
make the yearly amount and value of each and ^y^r-^ such ten 
scholarships the sum of seventy-five pounds a-piece. 

N.B. The last appointment of new Trustees was made July 
17, 1850 ; the estates were then conveyed to Charles James, 
Lord Bishop of London, John, Lord Bishop of Lincoln, Charles 
Richard, Lord Bishop of Winchester, Samuel, Lord Bishop of 
Oxford, John, Lord Bishop of Chester, and the Very Reverend 
Henry Hart Milman, Dean of St Paul's. 



121 



II. The Battib Scholarship. 

1. Dr. WiUiam Battie's Deed of Gift 

This Indenture, made the thirtieth day of September, in the 
twenty-first year of the reign of our Sovereign Lord George the 
Second, by the grace of God of Great Britain, France and 
Ireland King, Defender of the Faith, &c., and in the year of 
our Lord seventeen hundred and forty- seven, between William 
Battle, Doctor in Physic and Fellow of the College of Phy- 
sicians in London, of the one part, and the Chancellor, Masters 
and Scholars of the University of Cambridge, of the other part : 
Whereas the said William Battle was educated at King's 
College in the said University of Cambridge, and during his 
scholarship in the said college had one of the exhibitions com- 
monly called Lord Craven's Exhibitions, given unto and con- 
ferred upon him, whereby he was enabled to maintain himself in 
the said University and encouraged to proceed in his studies ; 
]Now this Indenture witnesseth that the said William Battle, 
being duly sensible of the great benefit he received from the 
said exhibition, and also considering that benefactions of this 
nature tend to the advancement of religion and learning, and 
are a great support to such scholars who unhappily labour under 
indigent circumstances, out of a grateful sense of his own obliga- 
tions to the said University, and as a perpetual acknowledgment 
for the same, and in consideration of the sum of five shillings of 
good and lawful money of Great Britain to the said William 
Battle in hand "well and truly paid by the said Chancellor, 
Masters and Scholars at or before the sealing and delivery of 
these presents, the receipt whereof is hereby acknowledged, 
hath given, granted, bargained, sold, aliened, enfeoffed and con- 
firmed, and by these presents doth give, grant, bargain, sell, 
alien, enfeoff and confirm unto the said Chancellor, Masters and 
Scholars, and their successors for ever, all that messuage or 
tenement with the appurtenances now or sometime heretofore 



122 

called or known by the name of Pogell*8, or by what other 
name or names soever the same is or hath been called or known, 
situate, lying and being in Hitcham in the county of Suffolk, 
and wherein one John Turner did formerly inhabit and dwell ; 
and all those several closes, pieces or parcels of ground with 
the appurtenances commonly called or known by the names of 
the Pightles, containing by estimation one acre, be the same 
more or less ; the lawn, containing by estimation two acres and 
twenty poles, be the same more or less ; Great Hall Croft, con- 
taining by estimation two acres, one rood and fifteen poles, be 
the same more or less; Little Hall Croft, containing by estima- 
tion one acre, two roods and four-and-twenty poles, be the same 
more or less ; a piece of land, parcel of the lawn, containing by 
estimation two acres, one rood and twenty poles, be the same 
more or less; Home Croft, containing by estimation three 
acres and five-and-twenty poles, be the same more or less; 
Middle Croft, containing by estimation four acres, be the same 
more or less ; the meadow, containing by estimation two acres, 
one rood and four-and-thirty poles, be the same more or less ; 
Sitheridge's, containing by estimation two acres and one rood, 
be the same more or less ; Swaymere field, containing by esti- 
mation three roods and seven poles, be the same more or less ; 
and Swaymere's meadow, containing by estimation three roods 
and twenty- five poles, be the same more or less ; or by what other 
name or names soever the said closes, pieces or parcels of ground, 
or any of them, or any part of any of them, now are or at 
any time or times heretofore have been called or known, all 
which said closes, pieces or parcels of ground are situate, lying 
and being in Hitcham aforesaid and in Brettenham, or in one 
of them, in the said county of Suffolk, and are now in the tenure 
or occupation of John Ranson, his assignee, assigns or under- 
tenants, and all houses, outhouses, edifices, buildings, barns, 
stables, orchards, gardens, fore-yards, back-sides, trees, woods, 
underwoods, hedges, ditches, fences, ways, waters, paths, pas- 
sages, profits, commodities and hereditaments whatsoever to the 
said messuage or tenement and closes, pieces or parcels of land, 
or any of them, or any part of them belonging, or in any wise 
appertaining, or accepted, reputed or taken as part, parcel or 
member thereof; and the reversion and reversions, remainder 



123 • 

and remainders, yearly and other rents and profits of the 
premises, and of every part and parcel thereof with the appur- 
tenances ; and all deeds, evidences and writings concerning the 
said premises only now in the custody of the said William 
Battle, or which he may get or come by without suit in law : 
To have and to hold the said messuage or tenement, lands, 
hereditaments, and all and singular other the premises herein- 
before mentioned and intended to be hereby granted, with their 
and every of their appurtenances, unto the said Chancellor, 
Masters and Scholars, and their successors, to the only use and 
behoof of the said Chancellor, Masters and Scholars, and their 
successors for ever. And it is hereby declared by the said 
William Battie, and the said Chancellor, Masters and Scholars, 
that the gift, grant, bargain and sale of the said messuage or 
tenements, lands and premises, mentioned or intended to be 
hereby made unto the said Chancellor, Masters and Scholars, is 
and are so given, granted, bargained, sold, alienated, enfeoffed 
and confirmed, or meant, mentioned, or intended hereby so to 
be, in trust to and for the several uses, intents and purposes 
hereinafter mentioned, expressed and declared, as to, for and 
concerning the same, that is to say, in trust that the said 
Chancellor, Masters and Scholars, and their successors, shall 
pay the clear net yearly rents and profits of all the said messuage 
or tenement, lands and premises, (after deduction of the money 
they shall from time to time lay out in repairs, and the charges 
they shall from time to time be put to in collecting the rents or 
any other matter or thing relating to the said trust,) by two 
half-yearly payments in the year, the first payment thereof to 
begin and be made upon the feast-day of Saint Michael the 
Archangel next ensuing the date hereof, for the term of three 
years, unto such scholar of the said University of Cambridge as 
the said William Battie shall by any writing under his hand 
and seal direct and appoint, and so from time to time as often 
as any vacancy shall happen during the life of the said William 
Battie : Provided always that it shall be lawful to and for the 
said William Battie from time to time at his will and pleasure, 
by any writing under his hand and seal, to be delivered to the 
Vice-Chancellor of the said University for the time being, to re- 
move such scholar, and to alter and change the term hereby limited 



% 124 

for payment of the said exhibition to such particular scholar, 
and to discontinue the said payment to him, and likewise to 
nominate another scholar to succeed and enjoy the same ; And 
further, that upon every vacancy, even during the life of the 
said William Battie, in case he shall neglect or refuse to appoint 
VFithin twelve calendar months next after such vacancy is 
signified to him by letter from the Vice-chancellor or proper 
officer of the University for the time being, the Vice-Chanoellor 
of the said University for the time being shall and may nomi- 
nate and appoint a scholar of the said University to supply 
such vacancy so happening as aforesaid, and the scholar who 
succeeds upon such or any other vacancy shall be entitled to the 
profits of the said exhibition from the time of the then late 
vacancy. And it is hereby declared by and between the said 
William Battie and the said Chancellor, Masters and Scholars, 
that the Vice-Chancellor of the said University for the time 
being shall, after the decease of the said William Battie, and 
after the expiration of the term for which the scholar so last 
nominated shall be enabled to hold the said exhibition, admit 
such scholar as shall be elected by such members of the said 
University in such manner and so qualified to take the said 
exhibition and to hold the same for such time under and 
subject to the rules, conditions, limitations and restrictions 
specified and declared in the instrument to these presents an- 
nexed : Provided also that it shall and may be lawful to and 
for the said William Battie, by any writing under his hand and 
seal, or by his last Will and Testament or Codicil, to make 
any additions or other alterations in or to the said rules, condi- 
tions, limitations and restrictions hereunto annexed, except as to 
the second and seventh Articles, which are to be irrevocable, 
and so much of the first as makes the Vice-Chancellor or his 
Deputy one of the electors, provided such additions or other 
alterations are not contrary to or inconsistent with the Statutes 
and Orders of the said University: Provided always, and it is 
hereby further declared, that in case it shall happen after the 
decease of the said William Battie that such appointment, elec- 
tion and admission of such scholar in manner aforesaid shall 
not from time to time be made and completed within the space 
of three calendar months after the death of such scholar, either 



125 

4ying in the possession of the said exhibition, or after the expi- 
ration of the time limited and appointed for each such respective 
scholar to hold and enjoy the said exhibition, that then and in 
such case it shall and may be lawful to and for the Provost of 
King's College aforesaid for the time being, by any writing 
under his hand and seal, and even during his absence from the 
said college, to nominate and appoint at any time within six 
calendar months after the time elapsed for such appointment, 
election and admission as aforesaid, any scholar of the said 
University to succeed to and to hold and enjoy the said exhibi- 
tion in such manner and for such time and under and subject 
to such rules, conditions, limitations and restrictions as aforesaid ; 
and for want and in default of such nomination and appoint- 
ment by the said Provost of King's College for the time being 
within six months as aforesaid, that then it shall and may be 
lawful to and for the right heirs of the said William Battle to 
enter into and upon the said messuage or tenement, lands and 
premises, and to hold and enjoy the same to them and their 
heirs for ever in as full and ample manner as if these presents 
had never been made : And the said William Battle for him- 
self, his heirs, executors and administrators, doth covenant and 
grant to and with the said Chancellor, Masters and Scholars, 
and their successors, by these presents, that they the said 
Chancellor, Masters and Scholars, and their successors, shall and 
lawfully may from henceforth for ever hereafter, on performing 
the trusts herein-before mentioned, peaceably and quietly have, 
hold, occupy, possess and enjoy the said messuage or tenement, 
lands, hereditaments and premises hereby given and granted, or 
intended so to be, with their appurtenances, free, clear and dis- 
charged of and from all former and other gifts, grants, bargains, 
sales, feoffments, jointures, dowers, estates, entails, rents, rent- 
charges, arrears of rent, statutes, judgments, recognizances, 
statutes merchant and of the staple^ extents, and of and from all 
other titles, troubles, charges and incumbrances, had, committed, 
done or suffered by him the said William Battle, his heirs> 
executors or administrators, or any other person or persons 
claiming or to claim by, from or under him, them, or any or 
either of them: In witness whereof to one part of these present 
Indentures remaining with the said Chancellor, Masters and 



126 

Scholars of the University of Cambridge, the said William 
Battie hath set his hand and seal, and to the other part thereof 
remaining with the said William Battie, the said Chancellor, 
Masters and Scholars of the University .of Cambridge have 
affixed their common seal the day and year first above written. 



2. RuleSy conditions, limitations and restrictions concerning the 
election of one Scholar of the University of Cambridge; 
which rules, conditions, limitations and restrictions are referred 
to by the Indenture to which these presents are annexed, made 
between William Battie, Doctor in Physic, of the one part, 
and the Cha/ncelhr, Masters and Scholars of the University of 
Cambridge of the other part, hearing date the ^Oth day of 
September in the year of our Lord 1747. 

1. The Vice-Chancellor or his Deputy, the Provost of 
King's College, the King*'s Professors of Law, Physic and 
Divinity, and the two Proctors for the time being, shall be the 
electors. And in case the Provost of King's College shall be 
absent from the University at the time of the examination of the 
candidates, or disabled by sickness or otherwise from attending 
the same ; in such case the Vice- Provost of the said college, or 
if he is absent from the University or disabled by sickness or 
otherwise from attending the said examination, the senior 
Fellow then resident in college shall have a right to attend the 
said examination, and shall be one of the electors in the room 
of the said Provost. 

2. The Vice-Chancellor or his Deputy, upon every vacancy, 
shall summon the electors then resident in the University to 
such place as he shall think proper ; and if the majority of the 
said electors so met together shall then declare by any writing 
under their hands that the scholarship is vacant, the Vice- 
Chancellor or his Deputy shall within five days afterwards 
cause the said declaration to be affixed upon the door of the 
schools or other public place belonging to the said University. 
And the Vice-Chancellor or his Deputy shall likewise, in the 
same instrument concerning the said declaration, appoint a time 



127 

and place for the examination of the candidates. And no 
examination or election shall be proceeded upon till twenty- 
eight days are fully complete and ended after the affixing the 
said declaration. 

3. Every candidate shall, within fourteen days after the 
affixing the said declaration, visit each of the electors then 
resident in the said University, and shall give notice by a Latin 
epistle to such elector that he is a candidate : and in case he 
neglects visiting in manner aforesaid within that time he shall 
be incapable of being elected. 

4. No one shall be capable of being elected who has been 
admitted into the college he first belonged to above three years, 
or who is any ways entitled to receive any benefit or advantage 
from either of the exhibitions commonly called Lord Craven's 
exhibitions. And in case any person after his being elected 
and admitted to hold or enjoy this scholarship shall be admitted 
to or any ways entitled to hold and enjoy the said Lord Craven's 
exhibition, his right to this scholarship shall thencefrom abso* 
lutely cease and determine. 

5. The electors and candidates shall be present together at 
the time and place appointed in the said declaration ; and the 
said candidates shall be examined before one another in the 
presence of each other by such of the electors who shall then 
be present, to the intent the candidates may be witnesses 
of each other^s abilities, and that all partiality may, as much as 
possible, be prevented in the electors. And no candidate shall 
be capable of being elected who shall not have been so examined^ 
nor shall any elector have a right to vote who was not present 
at the said examination. 

6. A competent skill in the Greek and Latin languages 
shall be a necessary qualification. But in respect to the differ- 
ence of standing of each candidate an equitable consideration 
shall be bad of their improvement in the arts and sciences. 

7. As soon as the examination is onded, the Vice-Chan* 
cellor or his Deputy shall declare to the electors then present 
the time and place he appoints for making the election. 

8. He of those so examined who shall be chosen by a 
majority of the electors then present at the time and place 
before appointed, and who were present at the said examination. 



128 

shall be deemed effectually chosen. And in case there should 
happen an equality of votes for two or more candidates, he 
shall be deemed effectually chosen whom the Provost of King'^s 
College, if he is then present and was present at the said 
examination, shall declare for. And in case the said Provost is 
not then present, or was not present at the said examination, 
he shall be deemed effectually chosen whom the Yice-Ohancelloi* 
or his Deputy shall declare for. 

9. Every scholar, during the time of his enjoying this 
scholarship, shall reside at least nine calendar months every 
year in the University, except he is a graduate in physic or 
designs to profess the same, and produces once every year, if 
required by any of the electors, a certificate signed by one 
hospital physician in London, or bills of mortality, signifying 
that the said scholar diligently attends the said physician in 
visiting the patients of the said hospital ; in which case my 
intention is that the residence of such scholar in the University 
shall be hereby absolutely dispensed with during his attending 
on the said physician. But no other scholar shall be absent 
above three calendar months every year from the University 
without leave granted to him, under the hand of the major part 
of the electors then present in the University : and in case he 
absents himself for a longer time without such leave his right 
to this scholarship shall immediately cease and determine. But 
my intention and desire is that the electors shall not be diJ9tcult 
in granting such leave provided it be not longer than for one 
year at once, which leave however may be renewed in like 
manner from year to year in case the scholar can satisfy a 
major part of the electors then present in the University that 
he is prosecuting his studies during such his absence, and in 
case that he brings, when required by any of the electors, a 
certificate of his good behaviour under the hands of three or 
more neighbouring clergymen of the Church of England, pro- 
vided likewise that he continues a member of the University. 

10. When any scholar shall have been admitted nine 
years into the college to which he first belonged, or shall have 
obtained any ecclesiastical benefice or preferment, his right to 
enjoy this scholarship shall then cease and determine. But 
it shall and may be lawful nevertheless for any scholar to hold 



129 

and enjoy this scholarship for such time as aforesaid, notwith- 
standing such scholar shall after such election and admission to 
the same have obtained a fellowship in some one college of the 
University of Cambridge. 

11. If the Provost of King's College shall happen to be 
Vice-chancellor at the time of the said examination and elec- 
tion, in such case the Vice-Provost of King's College, or if he 
is absent or otherwise disabled from attending the same, the 
senior Fellow then resident in the said college shall be one 
of the electors, and the Vice-Chancellor, if there should happen 
an equality of votes, shall, in this case, have a casting vote. 

12. If any doubt should arise after my decease touching 
the intent and meaning of any of the aforesaid rules, or of such 
as I may hereafter give, which I reserve to myself to do, the 
same shall be interpreted and determined by the Provost of 
King's College, and his determination shall be acquiesced in by 
the electors and scholars. 

W, Battib. 



130 



III. Sir William Bbowne^s Foundations. 

1. Extract from the Will of Sir William Browne^ Knight^ M.D., 
of Queen-square^ in the parish of St, George the Martyr, 
Middlesex, dated 11 February 1770, and a Codicil thereto^ 
dated^ 21 July 1773. 

Hb subjects his estates In divers places to a perpetual rent* 
charge of twenty guineas a year, which (says he) I devise to be 
paid yearly from my decease, clear of taxes and disbursements, 
to the Chancellor, Masters and Scholars of the University of 
Cambridge and their successors, in trust for founding a Classic 
Scholarship, by electing the best classic scholar who shall offer 
himself for examination within a year of his matriculation, 
public notice being given by the Vice-Chancellor a month before 
such election. I will that my Scholar so to be elected shall 
enjoy the rent-charge, with arrears which may happen by 
vacancy, for seven years on these conditions; that he shall 
admit himself at Peter-h<Mise, and reside there every entire 
term during his undergraduateship ; that he shall behave well, 
studiously and religiously, and give up to the Fellows' table 
every Sunday a copy of Greek or Latin verses ; that he shall 
go to lectures vrith the Mathematic Professor for three years, 
being sensible from depending on my own sole strength how 
much Labor improbus may be saved by such assistance ; that he 
shall regularly and reputably perform all his College and 
University exercises, an Act, first, second and third Opponencies 
in the Sophs' Schools, and take the degrees of Bachelor and 
Master of Arts. 

I direct my executors to procure a die to be engraved proper 
to strike medals of gold of five guineas value ; the obverse to 
be an imitation of my marble medallion bust, the motto to be 
Esse et tideri** On the exergue in two lines, Gulielmus 
Browne^ Equee, Nat. m. Non, Jan, A. S. mdcxgii ; on the 

* Oreat letters. 



131 

reverse, Apollo radiated, seated on an advanced throne, resting 
his lyre on his left knee with his left hand, and extending his 
right hand with a laurel wreath over the head of a scholar^ 
with a gown and band, kneeling on the steps, and presenting 
a scroll in his right hand, and holding down his square cap 
with his left hand, the motto Stmt sua praemia laudi*; on 
the exergue in two lines, Electus Coll. Med. Lond. Praeses, A. S. 
MDGCLXv. With this shall be struck two gold medals of five 
guineas value, and sent to the Vice-Chancellor of Cambridge 
annually, in the beginning of January, to be given by him at 
the following commencement to two undergraduates, one of 
whom shall deliver to him, in June before, the best Greek ode 
in imitation of Sappho, the other the best Latin ode in imita- 
tion of Horace, on a subject to be appointed by him in January 
before ; which odes shall be fairly written, dated and sub- 
scribed by the authors, in a book to be laid on the register's 
table for public inspection at the commencement. And I charge 
my estates for the perpetual performance of this annual be- 
quest. 

In the Codicil. 

I WILL that a third gold medal, of like kind with those two 
in my Will mentioned, shall be sent by my executor, annually, 
with those two, to the Vice-Chancellor of that University for 
the time being ; to be given by him to the undergraduate 
who shall produce the best Greek epigram, after the model of 
Anthologia, and the best Latin epigram, after the model of 
Martial, on a subject of his appointing ; to be given, all three, 
on the commencement day. 

I charge my estates also with this third medal for ever. 

2. Rules made (18 Jpril 17S2) for the Choice of the Scholar. 

Lect: et Concess: Cum praeclarus vir Gulielmus Browne, eques 
10 Apriiis 1782. auratus, vita functus unum scholarem Graecis 
Latinisque literis optime instructum atque a vobis eligendum 
liberali stipendio auxerit, neque tamen aut electorum numeruni 
praefinire aut ullum quidem eligendi modum statuere curaverit ; 
Placeat vobis ut Dominus Pro-Cancellarius, Dr. Cooke, Dr. Col- 
man, Mr. Borlase, Mr. Kipling, Mr. Seale et Mr. Porter sint 

* Great letters. 
VOL. II. C 



132 

Syndic! vestri, quibus poteBtas sit electores in hac parte designare 
et regulas insuper ad quas futurae omnes cum examinationes 
turn electiones exigantur praescribere ; ita ut quicquid ab iis 
vel majori eorum parte conclusum fuerit, id a vobis ratum fir- 
mumque habeatur. 

RuLBS for the choice of a Scholar on the foundation of Sir Wil- 
liam Browne, Knight, agreed upon by the Syndics appointed 
for that purpose in the above-recited Grace. 

1. The Vice-Chancellor or his deputy, the King*s Pro- 
fessors of Divinity, Law, Physic, Hebrew, and Greek, and the 
Public Orator of the University, all for the time being, shall be 
the electors into the said scholarship. 

2. The Vice-Chancellor or his Deputy, within ten days 
after receiving notice of any vacancy of the said scholarship, 
shall summon the electors then resident in the University to 
such place as he shall think proper ; and if the majority of the 
said electors, so met together, shall then declare, by any writing 
under their hands, that the scholarship is vacant, the Vice- 
Chancellor shall, within five days afterwards, cause the said 
declaration to be a£Gixed on the door of the schools, or other 
public place belonging to the said University ; and no election 
shall be proceeded upon till twenty-eight days are fully com- 
plete and ended after the affixing of the said declaration: 
provided only that if the said scholarship shall become void 
during the long vacation, no public declaration of such vacancy 
shall be fixed upon the door of the schools, or elsewhere, till 
the iOth day of October following, nor any election be pro- 
ceeded upon till the expiration of twenty-eight days from the 
said tenth of October. 

3. Every person, who intends being a candidate for the 
said scholarship, shall, within fourteen days after the affixing of 
the said declaration, visit each of the electors then resident in 
the University, and give notice by a Latin epistle to such 
elector that he is a candidate ; and in case he neglects visiting 
within the time and in the manner aforesaid, he shall be in- 
capable of being elected into that vacancy. 

4. By the will of the founder *' any person shall be 
capable of being elected who shall ofier himself for examination 
within a year from his matriculation f that is, any person shall 



133 

be capable of being elected^ who offers himself for examination 
at any time from the day of his admission into any college in 
either University till the expiration of one whole year from the 
first public matriculation that shall be held after his first coming 
to reside in such college. And evidence of his being ma- 
triculated, as likewise a certificate of the times of his admission, 
and first coming to reside, under the hand and seal of the 
Master or Locumtenens of his college, shall be brought by each 
candidate to the Vice-Chancellor or his Deputy, together with 
the Latin epistle mentioned in the preceding rule. 

5. The examination shall be confined to the Greek and Latin 
languages, composition, ancient history and ancient geography. 

6. Within five days after the expiration of the twenty-eight 
days limited as above for the public notice of the vacancy the 
Vice-Chancellor shall again summon the electors then present 
in the University, and together with them shall fix upon the 
time and place for making the election ; at which time the 
person who shall be chosen by the majority of the electors 
then present shall be deemed effectually chosen; provided 
always that at every election there be present at least four 
of the electors ; and that at every meeting of the electors, 
whether for the purpose of declaring a vacancy, of fixing the 
time of election, or of electing a scholar, in case of an equality 
of voices, the Vice-Chancellor or his Deputy shall have the 
casting vote. 

7. By the will of the founder " The scholar so elected, 
if he is not already a member of Peterhouse, is to admit him- 
self immediately into that college, and to enjoy the benefits of 
his scholarship, with arrears from the vacancy, for seven years 
from the day of his election ; on condition, that he reside there 
every entire term during his undergraduateship ; that he behave 
himself well, studiously and religiously, and give up to the 
Fellows' table every Sunday a copy of Greek or Latin verses ; 
that he go to Lectures with the Mathematical Professor for 
three years ; that he regularly and reputably perform all his 
college and University exercises ; and take the Degrees of 
Bachelor and Master of Arts.*" And proper certificates of his 
having complied with the above conditions shall be annually 
brought to the Vice-Chancellor by such scholar, before he shall 
be entitled to receive his stipend. 

C 2 



134 



IV. Dr. Davies* University Scholarship. 

Dr. Jonathan Davies, late Provost of Eton College, by his 
last will and testament, bearing date July 1804, gave and 
bequeathed to the Vice-chancellor for the time being, and to 
the Provost of King*s College in the University of Cambridge, 
in trust, one thousand pounds in the three per Cents, to found 
a scholarship, to be called " Dr. Davies^ University Scholarship," 
on the same footing with those called the Craven University 
Scholarships, for the greatest proficient in classical learning, the 
candidates to be the same, the examiners the same, only with 
the addition of the Provost of King's College. This he did 
remembering (as he further states in his will) that he wa^ so 
fortunate as to get one of the said University Scholarships, and 
as probably the consideration of his circumstances (recommended 
by the founder or foundjers of those scholarships) weighed 
greatly in his favour, he willed that the same circumstance be 
attended to in the disposal of his scholarship by the examiners, 
and that it be enjoyed by the candidate, on whom the majority 
of the examiners agree to bestow it, the same number of years 
as the above-mentioned Craven Scholarships. 



135 



y. The Bell Scholarships. 



Deed of Foundation for eight Scholarships in the University of 
Cumbridge^ dated 18 July 1810. Inrolled in Chancery^ 14 
August 1810. 

This Indenture, made the eighteenth day of July in the fiftieth 
year of the reign of our Sovereign Lord George the Third, by 
the Grace of God of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and 
Ireland King, Defender of the Faith, and in the year of our 
Lord one thousand eight hundred and ten, between the Reverend 
William Bell, Doctor in Divinity, Prebendary of the Collegiate 
Church of St. Peter in Westminster, of the one part ; and the 
Chancellor, Masters and Scholars of the University of Cam- 
bridge, of the other part. Whereas, in order to give encourage- 
ment to learning, and to assist Clergymen of the Church of 
England in sending their sons to the University, whose circum- 
stances and situations are altogether such as not to enable them 
to bear the whole of that expense, as well as to assist orphans of 
Clergymen under similar circumstances in obtaining the benefit 
of an University education, the said William Bell hath trans- 
ferred the sum of fifteen thousand two hundred pounds three 
per cent, consolidated Bank annuities, in the books of the 
Governor and Company of the Bank of England, to the Chan- 
cellor, Masters and Scholars of the University of Cambridge. 

Now it is hereby declared and agreed by and between the 
said parties, and the said Chancellor, Masters and Scholars do 
hereby declare that they, the said Chancellor, Masters and 
Scholars, and their successors, will stand possessed of the said 
fifteen thousand two hundred pounds three per cent, con- 
solidated Bank annuities upon the several trusts and for the 
several ends, intents and purposes hereinafter expressed, that is 
to say, 



136 

1. Upon trust that they the said Chancellor, Masters and 
Scholars, and their successors, shall receive the dividends arising 
on the said Bank annuities as they shall become due, and apply 
them to the purposes herein appointed, that is to say, 

2. The said trustees shall cause to be elected from among 
the undergraduates of the said University eight persons; 
namely, two of the third year, two of the second year, and four 
of the first year of standing, who shall be sons of Clergymen of 
the Church of England, circumstanced as is above described, 
or orphans of Clergymen similarly circumstanced, to be scholars 
upon this foundation, and they shall be elected at the following 
times, and under the following limitations. 

1810. The first election shall take place between the twelfth 
day of November and the twenty-fifth day of December in this 
present year one thousand eight hundred and ten, when there 
shall be elected two Scholars of the third year, that is, in their 
third year of standing, who were admitted between the com- 
mencements of one thousand eight hundred and seven and one 
thousand eight hundred and eight, and the profits of their 
scholarships shall commence from the sixth day of July in this 
present year one thousand eight hundred and ten, and be con- 
tinued for two years, that is, to the sixth day of July one 
thousand eight hundred and twelve, when these scholars will 
have become complete Bachelors of Arts ; and at the same time 
there shall likewise be elected two other scholars, called scholars 
of the second year, who were admitted between the commence- 
ments of one thousand eight hundred and eight and one thousand 
eight hundred and nine, and the j>rofits of their scholarships 
shall commence also from the sixth of July in this present year 
one thousand eight hundred and ten, and be continued for three 
years, that is, to the sixth of July one thousand eight hundred 
and thirteen, when these scholars likewise will have become 
complete Bachelors of Arts. 

1811. The second election shall take place on the Friday 
after Midlent Sunday, one thousand eight hundred and eleven, 
when there shall be elected two other scholars, called scholars 
of the first year, who were admitted between the commence- 
ments of one thousand eight hundred and nine and one thousand 
eight hundred and ten, and the profits of their scholarships 



337 

shall commence also from the sixth day of July of the present 
year one thousand eight hundred and ten, and be continued for 
four years, that is, to the sixth of July one thousand eight 
hundred and fourteen, when these scholars likewise will have 
become complete Bachelors of Arts. 

1812. The third election shall take place on the Friday 
after Midlent Sunday one thousand eight hundred and twelve, 
when there shall be elected two other scholars of the first year, 
who were admitted between the commencements of one thousand 
eight hundred and ten and one thousand eight hundred and 
eleven, and the profits of their scholarships shall commence from 
the sixth of July one thousand eight hundred and eleven, and be 
continued for four years, that is, to the sixth of July one thou- 
sand eight hundred and fifteen, when these scholars likewise will 
have become complete Bachelors of Arts. 

1813. The fourth election shall take place on the Friday 
after Midlent Sunday, one thousand eight hundred and thirteen, 
when there shall be elected two other scholars of the first year 
to succeed the two scholars of the third year, who were two of the 
four scholars first chosen, according to the same plan, and under 
the same conditions as before ; and in like manner, two scholars 
of the first year shall be elected on the Friday after Midlent 
Sunday in every year after for ever, to succeed the two scholara 
whose profits shall have ceased on the sixth day of July 
preceding. 

3. It is the particular request of the said William Bell, 
that the yice-Chancellor, the Regius Professor of Divinity, the 
Regius Professor of Civil Law, the Lucasian Professor of 
Mathematics, and the Public Orator will take the trouble of 
electing the said scholars in such manner as they shall determine 
upon. And in case of the absence or illness of either of the 
said electors, it is the request of the said William Bell that a 
deputy may be chosen by a Grace of the Senate. And if it 
shall at any time happen that two of the said offices constituting 
an elector shall be held by one and the same person, it is also 
the request of the said William Bell that a substitute for the 
elector in respect of the office last coming to him may be also 
appointed by a Grace of the Senate. 

4. The said scholars shall not be elected from King'^s College 



138 

or from Trinity Hall, but from every other college in the 
University without favour or partiality to any college. 

5. No person shall ever have two sons scholars, nor shall 
there be two orphan brothers scholars upon this foundation at 
one and the same time. 

6. Every scholar elected on this foundation shall promise 
to take the degree of Bachelor of Arts in the most regular 
manner by performing the exercises, and undergoing the ex- 
aminations appointed by the University for that purpose, which 
promise shall be written in a book and signed by him. 

7. As it is the special object of this foundation, upon a 
strict attention to which its real utility will ultimately depend, 
to assist such Clergymen, and such only, as well as such orphans, 
and such only, as really stand in need of assistance, the said 
electors shall carefully make inquiry into the situation and 
circumstances of all those undergraduates who may be desirous 
of obtaining these scholarships, and shall not permit any one to 
sit as a candidate for them who is manifestly well able to bear 
his own expenses, and of such as they shall judge it proper to 
admit to sit as candidates, they shall prefer those, when personal 
merits are equal, who they are conscientiously convinced, all 
circumstances considered, stand most in need of assistance. 
*' In his eligendis praecipua ratio semper habeatur ingenii, 
doctrinae, virtutis, et inopiae ; ut quo magis quisque ex eligendo- 
rum numero his rebus caeteros antecellat, eo magis, ut aequum 
est, praeferatur.**' 

8. The above-named trustees shall empower the same bank- 
ing firm in London to receive the dividends arising on the said 
Bank annuities as they empower to receive the dividends on 
the other stock belonging to the University. And they shall 
make half-yearly payments to the respective college tutors of 
the said scholars for the use of the scholars themselves in the 
following manner, that is to say, 

9. That so long as the property-tax continues to be levied 
at the rate of 10 per cent , and the clear annual income arising 
from the said stock is no more than four hundred and ten 
pounds and eight shillings, they shall pay the sum of fifty 
pounds in each year to each of the said scholars, reserving in 
their hands annually the sum of ten pounds and eight shillings ; 



139 

and when the property-tax shall be either lessened, or suspended, 
or increased, they shall divide the whole clear income arising 
from the said stock equally between the said scholars, except 
only reserving always the sum of ten pounds. And the said 
sum of ten pounds so reserved shall be applied to the purpose 
of defraying the expense of a dinner for the electors, which 
dinner shall be had either on the day of the annual election of 
the scholars, or on such other day very shortly after it as the 
electors shall appoint. And the eight shillings which at the 
present rate of the property-tax will remain, shall be applied to 
whatever purpose the electors shall approve. 

10. And because, by the regulations already appointed 
in Article second for the three first elections, there will be 
only six scholars elected in time to receive the profits arising 
in the year beginning from the sixth of July one thousand 
eight hundred and ten, and ending on the sixth of July one 
thousand eight hundred and eleven, and thus one hundred pounds 
of the dividends arising from the Foundation-stock for that year 
will remain unappropriated, the said electors shall divide that 
hundred pounds in equal shares of twenty-five pounds each 
between four sons or orphans of Clergymen qualified as above 
described, who are not elected scholars on this foundation, and 
whom the electors shall judge to be, all circumstances con- 
sidered, the most deserving of the said gift agreeably to the 
principles of this foundation. 

11. It is the particular request of the said William Bell 
that the electors of the scholars may be appointed auditors of 
the accounts of this institution. 

12. If it shall happen that any scholar elected on this 
foundation shall die while he is only in his third year of stand- 
ing or sooner, the said electors shall as soon as may be proceed 
to elect another scholar qualified as already described, of the 
same year in standing with the deceased, who shall enjoy the 
profits of his scholarship as long as the deceased scholar would 
have enjoyed them. But if any scholar should happen to die 
when only one half-yearly payment from his scholarship remains 
unpaid to him, that payment shall be made to the coUege tutor 
of the deceased scholar for the payment of any debts he may 
have left, or for the use of his father or family. 



140 

13. If it shall happen that any scholar elected on this 
foundation shall degrade, or determine to go out in what is 
called a bye-term, or declare for law, or be rusticated or 
expelled, his scholarship shall be ipso facto vacant immediately 
upon such degrading, determining to go out in a bye-term, 
declaring for law, rustication or expulsion, and any payment 
from his scholarship which may be actually due to him at the 
time of such degrading, determining to go out in a bye-term, 
declaring for law, rustication or expulsion, shall be forfeited and 
divided equally among the other scholars, and if such vacating 
of a scholarship shall take place either in the third year of 
standing of the vacating scholar, or sooner, the electors shall as 
soon as may be elect another scholar qualified as above required, 
and of the same standing with the farmer, who shall enjoy the 
profits of his scholarship for the same period as the vacating 
scholar would have enjoyed them; but if such vacancy shall 
take place when only one half-yearly payment from his scholar- 
ship remains unpaid to the vacating scholar, that payment 
shall be divided equally among the other scholars. 

14. In case it shall at any time happen that no sons or 
orphans of Clergymen circumstanced as this foundation requires 
shall be found desirous of being elected to these scholarships, 
or if any son or orphan of a clergyman admitted to sit as a 
candidate for them shall be deemed by the electors unfit to be 
elected, and no other son or orphan of a Clergyman qualified as 
above required shall be found to fill the vacancy, then, and in 
these cases only, the electors shall elect sons of laymen, being 
undergraduates who stand in need of assistance, not sons of 
Clergymen who are well able to bear their own expenses. 

15. If the electors shall deem it expedient to print copies 
of, or extracts from this Foundation- Deed, to be given to the 
heads and tutors of the several colleges from which the scholars 
are to be elected, as well as to the scholars themselves, they 
are hereby authorised to pay the expense occasioned by it 
by an equal deduction from the next half-yearly payment to the 
scholars. • 

16. When the electors meet to elect the scholars, the 
business shall always be entered upon by having this Foundation- 
Deed read aloud by one of the electors to the rest. 



141 

In witness whereof the said William Bell hath hereunto 
' set his hand and seal, and the said Chancellor, Master and 

Scholars their corporate seal, the day and year first above 
written. 

To be read after the Foundation- Deed, Seventh Clause repealed. 

Whereas, by the seventh clause in the within written 
Foundation Deed, it is agreed and ordered that the electors 
to the Scholarships by the same Indenture founded shall not 
permit any one to sit as a candidate for them, who is manifestly 
well able to bear his own expenses : Now it is hereby agreed 
and ordered, that the said limitation shall from henceforth be 
repealed, and that sons and orphans of Clergymen shall be 
allowed to sit as candidates for the said scholarships, without 

I any objection being made to them on account of their pecuniary 

circumstances. But that in electing the scholars from among 
the candidates, the electors shall govern themselves con- 
scientiously by the following rule, so that the different circum- 

j stances of the candidates, as well as their merits, shall be 

I allowed their due weight and influence in the choice. — Rule. 

tf ^Mn his eligendis praecipua ratio semper habeatur ingenii, 

doctrinae, virtutis et inopiae ; ut quo magis quisque ex eligen- 
dorum numero his rebus antecellat, eo magis, ut aequum est, 
praeferatur." And whereas, in the said Foundation-Deed it is 
directed that whenever the electors meet to elect the scholars, 
the business shall be entered upon by having the Foundation- 
Deed read aloud by one of the electors to the rest : Now it is 
hereby directed that as often as the said Foundation- Deed is 
so read, this endorsement shall be read in the same manner 
immediately after it. 

In witness whereof the said William Bell hath hereunto 
set his hand and seal, and the said Chancellor, Masters and 
Scholars their corporate seal, the twenty-ninth day of January, 
in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and twelve. 

(Signed) Wm, Bell. 



( 



142 



f 



VI, The Pitt Scholarship. 

The following letter was read by the Vioe-Chancellor to the 
Senate, April 8, 1813: — 

To the Right Worshipful the Vice-Chancellor of the University 

of Cambridge, 

Sir, 
The Committee for managing the subscription for Mr. Pitt's 
Statue beg leave to offer to the University of Cambridge the 
sum of one thousand pounds to found a scholarship, to be 
entitled ^^ The Pitt Scholarship/^ on the same general plan as 
those founded by Lord Craven. 

Signed by order of the Committee, 

J. Brown, Secretary. 

The following Grace was then read to the Senate and passed on 

the next day, April 9, 1813; — 

Cum ex literis modo lectis pateat summam mille librarum 
oblatam esse Academiae in fundationem exhibitionis cujusdam 
cui nomen anglice " Pitt Scholarship;" Placeat vobis ut haec 
pecunia grate accipiatur; utque Dominus Pro-Cancellarius, Dr. 
Milner, Dr. Jowett, Mr. J. Wood Coll : Joh : Mr. Chapman 
Coll : Cai : Mr. J. Brown Coll : Trin : et Mr. Turton Coll : 
Cath : sint Syndici vestri qui consulant et ad Senatum referant 
quid potissimum in hac re faciendum esse videatur. 

The following Grace was passed by the Senate, May 19, 1813: — 

Cum societas quaedam cui nomen Anglice '^ The Pitt Club," 
summam quingentarum librarum Academiae obtulerit ; Placeat 
vobis ut haec pecunia accipiatur, utque Orator Publicus eidem 
societati nomine Academiae gratias referat, utque Dominus Pro- 
Cancellarius, Dr. Milner, Dr. Jowett, Mr. J. Wood, Mr. Chap- 
man, Mr. J. Brown et Mr. Turton, Syndici qui fundationem 
exhibitionis cujusdam curarent 9°^ die Aprilis constituti, hao 
etiam in parte Syndici vestri constituantur. 



143 

The following Rules were approved by the Senate, Dec. 9, 1813, 
on the recommendation of the Syndicate: — 
1, The sum of £1,000 given by the Subscribbrs to Mr. Prrr's 
Statue for the purpose of founding the Pitt Scholarship, and 
which has since been augmented by a donation of <j^500 from 
the Pitt Club in London, shall be placed in the public funds, 
until the Syndics shall be able to vest it in land; and the 
clear annual income arising from it shall be paid to the Pitt 
Scholar. 

2. The Vice-Chancellor or his deputy, the Public Orator, 
the Greek Professor, and two members of the Senate, to be 
appointed by the different colleges in their turn, shall be the 
electors. Two colleges, according to the cycle of Proctors com- 
mencing with the year 1817, shall respectively nominate an 
elector. But if the Vice-Chancellor, the Public Orator, and 
the Greek Professor, or any two of them, be members of the 
same college, no elector in that case shall be appointed by the 
college according to the cycle of Proctors, but the appointment 
shall be made by the University. Or if the Public Orator or 
the Greek Professor shall be prevented by illness or otherwise 
from attending the examination, or if the colleges shall have 
neglected to signify to the Vice-Chancellor the appointment of 
the electors according to their respective turns, then Deputies 
shall be appointed by Grace. 

3. The first examination shall commence on Monday, Janu- 
ary 17,1814; and the Vice-Chancellor or his deputy, the Public 
Orator, and the Greek Professor, shall, in future, on or before 
the first day of December after every vacancy, cause a writing 
under their hands, declaring the said vacancy and the time of 
examination, to be affixed to the door of the Public Schools; 
and they shall notify the same to the two colleges, which are to 
nominate the electors, and the Heads of those colleges, or their 
deputies, shall, within one week after such notices, signify to the 
Vice-Chancellor the names of the electors so appointed. 

4. The examination, which shall be solely classical, shall 
always take place during the week of the public examinations in 
the Senate-House, previous to the Bachelors' Commencement, 
and the scholar elected shall receive all the dividends or rents 
that shall have become due subsequent to the last vacancy. 



144 

5. Any undergraduate, of whatever rank, may be a can- 
didate for the Pitt Scholarship, provided he be not of more 
than three years* standing from the time of his first residence; 
but he shall, on or before the Sist day of December preceding 
the examination, signify, in a Latin epistle to each of the 
electors, his intention of becoming a candidate, and in case he 
shall omit sending such an epistle, he shall be considered as 
incapable of being elected at that time. 

6. The Pitt Scholar shall not hold any other University 
scholarship. 

7. Every scholar shall, during the time of his holding this 
scholarship, reside the major part of every term ; and if he shall 
not have kept such residence, he shall vacate his scholarship, 
unless he has been prevented by illness or any other cause which 
shall be approved of by the Vice-chancellor, the Public Orator, 
and the Greek Professor. 

8. Every scholar who shall obtain any ecclesiastical bene- 
fice or preferment, or shall be Master of Arts standing, shall 
vacate his scholarship. 



145 



VII. Mr. Ttrwhitt's Benefaction. 

The following Grace was passed by the Senate, Dec. 3, 1817. 

Cum venerabilis vir Robertus Tyrwhitt quatuor millia Li- 
brarum ad studium literarum Hebraicarum promovendum 
Acaderaiae testamento legaverit; Placeat vobis ut Dominus 
Pro-Cancellarius, Dr. Kaye, Mr. Tatham, Mr. Palmer, Mr. 
Gimingham, Mr. Renouard Coll : Sid : et Mr. R. Ward 
Coll : Trin : Syndic! constituantur vestri, qui consulant quo 
potissimum modo et quibus ordinationibus institutum adeo 
laudabile perficiatur et quid iis visum fuerit ad vos intra tres 
menses referant. 

The Syndics recommended, February 18, 1818, the founda- 
tion of three scholarships, to be called "Tyrwhitt's Hebrew 
Scholarships,**^ together with certain regulations to continue in 
force for six years. Their recommendations were adopted by 
the Senate, April 8, 1815. 

The number of scholarships was increased to six, and new 
regulations were made by Grace of the Senate, March 14, 1826. 

The regulations have been altered by the Senate on several 
subsequent occasions, on the recommendation of Syndics ap- 
pointed for the purpose. 



146 



VIII, The Crosse Scholarships. 

Abstract of Deed of Declaration of trust approved hy the Court of 
Chancery in the cause^ Browne v. the Attorney- General^ 
August \Al, 1833. 

The Indenture, made Aug. 14, 1833, between George Buxton 
Browne, Esq., of Saville Row, Halifax, sole executor of the 
last will and testament of the Rev. John Crosse, late Vicar of 
Bradford, of the one part, and the Chancellor, Masters and 
Scholars of the University, of the other part, recites that the 
said John Crosse duly made and published his last will and 
testament in writing, bearing date June 15, 1816, and thereby, 
after, leaving various legacies, gave and bequeathed the re- 
mainder of his personal property of what kind or nature soever 
unto the said George Buxton Browne, earnestly requesting 
and entreating him to expend the same in furthering and 
promoting the cause of true religion among the inhabitants 
of Great Britain and Ireland as to him might appear most 
eligible. 

The Indenture recites also divers proceedings in the 
Court of Chancery respecting the application of the estate of 
the testator. 

It is then declared and agreed that there shall be estab- 
lished for ever in the University of Cambridge three theological 
scholarships, to be called " The Crosse Scholarships ; " and that 
the candidates for the same shall respectively be of such degree 
and standing, and shall be elected at such period of the year, 
and by such persons, and under such regulations, as are declared 
and contained by and in the Regulations approved and adopted 
by the Senate of the University on Dec. 4, 1882, 

It is further declared and agreed that when and so soon as 
the examination and election of the three scholars to fill up the 



147 

three Boholarships shall have taken place in the Michaehnas 
term next ensuing the date of the indenture, the Chancellor^ 
Masters and Scholars shall pay and divide the dividends, which 
shall then have accrued upo|^ the stock transferred to them, 
unto and equally between such three scholars in equal shares and 
proportions for their respective use and benefit absolutely : 
and also that the said Chancellor, Masters and Scholars shall, 
in each and every succeeding year immediately after the annual 
examination and election directed to take place in the Michael- 
mas term, pay and divide the dividends which shall then have 
accrued, due upon the said stock since the last previous annual 
examination and election, unto and equally between the three 
scholars who shall then hold and enjoy the said three scholar- 
ships in equal shares and proportions for their respective use 
and benefit absolutely. 

The following are the Regulations mentioned in the Deed, as 
having been approved and adopted by the Senate on Dec. 4, 
1832. 

1. That they be called ^* The Crossb Scholabships." 

2. That the Candidates for the same be Bachelors of Arts 
in the first year from their degree ; and that such scholarships 
be tenable till the scholars attain the standing of Masters of 
Arts, viz. for three years. 

3. That the first elections be so an*anged as to make one 
of them vacant yearly for ever ; and for this purpose, that at 
the first election the persons elected be a junior, a middle and 
a senior Bachelor. 

4. That the annual examination and election take place 
in the Michaelmas term after the division of the said term. 

6. That in case of any vacancy of a scholarship before 
the person is of Master of Arts^ standing, at the next annual 
election a Bachelor of Arts of the same year with the scholar 
BO vacating be elected into his room. 

6. That the sum of ^2000 proposed to be' transferred to 
the University be vested in Oovemment securities, in the name 
of the Chancellor, Masters and Scholars, the annual interest 
arising from the same to be divided equally among the three 
scholars. 

VOL. II. D 



148 

7« The eloctoTs to be tlie Yiee-Chanoellor, the MsrgM^t 
ProfeoRnr of Divmity, the Regius Professor of Divinity^ the- 
Begins Professor of Hebrew^ the Regius Professor of Greek, 
the Norrisian Professor of Divinity, and the Professor of 
Arabic. 

8. The examination to turn upon a knowledge of the 
Holy Scriptures in their original tongues, Hebrew and Greek, 
of ecclesiastical history, of the earlier and later heresies, and 
such other subjects of useful inquiry as may be thought most 
Ukely to assist in the formation of valuable diaraeters, fitted to 
sustain and adorn ** the cause of true religion.'^ 



149 



IX. The Porson Scholarship, 

Thb Indentare, made January 27, 1848, betwe^i John 
CSiapman, Esq. and Samuel Metcalfe Latham, Esq., executor* 
of the Rev. John Cleaver Banks, deceased, of the first part, the 
Bev. Charles Parr Burney, D.D., sole administrator of the 
goods of the Rev. Charles Burney, D.D. deceased, of the second 
part, and the Chancellor, Masters and Scholars of the Univer- 
sity, of the third part, recites that in the lifetime of the late 
learned Richard Porson, Professor of Greek in the University of 
Cambridge, divers individuals, desirous of doing honour to his 
attainments, raised by subscription among themselves a sum of 
money, which was intended to be wholly applied for his benefit^ 
and the application thereof was committed to several trustees, 
of whom the Rev. Charles Burney and the Rev. John Cleaver 
Bauk& were the survivors; that the interest only of the said 
fund was received by the said Richard Porson during his life ; 
and, the principal being undisposed of at his death, it was deter- 
mined by the original subscribers, assembled by public adver* 
tisement, that the same should be applied to such purposes as 
the then trustees themselves should choose ; that, parts of the 
said fund having been disposed of in various ways, it was always 
the intention of the said trustees that the residue should, when 
and so soon as the same should accumulate to a sum sufficient 
for that purpose, be applied in founding a scholarship in the 
said University, to be called *• The Porson Scholarship ;" that 
the said residue, now amounting together with interest to the 
sum of £1,7S2, 18^. 4d,, had been laid out in the purchase of 
the sum of £1,941. 12s, lOd. three per cent. Consolidated Bank 
annuities in the names of the Chancellor, Masters and Scholars 
of the University. 

It is then declared and agreed that the yearly proceeds of 
the said Bank annuities iVom time to time, when and as they 
shall be receivable, and also of the accumulations thereof, shall 
be laid out in the purchase of the like Bank annuities, in order 
that the same may accumulate at compound interest for forming 

d2 



150 

a fund for establishing and founding in the University a scholar- 
ship to be called '^The Person Scholarship;^^ and when and as 
soon as the said fund shall by accumulation or otherwise have 
amounted to such a sum as will produce the yearly income of 
sixty-five pounds, then the Chancellor, Masters and Scholars 
shall pay the annual proceeds of the said fund, or a competent 
part thereof at their discretion, unto the person who for the 
time being shall be elected into the Person Scholarship, so that 
such scholar and his successors shall receive an exhibition of not 
less than sixty pounds per annum; and shall permit the residue 
or surplus of the said annual proceeds and also the arrears of 
stipend, which may at any time accrue during the vacancy of 
the said scholarship, to accumulate for the general purposes of 
the said trust; that, as soon as conveniently may be after the 
expiration of six calendar months from the period at which the 
yearly income arising from the said fund shall have amounted 
to the sum of sixty-five pounds, the said Chancellor, Masters 
and Scholars shall proceed to the election of a fit and proper 
person, according to the regulations hereinafter contained, to 
hold the Porson Scholarship ; and that a fit and proper person 
shall in like manner be elected from time to time, when and as 
often as any vacancy shall occur therein ; that the election to 
the said scholarship shall be made in the manner hereinafter 
mentioned, and the same shall be held subject to the rules and 
regulations hereinafter contained, viz. — 

1. That any undergraduate shall be eligible to the said 
scholarship, who shall have been matriculated, and shall not 
have resided in the University more than five terms. 

2. That on or before the 1st day of December next after 
the occurrence of any vacancy, public notice shall be given 
declaring the said vacancy and the time of examination ; and 
that every candidate shall signify his intention of presenting 
himself for examination in a Latin epistle to each of the electors 
on or before the 31st day of December. 

3. That the electors shall be the Yice-Chancellor, the 
Provost of King's College, the Master of Trinity College, the 
Master of St Johns's College, the Master of Christ's College, 
the Master of Caius College, the Public Orator, and the Greek 
Professor. 



151 

4. That the examination shall be exclusively classical, and 
shall commence in the last week of January, at the same time 
as the examination of the candidates for the other University 
Scholarships. 

5. That the Porson Scholar shall reside during the major 
part of every term, unless prevented by sickness or other cause 
to be approved of by the Vice-chancellor and a majority of the 
other electors. 

6. That the Porson Scholar shall not hold any other 
University Scholarship; and that he shall vacate his scholar- 
ship at the expiration of three years and a half from the Christ- 
mas-day preceding his election, so as to be entitled to seven 
half-yearly payments. 



152 



PillZJBS OF THE UNIVERSITY. 



I. The Sbatonian Prize. 



A Clause of Mr. SeatorCs Will, dated Ocioler 8, 1738. 

I oiVE my Kislingbury estate to the University of Cambridge 
for ever : the rents of which shall be disposed of yearly by the 
Vice-Chancellor for the time being, as he the Vice-Chancellor, 
the Master of Clare Hall, and the Greek Professor for the time 
being, or any two of them, shall agree. Which three persons 
aforesaid shall give out a subject, which subject shall for the first 
year be one or other of the Perfections or Attributes of the 
Supreme Being, and so the succeeding years till that subject is 
exhausted; and afterwards the subject shall be either Death, 
Judgment, Heaven, Hell, Purity of Heart, &c. or whatever else 
may be judged by the Vice-Chancellor, Master of Clare Hall, 
and Greek Professor, to be most conducive to the honour of the 
Supreme Being and recommendation of virtue. And they shall 
yearly dispose of the rent of the above estate to that Master of 
Arts whose poem on the subject given shall be best approved 
by them. Which poem I ordain to be always in English, and 
to be printed ; the expense of which shall be deducted out of 
the product of the estate, and the residue given as a reward 
for the composer of the poem, or ode, or copy of verses ; and 
the reason of my thus ordaining it is, the language being change- 



[ 



153 

able, and words growing obsolete, that the great Ood may ever 
have his attributes and perfections celebrated and extolled in a 
style perfectly adapted to the taste and understanding of every 
succeeding generation, and that virtue may be represented also 
to the world id the most amiable view. 



II. Db. SmrrH^s Prizes. — (See Plumun Professobship.) 



III. Sir William Brownr's Medals. — (See page ISO.) 



IV. The Norrisian Prize. — (See Foundations of Mr. 

NORRIS.) 



y. Thc Hulsbaii Prize. — (See Mr. Hvum'^ Founda. 

TICKS.) 



151 



VI. The Poribon University Prizb. 

The Indenture made November 27, 1816, between the Rev. 
Charles Bumey, D. D. and the Rev. John Cleaver Banks, M.A. 
of the one part, and the Chancellor, Masters and Scholars of 
the University of the other part, recites that in the life-time of 
the late learned Richard Person, Professor of Oreek in the 
University of Cambridge, divers individuals, desirous of doing 
honour to his attainments, raised by subscription among them- 
selves a sum of money, which was intended to be wholly applied 
for his benefit, and the application thereof was conunitted to 
several trustees, of whom the said Charles Bumey and John 
Cleaver Banks are the only survivors ; that the interest only 
of the said fund was received by the said Richard Person during 
his life ; and, the principal being undisposed of at his death, it 
was determined by the original subscribers, assembled by public 
advertisement, that the same should be applied to such purposes 
as the trustees themselves should choose : that, in pursuance of 
this determination, after various dispositions of parts of the said 
fund, the said Charles Bumey and John Cleaver Banks had 
proposed to the Chancellor, Masters and Scholars to transfer 
into their names in the public funds so much capital stock as 
would produce the yearly sum of twenty pounds, for the founda- 
tion of an annual prize, to be called the Person University 
Prize; and the said Chancellor, Masters and Scholars having 
agreed to accept the said stock upon trust to apply the same to 
the purpose proposed, the said Charles Bumey and John Cleaver 
Banks had transfeiTed into the names of the said Chancellor, 
Masters and Scholars the capital sum of four hundred pounds 
Navy five per cent, annuities. 

It is then declared and agreed that the dividends of the 
said stock shall be for ever yearly and every year laid out and 
expended in the purchase of one or more Greek book or books, 
to be chosen by the Vice-Chancellor of the University for the 
time being or his lawful deputy, which book or books shall 



155 

yearly, at the commencement, be given as a prize for Oreek 
verse by the name of "The Porson University Prize/' according 
to the following rules and regulations. 

The verses shall be a translation of a passage or passages in 
some play of Shakspeare or of Ben Jonson or of Massinger or of 
Beaumont and Fletcher, selected by the Vice-chancellor or his 
deputy, and announced or published a reasonable time before 
the commencement. The metre of the translation, if the selec- 
tion be from a Tragedy, shall be Troffieum lambicum Trimetrum 
Acatalectkwm or Tragieum Troehaicum Tetrametrum Cataleeti- 
cum ; if from a Comedy, the metre of the translation shall be 
Comicum lamlicwm Trimetrum Aeatahctieum or Comicum Tro- 
^Aaieum Tetrametrum Cataleeticum or Comicum Anapwstumm 
Tetrametrum Cataleeticum. All undergraduates in the Uni- 
vermty may be candidates, but they must send their translations 
distinctly written and accentuated, and accompanied by literal 
Latin prose versions of the Greek, to the Vice-Chancellor's 
Lodge, on or before the day appointed by him or his deputy for 
that purpose. The examiners shall be the Vice-Chancellor or 
his deputy, the Provost of King^s, the Master of Trinity College, 
the Master of St. John's College, the Master of Christ's College, 
the Master of Cains College, the Public Orator and the Greek 
Professor, or such of them as can attend ; and the prize shall 
be given to the author of the translation which the examiners 
or a majority of them shall adjudge the best (and the Vice- 
Chancellor or his deputy shall have a casting vote if necessary), 
on condition that such prize translation be printed, and copies 
given to the Chancellor, the Vice-Chancellor, and the heads of 
houses, by the successful candidate previous to the commence- 
ment, and that the same be recited by the author in the Senate- 
House at the commencement. The plan adopted in the case of 
Sir William Browne's Prizes shall be followed as far as relates 
to ascertaining the author of the prize translation, without 
disclosure of the names of the other candidates. The prize 
translation shall be transcribed into a folio book to be kept by 
the Vice-Chancellor for the time being, and not to go out of his 
custody except annually, for the purpose of receiving transcripts 
of prize verses, or of being produced in the Senate-House. 
If in any year no worthy candidate shall appear, the book or 



156 

l>ook«i provide for that year shall he reserved, and given to the 
^candidate whose translation shall be adjudged by the examiners 
to be the second best^ or next in merit to the prize translation, 
«and worthy to be rewarded, in the next subsequent year ; and 
80 from time to time the book or books provided for any year, 
And not given in that year as a prize, shall be reserved till the 
examiners shall adjudge the same to be given^ in some subse- 
quent year, to a candidate whose translation shall be second 
best or third best to the prize translation, bat worthy to be 
rewarded, and then shall be disposed of accordingly ; provided 
that every candidate, whose translation is second best or third 
best, to whom such reward shall be adjudged, shall be subject 
to the like condition of printing at his expense and distributing, 
and reciting his translation as the author of the prize transla- 
tion ; and every such second best or third best trandation shall 
be transcribed into the same book as the prize translation of 
the year in which it shall be produced. 

Memorandum. — If in any year the whole sum of twenty 
pounds shall not happen to be expended in the prize book or 
books, the sui*plus shall be given to the same candidate as shall 
obtain the book or books as a prize or reward for his trauoslation. 



167 



VIL Sir Piebeobinb Maitland*! Prizb. 

Thb friendA of Lieutenant-Qieneral Sir Peregrine MaitlaAd, 
E.C.B., late Commander in Chief of the forces in South India, 
being desirous of testifjring their respect and esteem for his 
character and principles, and for his disinterested zeal in the 
cause of Christian truth in the East, raised a fund for the 
institution of a prize in one of the Universities, and for other 
purposes, such prize to be associated with the name of Sir 
Peregrine Maitland. 

In pursuance of the foregoing scheme, the sum of <f 1000 
was given to the University of Cambridge in 1 844, for the pur- 
pose of instituting a prize, to be called ^* Sir Peregrine Mait- 
land's Prize,^' for an English essay on some subject connected 
with the Propagation of the Gospel, through missionary exertions, 
in India and other parts of the heathen world. It was sug- 
gested : — 

1. That the prize should be given once in every three 
years, and should consist of the accruing interest of the principal 
sum during the preceding three years. 

2. That the subject should be given out in the Michaelmas 
term by the Vice-chancellor, and the exercises sent in before 
the division of the Easter term. 

3. That the candidates for the prize, at the time when 
the subject is given out, be Bachelors of Arts under the stand- 
ing of M.A. ; or students in Civil Law or Medicine, of not less 
than four, or more than seven years' standing, not being gra- 
duates in either faculty, who shall be required, before they are 
admitted to become candidates, to produce from their respective 
Professors certificates that they have kept the exercises neces- 
sary for the Degree of Bachelor of Law or Medicine. 

4. That the examiners for the prize should be the Vice- 
Chancellor and two other members of the University, either 
Masters of Arts, or of degrees superior to the degree of Master 
of Arts, to be nominated by the Vice-Chancellor and approved 



i 



158 



I by the Senate, and that their names should be announced 

together with the subject of the essay. 

5. That the essay be printed at the expense of the suc- 
cessful candidate; and that fifty copies be distributed to each 
of the three following institutions : — The Society for the Pro- 
pfligation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts ; the Church Missionary 
Society ; Bishop Corrie's Grammar School at Madras. 

r 

I 

ft 



159 



VIII. The Burnet Prize. 

The Indenture, made January 19, 1847, between Jane 
Caroline Bumey, of Cunningham Place, St JoWs Wood, in the 
County of Middlesex, spinster, of the one part, and the Chan- 
cellor, Masters and Scholars of the University of Cambridge of 
the other part, recites that Richard Bumey, Esq., late of Cun-^ 
ningham Place aforesaid, invested in his life-time a certain sum 
of cash in the purchase of £S500, 3 per cent. Reduced Bank 
annuities, in the names of himself and the said Jane Caroline 
Bumey, with the intention that she should transfer the said 
Bank annuities to the Chancellor, Masters and Scholars for the 
purpose of founding a certain prize ; and that, after the death 
of the said Richard Bumey, she, the said Jane Caroline Bumey, 
had transferred the said sum, together with certain other 
sums in the said Bank annuities, amounting in the whole to 
£8720. Ss. lOd. into the names of the said Chancellor, Masters 
and Scholars. 

It is then declared and agreed that the Chancellor, Masters 
and Scholars shall pay and apply the annual proceeds of the 
said fund in the following manner, viz. — 

1. That a prize, to be called the Bumey Prize, shall be 
established in the University for the best English Essay on some 
moral or metaphysical subject, on the existence, nature and 
attributes of God, or on the tmth and evidence of the Christian 
religion. 

2. That the prize shall be an annual one of a sum not 
exceeding £105, to be paid out of one yearns dividends of the 
said sum of £3720. Ss. lOd. 

3. That the balance of the said one yearns dividends, as 
also any dividends or other monies, which may from any circum- 
stance be in the hands of the Chancellor, Masters and Scholars 
applicable to the prize, shall from time to time be invested in 
their names and added to the said tmst fund ; out of which 
said additions any incidental expense connected with the trust 
shall be first paid, and the balance reserved in order to meet 
any exigency which may arise. 



160 

4. That the subject of such essay shall from year to year 
be chosen and set by the Vioe-Chancellor for the time being, 
and shall be announced and declared by faim on the day of 
admission of the questionists ad respondendum quoBstioni in 
each year, and public notice thereof given. 

5. That any Bachelor of Arts of the University of Cambridge 
shall be admissible to o<Miipete for the prize, who shall be in his 
first year of standing on the last day allowed for sending in the 
essays. 

6. That the examiners of the compositions and the adju* 
dicators of the prize shall be the Vice-Chancellor of the Univer* 
aty, the Master of Christ^s College and the Norrisian Professor 
of Divinity* 

7. That in the event of the essays of two of the candidates 
being deemed by the examiners to possess equal merits if one 
of such candidates shall be a member of Christ^s College,, the 
prize shall be adjudged to him ; but in no case shall the prize 
be divided between two or more candidates. 

8. That the candidates shall deliver their essaya in writing 
to the Vice-Chancellor on or before Nov. 12 in each year, and 
the prize be adjudged with all convenient dispatich. 

. 9. That the successful candidate shall cause his essay to 
be printed at his own expense, and deliver or cause to be 
delivered a copy thereof to the respective libraries of the Uni- 
versities of Cambridge, Oxford, Dublin and Edinburgh, to the 
library of Christ's College, Cambridge, and to the Vice-Chan- 
cellor, the Master of Christ's College, and the Norrisian Profesr 
sor of Divinity. 

10. That upon such copies being delivered as aforesaid^ the 
said sum, not exceeding £105, shall be paid to the snccessfnl 
candidate out of the dividends and interest accruing during the 
year in which the subject was announced. 



161 



IX. The Adams Prize. 

Several members of St John's College having raised by sub- 
seription a fund for the purpose of establishing a prize to be 
connected with the name of Mr. Adams, in testimony of their 
sense of the honour he has conferred on his College and the 
University by having been the first among the Mathematicians 
of Europe to determine from perturbations the unknown placa 
of a disturbing planet exterior to Uranus, offered the said fund, 
to the University for iU acceptance under the following regula- 
tions : — 

1. That a prize to be called *'The Adams Prize/* be 
awarded every two years, during the Michaeknas term, to the 
author of the best essay on some subject of pure Mathematics, 
Astronomy, or other branch of Natural Philosophy. 

2. That the Vice-Chancellor and the Plumian Professor of 
Astronomy and Experimental Philosophy be requested to under- 
take the office of examiners and adjudicators of the prize, in 
conjunction with two persons to be nominated by colleges in 
rotation, according to the cycle of Proctors, and to be approved 
by Grace of the Senate, provided always that not more than 
two of the examiners be members of the same college. 

3. That the Adams Prize be open to the competition of 
all persons who have at any time been admitted to a degree in 
this University. 

4. That the successful candidate receive two years' income 
of the fund, and in case no essay be considered deserving of 
the prize, the income of the past two years be added to the 
capital of the fund. 

5. That the first two examiners to be chosen by the 
Senate be elected at the second Congregation of the Lent term 
of 1849, and that the future examiners be in like manner 
elected every second year. 

6. That as soon as may be after the election of the said 
two examiners, or at least before the end of the Lent term in 
which they shall have been elected, the four examiners select 
and publicly announce the subject for the next essay, and that 



162 

the prize for the same be awarded in the Michaelmas term of 
the year next following. 

7. That the essays be sent in to the Yice-Chancellor on 
or before the first day of July preceding the Michaelmas term 
in which the prize is to be awarded, in the same manner and 
form as are prescribed in the regulations for the Chancellor's 
English Medal. 

8. That the essay be printed at the expense of the suc- 
cessful candidate, and a copy be presented to the University 
Library, to the Library of St John's College, and to each of the 
four examiners. 

9. That if at any time hereafter it appear to the Senate 
to be expedient to alter the foregoing scheme, it be competent 
to the Master and senior Fellows of St John'^s College, at the 
request of the Senate, to propose for its adoption an amended 
scheme. 

The proposal was accepted by Grace of the Senate, April 
7, 1848. 

The following alterations having been approved by the 
Master and senior Fellows of St John's College, were made in 
the scheme by Grace of the Senate, Feb. 23, 1853. 

In the sixth regulation to omit the words ^' and that the 
prize for the same be awarded in the Michaelmas term of the 
year next following.'' 

For the seventh regulation to substitute the following: 
" That the essays be sent to the Vice-Chancellor on or before 
the 16th day of December of the year next following that in 
which the subject is announced, in the same manner and form 
as are prescribed in the regulations for the Chancellor's English 
Medal; and that the prize be awarded before the division of 
the following Easter term.'' 



163 



X. The Le Bas Prize. 

A LARGE number of members of the civil service of India who 
were students at the East India College at Haileybury at various 
intervals during the thirty years that the Rev. G. W. Le Bas, 
M.A., formerly Fellow of Trinity College, was connected with 
that institution, desirous of testifying their regard for Mr. Le 
Bas, and of perpetuating the memory of his services, raised a 
fund amounting to about £1,920 three per cent, consols, which 
was offered to and accepted by the University in November, 
1848, for founding an annual Prize, to be called in honour of 
Mr. Le Bas, ** The Le Bas Prize," for the best English Essay 
on a subject of General Literature, such subject to be occasion- 
ally chosen with reference to the history, institutions, and pro- 
bable destinies and prospects of the Anglo-Indian empire. 
It was proposed : — 

1. That *' The Le Bas Prize^^ shall consist of the annual 
interest of the above-mentioned fund, the Essay being published 
at the expense of the successful candidate. 

2. That the candidates for the Prize shall be, at the time 
when the subject is given out, Bachelors of Arts under the 
standing of M.A. ; or students in civil law or medicine of not 
less than four or more than seven years* standing, not being 
graduates in either faculty, but having kept the exercises neces- 
sary for the degree of Bachelor of Law or Medicine. 

3. That the subject for the Essay shall be selected and 
the Prize adjudicated by the Vice-Chancellor and two other 
members of the Senate, to be nominated by the Vice-Chancellor 
and approved by the Senate at the first Congregation after the 
tenth day of October in each year. 

4. That the subject shall be given out in the week pre- 
ceding the division of the Michaelmas Term in each year, and 
the Essays sent in before the end of the next ensuing Easter 
Term. 



VOL. II. K 



164 



XL Thb Carus Greek Testament Prizes. 

Several friends of the Rev. William Carus, M.A., late senior 
Fellow of Trinity College, desirous of testifying their regard to 
Mr. Carus, raised a fund amounting to £500. 3 per cent, consols, 
which they offered to the University for the purpose of founding 
a yearly Prize or Prizes for the encouragement of the accurate 
study of the Greek Testament. 

Mr. Carus subsequently offered to the University the sum of 
£500. 8 per cent consols to augment the said Fund. 

The offers were accepted by the Senate on February 2, 
1853, and May 25, 1853, respectively. 

A Syndicate was appointed by Grace on February 2, 1853, 
to draw up a scheme of regulations for the institution of the 
Prize; and their recommendations were adopted by Grace, 
May 25, 1853, as follows :-^ 

1. That there shall be two yearly Prices, to be called 
" The Carus Greek Testament Prizes.'*^ 

2. That one of the Frizes shall be open for competition to 
all students who, having been admitted ac2 respondendum quaes* 
tianii are not of sufficient standing to be created Masters of Arts, 
and to students in Civil Law or Medicine, of not more than seven 
years' standing, who shall be required, before they are admitted 
to become candidates, to produce certificates from their respective 
Professors that they have kept the exercises necessary for the 
degree of Bachelor of Law or Physic. 

3. That the other Prize shall be open to all students who 
are not of sufficient standing to be admitted ad respondendum 
quciestionL 

4. That the net proceeds of the Fund, after the Examiners 
have been paid, shall be divided into two equal parts (one for 
each Prize) to be laid out in standard Theological Books, the 
successful candidates being allowed to choose the Books, subject 
to the approval of the Regius Professor of Divinity. 

5. That one Examiner, who shall be a member of the 
Senate, shall be nominated in every year by the Vice-chancellor, 



165 

the three Professors of Divinity, and the Regius Professor of 
Greek, to hold office for two years, and that his name shall be 
proposed to the Senate for election at the first Congregation after 
the B.A. commencement. 

6. That whenever a vacancy may occur, a new Examiner 
shall be nominated and elected in a similar manner. 

7. That each Examiner shall receive five pounds yearly 
out of the proceeds of the Fund. 

8. That the Examination for the Bachelors' Prize shall 
take place on the day (or, if Sunday interfere, on the day next 
but one) following the completion of the Theological Examination. 

9. That the Examination of the Undergraduates' Prize 
shall take place on the Thursday after the (Uvision of Michaelmas 
Term. 

10. That the candidates shall be required to send in their 
names to the Examiners at least a week before the day on which 
they are to be examined* 

11. That each Examination shall consist of two printed 
papers, and shall be concluded in one day. 

12. That the Examinations shall embrace Translation and 
Questions upon the Criticism and Interpretation of the Greek 
Testament. 

13. That no student shall be eligible fer the Bachelors' 
Prize who has not {mssed the Theological Examination. 

14. That the Prizes shall be first given in the year 1854, 
and that two Examiners shall be nominated and elected in the 
Lent Term of that year, of whom one shall hold office only for 
one year. 

15. That a successful candidate shall not be a second time 
elected to receive the same Prize. 



•*^iiW«^^PWi^ S ■Hl^.^^^^aV^VVf^WHI I B-^-Mpa^ppaiV^^a 



166 



XIL Thb Scholb field Prize. 

The friends of the late Rev. James Scholefield, MA., Regius 
Professor of Greek, wishing to establish a Memorial of him in 
the University, and having with that view raised a sum amount- 
ing to £500. 8 per cent, consols, offered that sum to the Univer- 
sity to be applied to the encouragement of the critical study of 
the Holy Scriptures. 

The offer was accepted by the Senate on April 30, 1856 ; 
and a Syndicate was appointed on the same day to draw up 
rules for the institution of such a Prize. 

The recommendations of the Syndicate were adopted by 
Grace, May 22, 1856, as follows : — 

That Uie net proceeds in every year of the Fund presented 
to the University be given as a Prize to that student among 
the Middle Bachelors, who, being in the First Class of Honours 
in the Theological Examination of that year, shall be judged by 
the Examiners to have shown the best knowledge of the Greek 
Testament and of the Septuagint version of the Old Testament. 

That the Prize be called '' The Scholefield Prize,'' and that 
the Prizeman be distinguished as such by a mark attached to his 
name in the list of honours published by the Examiners. 



TRUSTS, STATUTES AND DIRECTIONS 



AFFECTING 



$i\tx §i£t$ anb (!Enki»ments d % l^#(mt^« 



169 



I. Tub Ladt Margaret's Prbachership. 

1. Fund(Mo Dominae Margaretae Comitissae Richmond unius 
Praedicatoris verbi Dei in Universitate cum statutis. 

In Dei Nomine. Amen. Cum excellentissimus Henricus rex 
Angliae et Franciae et dominus Hibemiae septimus de gratia 
sua special! ao ex certa scientia et mero motu suis per literas suas 
patentes, quarum datum est apud Westmonasterium septimo die 
Februarii anno regni sui decimo nono, concesserit et licentiam 
dederit nobis Margaretae Comitissae Richmond matri ejusdem 
domini regis et executoribus nostris, quod nos seu nostrum 
aliquis vel aliqui unam cantariam perpetuam unius Praedicatoris 
verbi Dei ad laudem et honorem sanctae et individuae Trinitatis 
ac fidei Christianae augmentum, necnon ob nostrae animae et 
animarum parentum, progenitorum et antecessorum nostrorum 
ac omnium fidelium defunctorum salutem, in Universitate Canta- 
brigiae Elien. dioc. juxta ordinationes et statuta nostra vel 
executorum nostrorum fundare, creare, erigere et stabilire possi* 
mus, possit aut possint, et quod Praedicator cantariae praedictae, 
cum sic fundatus, creatus, erectus et stabilitus fuerit, Praedica- 
tor verbi Dei per Margaretam Comitissam Richmond matrem 
regis Henrici septimi in Universitate Cantabrigiae fundatus 
nuncupetur, ac quod Praedicator hujusmodi pro tempore existens 
sit unum corpus in re et nomine habeatque successionem per? 
petuam, et quod ipse et successores sui per nomen Praedicato- 
ris verbi Dei per Margaretam Comitissam Richmond matrem 
regis Henrici septimi in Universitate Cantabrigiae ordinati in om- 
nibus et omnimodis actionibus, sectis, causis, querelis et placitis^ 
tam realibus quam personalibus et mixtis, ac placitis assisae novae 
disseisinae et omnibus aliis materiis et causis quibuscunque in qui- 
buscunque curiis tam spiritualibus quam temporalibus implacitare 
possint et implacitari, respondere et responderi, ac per idem nomen 
perquirere, recipere, appropriare, consolidare, annectere et unire, 
habere, gaudere et possidere sibi et successoribus suis, ac dare 
et concedere possint terras, tenementa, redditus, reventiones, ser» 
vitia, portiones, pensiones, apportus et annuitates ac advocationes, 

VOL. III. 1 



170 

hofipitalia, prioratus, liberas capellas ac alia beneficia ecclesias- 
tica quaecunque, necnon omnia et omnimoda haereditamenta ac 
alias possessiones quascunque ac bona et catalla quaecunque 
prout in eisdem literis patentibus plenius continetur. Nos 
^ntedicta Comitissa ratione et vigore literarum ^atentium 
praedictarum ac auctoritate nobis per easdem literas patentes 
concessa tricesimo die Octobris anno regni dicti domini regis et 
filii mei vicesimo unam cantariam perpetuam unius Praedica- 
toris verbi Dei in Universitate Gantabrigiae erigimus, creamus, 
fundamus et stabilimus per praesentes, ac Praedicatorem ilium 
Praedicatorem verbi Dei per Margaretam Comitissam Rich- 
mond matrem regis Henrici septimi in Universitate Ganta- 
brigiae fundatum nuncupari, nominari et vocari ordinamus per 
praesentes. Et quendam magistrum Johannem Fawne sacrae 
Theologiae baccalaureum primum Praedicatorem cantariae prae- 
dictae facimus, creamus et ordinamus per praesentes, et quod 
idem Praedicator habeat successionem perpetuam quodque 
idem Praedicator et successores sui sint unum corpus in re et 
nomine, et quod ipse et successores sui per nomen Praedica- 
toris verbi Dei per Margaretam Gomitissam Richmond matrem 
regis Henrici septimi in Universitate Gantabrigiae ordinati in 
omnibus et onmimodis actionibus, sectis, causis, querelis et 
placitis, tam realibus quam personalibus et mixtis, ac placiti» 
assisae novae disseisinae et in omnibus aliis materiis et causis 
quibuscunque in quibuscunque curiis tam spiritualibus quam 
temporalibus implacitare poesint et implacitari, respondere et 
responderi, ac per idem nomen perquirere, recipere, appropriare, 
oonsolidare, annectere et unire, habere, gaudere et possidere 
sibi et successoribus suis ac dare et concedere possint terras, 
tenementa, redditus, reventiones, servitia, pensiones, portiones, 
apportus et annuitates ac advocationes, hospitalia, prioratus, 
liberas capellas et alia beneficia ecclesiastica quaecunque, necnon 
onmia et omnimoda haereditamenta et alias possessiones quas- 
cunque ac bona et catalla quaecunque. 

YoLUMus insuper et ordinamus per praesentes quod praedictus 
Praedicator verbi Dei et successores sui Praedicatores hujusmodi 
palam, publico, personaliter et solenniter praedicabit aut praedica- 
bunt singulis annis perpetuis futuris temporibus sex solennes et 
publicos sermones in forma quae sequitur : videlicet, omni anno 



171 

Praedicator praedictus pro tempore existens unum sermonem apud 
crueem Sancti Pauli in caemeterio Sancti Pauli London semel uno 
die dominico aut alio consueto, plures sermones ibidem publico et 
Bolenniter praedicabit dum tamen ad ibidem semel praedicandum 
quovismodo licentiam poterit obtinere. Et si idem Praedicator 
unum diem dominicum aut alium ut praedicitur ad praedican- 
dum ibidem, ut praemittitur, sibi assignari semel in anno 
obtinuerit et eodem die sic, ut praedicitur, eidem apud dictam 
crueem limitato propter aliquam rationabilem causam ad prae- 
dicandum non admittatur, de quo impedimento in sabbato ante 
hujusmodi diem dominicum aut alium quemcunque diligenter 
faciet inquisitionem, tunc volumus quod praedicator praedictus 
in Ecdesid Sanctae Margaretae apud Westmonasterium suum 
solenniter praedicabit sermonem ipso eodem die quo apud 
crueem Sancti Pauli praedicare deberet ut praemittitur. Si 
tamen in dicta ecclesia Sanctae Margaretae ex aliqua rationabili 
causa dicto die praedicare nequiverit, tunc volumus quod Prae- 
dicator praedictus eundem sermonem in una Ecclesia excellentiori 
infra civitatem London praedicare omnino teneatur. Volumus 
tamen quod semel saltem infra biennium apud dictam crueem 
Sancti Pauli London omni excusatione postposita unum ad 
minus praedicabit sermonem. Item volumus quod idem praedi- 
cator semel aliqtio die festo in Ecclesiis de Gheshunt, Ware 
(London : Dioc :) Bassingboum, Orwell, Babram (Elien : Dioc :) 
Maxey, duabus ecclesiis parochialibus de Deeping, videlicet Sancti 
Jacobi et Sancti Andreae, Burn, Boston, Swyneshed (Lincoln : 
Dioc :) semel infra biennium solenniter et publico praedic^it. 
Ita tamen quod ad minus sex sermones singulis annis in prae- 
dictis ecclesiis ad placitum suum praedicare teneatur. Volumus 
etiam et ordinamus quod electio et provisio dicti Praedicatoris 
verbi Dei de triennio in triennium ad Cancellarium aut Tice- 
Cancellarium Universitatis Cantabrigiae seu eorum vel eorum 
alterius deputatum et magistros, custodes, praepositos aut praesi- 
dentes collegiorum dictae Universitatis perpetuis futuris tem- 
poribus pertineat in forma quae sequitur, viz: quod Cancellarius 
aut Vice- Cancellarius Universitatis praedictae qui pro tem- 
pore fuerit, vel eorum seu eorum alterius' deputatus, infra qua- 
tttordecim dies a tempore quo officium Praedicatoris praedicti 
vacare contigerit sive per triennii expirationem, per mortem, 

1—2 



172 

cesfiionem, dimissionein, amotionem, alicujus beneficii acceptation 
nem vel quia idem Praedicator in Universitate praedicta resi- 
dere noluerit, convocabit seu convocari faciei ad eeclesiam beatae 
Mariae Yirginis infra dictam Universitatem omnes magistros, 
custodes, praepositos seu praesidentes omnium et singulorum 
collegiorum dictae Universitatis ad tunc in eadem Universitate 
existentes qui interesse voluerint ad eligendum unum Praedica- 
torem verbi Dei aptum, habilem et idoneum ad praedicandum, 
viz: unum sacrae Theologiae doctorem socium perpetuum ali- 
cujus coUegii dictae Universitatis vel alium doctorem extra colle- 
gium in eadem commorantem, si quis doctor in eadem Universitate 
aptus, habilis et ad praedicandum idoneus reperiatur qui dictum 
ofScium praedicandi acceptare et ibidem residere voluerit. Et 
si in collegiis vel extra collegia infra dictam Universitatem non 
reperiatur talis doctor ut praemittitur, tunc volumus quod dictus 
Cancellarius seu Vice-Cancellarius aut eorum vel eorum alterius 
deputatus et magistri, praepositi seu praesidentes collegiorum 
ut praedicitur unum Sacrae Theologiae inceptorem socium 
alicujus collegii vel alibi in dicta Universitate studentem aptum, 
habilem et ad praedicandum idoneum, omni favore, partialitate, 
mercede, timore et afFectione totaliter postpositis, eligant seu 
major pars eorundem magistrorum eligat. Et si per ipsos, 
viz : Cancellarium aut Vice-Cancellarium vel eorum seu eorum 
alterius deputatum et magistros, praepositos seu praesidentes 
praedictos seu per majorem partem eorundem talis sacrae Theo- 
logiae inceptor aptus, habilis et ad praycdicandum idoneus non 
reperiatur, tunc volumus quod idem Cancellarius aut Vice-Can- 
cellarius vel eorum seu eorum alterius deputatus et magistri, 
praepositi seu praesidentes collegiorum praedictorum unum 
Sacrae Theologiae baccalaureum socium alicujus collegii aut alibi 
in Universitate commorantem aptum, habilem et ad praedi- 
candum omnino idoneum, in quo conscientias dictorumCancellarii, 
Vice-Cancellarii ac eorum et eorum alterius deputati et magis- 
trorum, praepositorum sive praesidentium stricte in Domino one- 
ramus, ad officium Praedicatoris verbi Dei eligant. Et si in 
tempore electionis Praedicatoris praedicti Cancellarius aut Vice- 
Cancellarius qui pro tempore fuerit, vel eorum seu eorum alterius 
deputatus, et magistri, praepositi sive praesidentes collegiorum 
dictae Universitatis super uno doctore, inceptore seu baccalaureo 



173 

ut praedicitur unanimiter et concorditer non consenserint, tunc 
Yolumus quod ille doctor, inceptor vel baocalaureus in Fraedica- 
torem praedictum eligatur in quern coram Cancellario ant Yice- 
Gancellario vel eorum seu eorum alterius deputato major pars 
magistrorum, praepositorum sive praesidentium collegiorum prae- 
dictorum consenserit. Proviso semper quod, si sint diversae 
personae ad officium Praedicatoris praedicti aequales voces 
habentes, omnino eligatur et ad officium praedicti Praedica- 
toris admittatur qui votum et vocem Cancellarii aut Vice-Cancel- 
larii vel eorum seu eorum alterius deputati, qui tunc et ibidem 
praesens fuerit, obtinuerit. Proviso semper quod in omni hujus- 
modi electione Praedicatoris nostri aliquis de coUegio Christi 
caeteris paribus praeferatur. Insuper volumus et ordinamus, 
quando et quoties contigerit aliquem talem Praedicatorem in 
eodem officio per triennium continuare, quod tunc infra quatuor- 
decim dies tunc proximo sequentes finem cujuslibet talis triennii 
a primo die admissionis suae in officium suum cantariae Praedi- 
catoris praedicti dies et annos computando, idem aut alius in 
Praedicatorem praedictum eligatur modo et forma superius 
expressis. Volumus etiam quod quilibet talis Praedicator verbi 
Dei, sic ut praemittitur electus, in admissione sua coram Can- 
cellario aut Yice-Cancellario vel eorum seu eorum alterius de- 
putato, magistris et praepositis sive praesidentibus collegiorum 
tunc ibidem existentibus juramentum solemniter praestabit 
corporale quod ipse omnes et singulas ordinationes nostras 
Praedicatoris hujusmodi officium concementes pro parte sua 
juxta vim, formam et effectum earundem bene et fideliter 
observabit et adimplebit, quas quidem ordinationes idem Praedi- 
cator tunc et ibidem de verbo ad verbum, tactis per eum Sanctis 
Evangeliis, coram dicto Cancellario aut Yice-Cancellario vel 
eorum seu eorum alterius deputato et magistris et praepositis 
sive praesidentibus praedictis in dicta sua admissione leget; de 
quibus juramento et lectione Praedicator sic admissus sumptibus 
et expensis suis in registris praedicti Cancellarii aut Yice-Cancel- 
larii pro tempore existentis plenam et expressam mentionem 
fieri faciat. Yolumus etiam quod Praedicator praedictus nullum 
omnino habeat beneficium, et quod, dictis suis sermonibus expe- 
<litis, in dicta Universitate continue resideat, justo et rationabili 
impedimento cessante, in quo conscientiam ejusdem Praedicatoris 



174 

stricte in Domino oneramus. Proviso semper quod idem Prae<- 
dicator possit esse socius cujuscunque coUegii dictae Universi'- 
tatis et habere societatem cujuscunque coUegii ac omnibus et 
singulis ejusdem gaudere emolumentis una cum salario et sti- 
pendio nostris. Volumus etiam et ordinamus quod quilibet 
Praedioator cantariae praedictae perpetuis futuris temporibus in 
singulis suis sermonibus orabit et alios orare exhortabitur pro 
bono et prospero statu nostro fundatricis cantariae praedictae 
dum in humanis vixerimus ac pro felici statu illustrissimi princi- 
pis nostri Henrici septimi carissimi filii mei et principis cum 
tota nobili ejusdem progenie et pro bono statu aliorum omnium 
pro quibus orare decrevimus, et post decessum nostrum pro anima 
nostra et anima nobilissimi principis Johannis ducis Somerset 
ac dominae Margaretae consortis suae progenitorum nostro- 
mm ao pro animabus nobilissimae dominae Elizabethae nuper 
reginae et consortis praedicti domini regis nostri ac domini 
Thomae Stanley Comitis Derby et pro anima praedicti filii mei 
cariasimi cum ab hac luce migraverit, necnon pro animabus 
aliorum omnium pro quibus tenemur et specialiter volumus ad 
Deum preces effundi et pro animabus omnium fidelium defunc- 
torum. Volumus etiam quod idem Praedicator pro tempore 
existens in qualibet missa sua devote dicet pro bono statu nostro, 
durante vita nostra, banc collectam, Deaa qui juatificas impium, 
cum secreto et postcommunione una cum speciali memoria 
nostri in suo memento pro vivis, et post decessum nostrum, Detis 
cut proprium minorem cum secreto et postcommunione una cum 
speciali memoria pro anima nostra et animabus progenitorum et 
antecessorum nostrorum acaUorum omnium superius nominatorum 
pro quibus orari volumus ac pro animabus omnium fidelium 
defunctorum in suo memento pro mortuis. Volumus insuper et 
ordinamus per praesentes quod, si contingat aliquem Praedica- 
torem cantariae praedictae ordinationibus et voluntatibus nostris 
supradictis contravenire aut de aliquo crimine, vitio sen malefacto 
per Cancellarium aut Vice-Cancellarium Universitatis praedictae 
pro tempore existentem aut eorum sen eorum alterius depu- 
tatum et majorem partem magistrorum, praepositorum sen 
custodum coUegiorum Universitatis praedictae tunc et ibidem 
existentium notari, tunc idem Praedicator primo, secundo et 
tertio moneatur; et si ad secundam monitionem se non reforma- 



176 

verit cum efiPectu, tuno per substractionem stipendii secundum 
discretionem Gancellarii aut Yice-Cancellarii praedicti vel eorum 
sen eorum alterius deputati et majoris partis praefatorum 
magistrorum, praepositorum, custodum coUegiorum puniatur, 
quae pecunia sic substracta ad utilitatem Universitatis prae- 
dictae per discretionem Cancellarii vel Vice-Cancellarii praedicti 
aut eorum sen eorum alterius deputati disponatur ; et si post 
tertiam monitionem se non reformaverit tunc ab officio et servitio 
Fraedicatoris praedicti penitus amoveatur. Et yolumus et ordi- 
namus quod quilibet Praedicator verbi Dei pro tempore existena 
habeat pro salario, stipendio et labore suis, viz: pro quolibet 
anno decem libraa. legalis monetae Angliae per Abbatem, 
Friorem et Gonventum monasterii beati Petri Westmonasteriensis 
et successores suos ad Festa Paschae et sancti Michaelis arch- 
angeli per aequalea portiones, juxta voluntatem nostram in 
quibusdam indenturis inter nos et praefatos Abbatem, Priorem 
et Oonventum inde confectis specificatam et declaratam, bene 
et fideliter in dicta Universitate Cantabrigiae ad manum prae- 
dicti Fraedicatoris seu ejus deputati singulis annis persolvendas. 
Nos tamen praefata Gomitissa auctoritatem et potestatem 
explanandi, reformandi et corrigendi omnes et singulas ordina- 
tiones praedicias et earum quamlibet, ac etiam easdem ordina- 
tiones minuendi et in melius mutandi, necnon alias ordinationes 
congruas, utiles et necessarias ordinationibus nostris supradictis 
et earum cuilibet addendi durante vita nostra toties quoties 
nobis videbitur expedire ac hujusmodi Fraedicatoris admissionem 
et amotionem quotiescunque nobis videbitur similiter durante 
vita nostra reservamus per praesentes. In cvjub rbi testimonium 
praesentibus tripartitis indentatis sigillum nostrum apposuimus 
die et anno supradictis. 

2. Conventio Abbatis Westmonasteriensis pro solutione stipendii 
Fraedicatoris verbi Dei exfundatione Dominae Margaretae 
Comitissae Richmond. 

Omnibus Ghristi fidelibus ad quos hoc praesens scriptum per- 
venerit Johannes Abbas monasterii beati Petri Westmonasteri^ 
ensis ac Prior et Gonventus ejusdem monasterii salutem. Sciatis 
nos praefatos Abbatem, Priorem et Gonventum unanimi assensu 
et consensu nostris dedisse, concessisse ac hoc praesenti scripto 



176 

noBtro oonfirmasse Johanni Fawne in sacra theologia baccalaureo 
Praedicatoii verb! Dei in honore nominis Jesu et annunciationis 
beatae Mariae Yirginis per Margaretam Comitissam Richmond 
matrem regis Henrici septimi in Universitate Cantabrigiae 
fundato quandam annuitatem sive annualem redditum decern 
librarum, Habendam, percipiendam et levandam praedictam 
annuitatem sive annualem redditum decem librarum de nobis 
praefatis Abbate, Priore et Conventu et successoribus nostris in 
perpetuum ad festa Paschae et Sancti Micbaelis archangeli in 
Universitate praedicta annuatim solvendam. Et si contingat 
praedictam annuitatem sive annualem redditum decem librarum 
a retro fore praefato Praedicatori aut successoribus suis in parte 
vel in toto per sex septimanas post aliquod festum festorum 
praedictorum, quo ut praefertur solvi debeat, insolutam, quod 
tunc bene licebit praefato Praedicatori et successoribus suis in 
manerium do Drayton cum pertinentiis ac in omnia terras et 
tenementa nostra in West Drayton, Hillingdon, Colham, Wox- 
brigge et in parochiis de Willesdon, Padington, Westbume, et 
Kensington cum pertinentiis in Comitatu Middlesex et quamlibet 
eorumdem parcellam intrare et distringere, districtionesque sic 
ibidem captas licite abducere et penes se retinere, quousque 
eidem Praedicatori et successoribus suis de dicta'annuitate sive 
annuali redditu decem librarum et arreragiis ejusdem, si quae 
fuerint, plenarie fuerit satisfactum et contentatum. Et nos 
praefati Abbas, Prior et Conventus, concedimus et obligamus nos 
et successores nostros praefato Praedicatori et successoribus 
suis per praesentes quod, toties quoties contingat praedictam 
annuitatem sive annualem redditum decem librarum a retro fore 
praefato Praedicatori aut successoribus suis in parte vel in toto 
post duos menses post aliquod festum festorum praedictorum, 
quo ut praefertur solvi debeat, non solutam, nos praefati Abbas, 
Prior et Conventus et successores nostri forisfaciemus et solve- 
mus praefato Praedicatori et successoribus suis viginti solidos 
nomine paenae, et quod bene licebit eidem Praedicatori et suc- 
cessoribus suis tarn pro praedicta annuitate sive annuali redditu 
decern librarum quam pro dictis viginti solidis nomine paenae 
concessis in manerium, terras et tenementa praedicta cum per- 
tinentiis et quamlibet eorumdem parcellam intrare et distringere 
districtionesque sic captas licite asportare, abducere et penes se 



177 

retinere, quousque eidem Praedioatori et BUOcesBoiibus anis tain 
de dicta annuitate sive annuali redditu dooem libranim quam de 
dictifi viginti solidis ut praefertur nomine paenae concessis 
plenarie fuerit satisfactum et persolutum. Proviso semper 
quod si eontingat (quod absit) manerium, terras et tenementa 
praedicta a possessione et seisina nostris praediotorum Abbatis, 
Prioris et Conventus aut suocessorum nostrorum justo et legi- 
timo titulo absque fraude, collusione et covina nostris vel 
Bucoessorum nostrorum et non in defectu nostro praedictorum 
Abbatis, Prioris et Conventus et suocessorum totaliter evinci, et 
nos praefatos Abbatem, Friorem et Conventum et successores 
nostros a possessione sua inde justo et legitime titulo ab eisdem 
sine fraude, colfusione et covina nostris praedictorum Abbatis 
Prioris et Conventus vel suocessorum nostrorum per unum 
annum integrum extra teneri, aut si eontingat ecclesiam 
parochialem de Cheshunt in Comitatu Hertford, (Lend : dioc :) 
aut ecclesiam parochialem de Swynshed in Comitatu Lincoln, 
(Lincoln: dioc:) quae nobis praefatis Priori et Conventui et sue- 
cesBoribus nostris appropriatae existunt, a possessione nostra 
praedictorum Abbatis, Prioris et Conventus aut successorum 
nostrorum sine fraude, collusione et covina nostris et suoces- 
sorum nostrorum legitime evinci, et appropriationes praedictas 
legitime dissolvi et evacuari, nosque praefatos Abbatem, Friorem 
et Conventum aut successores nostros ab eisdem ecclesiis seu 
eorum altera sine fraude, collusione et covina et assensu nostris 
praedictorum Abbatis, Prioris et Conventus aut successorum 
nostrorum per unum annum integrum justo et legitime titulo 
extra teneri, quod extunc praesens concessio dictae annuitatis 
sive annualis redditus decem libranim omnino cessetur et 
evacuetur et omni sue robore careat et virtute. In cujus rei 
testimonium huic praesenti scripto nostro sigillum nostrum 
commune apposuimus. Datum septimo die Novembris anno 
Domini millesimo quingentesimo quinto, et anno regni regis 
Henrici septimi post Conquestum vicesimo prime. 

3. The decree of the Court of Augmentations for the Lady 

Margarets Preacher, 

Hbnrigus Octavos Dei gratia Angliae Franciae et Hibemiae rex, 
fidei defensor et in terra ecclesiae Anglicanae et Hibemicae 



178 

fiapremum caput, omnibus ad quos praesentes literae pervenerint 
salutem: Inspeximus inter recorda et irrotulamenta curiae 
augmentationum reventionum coronae nostrae quoddam decre- 
turn per Cancellarium et consilium ejusdem curiae secundum 
haec verba : 

Memorandum — Where the excellent Princess Margaret, 
some time Countess of Richmond and Derby, now deceased, 
mother to the right excellent Prince of famous memory, Henry 
the Seventh, late King of England, father to our Sovereign 
Lord King Henry the £ighth, by licence given and granted to 
her by the said King Henry the Seventh, erected, founded, 
ordained, established and made a perpetual^ chantry of one 
Preacher of the word of God in the University of Cambridge 
within the diocese of Ely, commonly called the Preacher of the 
word of Ood in the honor of the name of Jesu and the annun- 
ciation of our blessed Lady the Virgin, founded in the Univer- 
sity of Cambridge within the diocese of Ely by Margaret 
Countess of Richmond, mother of King Henry the Seventh, 
which Preacher should have yearly for his stipend and wage ten 
pounds of lawful money of England to be paid by the Abbot, 
Prior and Convent of the late monastery of Saint Peter of 
Westminster and their successors, in consideration of certain 
manors, lands, tenements and other hereditaments freely given 
and granted by the said Countess to the said Monastery to bear 
and support as well the said stipend and salary as also divers 
other charges, as by one book indented, made between the said 
Countess and the said Abbot, Prior and Convent, bearing date 
the second day of March in the twenty-first year of the reign 
of the most excellent Prince of famous memory King Henry 
the Seventh, father to our said Sovereign Lord, more plainly 
appeareth. And where the Abbot, Prior and Convent of the 
said late monastery after the foundation of the said chantry by 
their writing under their Convent Seal hath according to their 
covenant and grant contained in the said book indented, and 
according also to the confidence and trust put in them by the 
said Countess, granted and made sure to one John Fawne first 
nominate Preacher, and to his successors Preachers for ever, 
one annuity or yearly rent of ten pounds at the feasts of Easter 
and Saint Michael the archangel in the said University yearly 



179 

to be paid, with one clause of distress in the manor of Drayton 
in the county of Middlesex, and in divers other lands and 
tenements comprised in their said grant, as by the said deed 
bearing date the sixth day of November in the said twenty-first 
year of the reign of the said excellent Prince King Henry the 
Seventh more plainly appeareth, which said monastery of Saint 
Peter of Westminster with the whole possessions and revenues 
spiritual and temporal thereof is now given, surrendered and 
come to our said Sovereign Lord King Henry the Eighth. 
Forasmuch as upon due examination it is duly proved before 
the Chancellor and jsounsel of the Court of Augmentations of 
the revenues of our Sovereign Lord the King^s crown, that the 
said annuity or annual rent of ten pounds was continually paid 
by the Abbot and Convent of the said late monastery for the 
time being to the said Preacher before and until the time of 
the dissolution of the said late monastery, and because also it 
is the King's pleasure that the said Preacher shall continue 
according to the foundation of the said chantry ; It is there- 
fore ordered and decreed by the said Chancellor and counsel in 
the term of the Holy Trinity, that is to say, the tenth day of 
June in the thirty-fourth year of the reign of our Sovereign 
Lord King Henry the Eighth, that one Henry Pauley now 
Preacher and his successors Preachers according to the founda- 
tion of the said chantry contained in the said book indented 
shall have and enjoy for ever the said annuity or annual rent of 
ten pounds sterling, to be paid by the hands of the treasurer of 
the said Court of Augmentations for the time being of such the 
King's treasure of the same Augmentations as shall remain in 
the hands of the same treasurer at the said feasts of Easter and 
Saint Michael the archangel by even portions. And it is 
further ordered and decreed by the said Chancellor and counsel 
that the said Preacher shall have all the arrearages of the said 
annuity due sythen and from the feast of Saint Michael the 
archangel in the thirty-first year of the reign of King Henry 
the Eighth, to be paid by the hands of the said treasurer of the 
treasure aforesaid. 

Nos autem tenorem decreti praedicti ad requisitionem 
praedicti Praedicatoris duximus exemplificandum per prae- 
sentes. In cujus rei testimonium has literas nostras fieri 



180 

fecimus patentes teste Ricardo Ryehe milite apud Westmonaste- 
rium sexto deoimo die Junii anno regni nostri tricesimo quarto. 

4. Letter of King Charles the Second, 

Charles R. Trusty and well-beloved, we greet you well. 

Whereas the Lady Margaret, late Countess of Richmond 
and Derby, in her foundation of a Preacher in that our Univer- 
sity did oblige him to preach at twelve or thirteen several 
towns in several Counties, and accordingly did allow him what 
was in those days a competent salary and sufficient for the dis- 
charging of the expences of his journey: We, understanding 
that the salary of the said Preacher is now very small and 
inconsiderable, and therefore being disposed to free him from 
the said expensive duties, have thought fit and accordingly do 
hereby dispense with all those that shall be her Preachers for 
the future for their not preaching at the places aforesaid; 
provided that they do all other exercises in the University unto 
which by the said foundation or custom they are obliged. And 
our pleasure also is that you alter the oath which the said 
Preachers at their entrance were to take according to these 
premises, and that you cause these our royal letters of dispen- 
sation to be registered in the University register as the rule to 
be observed for the future as to the foundation aforesaid. And 
for so doing this shall be your warrant. And so we bid you 
farewell. 

Given at our Court at Whitehall, the 30th day of October, 
1679, in the 31st year of our reign. 

By His Majesty's command, 

Sunderland. 

To our trusty and well-beloved the Vice- Chancellor 
of our University of Cambridge to be communi- 
cated to the Senate there. 



J 



181 



II. Commemoration of Kino Henry the Seventh. 

1. Foundation Deed, 20 Nov. 20 JET. VIL 

This Indenture quadripartite made between the most Chris- 
tian King Henry the Seventh, by the grace of God King of Eng- 
land and of France and Lord of Ireland, the twentieth day of 
November, the twentieth year of his most noble reign, of the one 
part : And John Islippe, Abbot of the monastery of Saint Peter of 
Westminster, and the Prior and Convent of the same monastery, of 
the second part: And the Chancellor, Masters and Scholars, of the 
University of Cambridge, of the third part: And the Mayor and 
Commonalty of the City of London, of the fourth part : Wit- 
nesseth that the said Abbot, Prior and Convent of the said 
monastery of Saint Peter of Westminster, according to the intent 
and effect of Indentures of covenants, made between the said 
King our Sovereign Lord, and the same Abbot, Prior and 
Convent, bearing date the sixteenth day of July last past, and 
according to the confidence and trust that our Sovereign Lord 
the King hath put in the same Abbot, Prior and Convent, and 
their successors, truly and effectually to execute and perform the 
devout will and mind of our said Sovereign Lord the King in 
that behalf : Hath given and granted, and by these presents give 
and grant, for them and their successors, unto the said Chancellor, 
Masters and Scholars of the said University of Cambridge, and 
their successors, to the use of the same University, an annuity 
or annual rent of ten pounds, to have and perceive of the said 
Abbot, Prior and Convent, and their successors, to the said 
Chancellor, Masters and Scholars, and their successors yearly 
for ever while the world shall endure, in the feast of Saint Michael 
the archangel or within one and twenty days next after every 
such feast, in the church of our Lady called Saint Mary's Church, 
in the said University of Cambridge, to be employed and dis- 
posed for the common weal of the same University. To the 
which payment of the said annuity or annual rent of ten 
pounds, well and truly to be contented and paid yearly 



A 



182 

while the world shall endure, within the days and place above 
rehearsed, the said Abbot, Prior and Convent bind them 
and their successors unto the said Chancellor, Masters and 
Scholars of the said University of Cambridge, and their suc- 
cessors, by these presents : And over that the said Abbot, Prior 
and Convent covenant and grant for them and their successors, 
and them and their successors bind by these presents, to the 
said Chancellor, Masters and Scholars of the said University 
of Cambridge, and their successors. That as often as it shall 
happen the said annuity or annual rent of ten pounds, or any 
parcel thereof, to be behind unpaid by the space t>f one and 
twenty days next after any of the said feasts, contrary to the 
form and effect of these Indentures, that then and so often the 
said Abbot, Prior and Convent, and their successors, shall forfeit, 
content and pay, and bind them and their successors to content 
and pay, to the said Chancellor, Masters and Scholars of 
the said University of Cambridge, and their successors, twenty 
pounds of lawful money of England in the name of a pain over 
and above the said sum of ten pounds : And the said Chancellor, 
Masters and Scholars covenant and grant, for them and their 
successors, and them and their successors' bind to the said Mayor 
and Commonalty, and their successors, by these presents, that the 
same Chancellor, Masters and Scholars, and their successors, 
shall hold and keep a solemn anniversary, in the said church of 
our Lady, in the said University, yearly while the world shall 
endure, in manner and form following ; that is to say, during the 
life of the same King our Sovereign Lord, in the eleventh day of 
February, as often as it shall not fall upon any Sunday, and as 
often as it shall happen to fall upon any Sunday in the year, 
that then and so often the same Chancellor, Masters and Scholars, 
and their successors, shall hold and keep the same anniversary 
in the Saturday next before every such Sunday : All and every 
the same anniversaries to be holden and kept for the good and 
prosperous estate of the said King our Sovereign Lord during his 
life, and for the prosperity of this his realm ; And for the soul of 
the right excellent Princess Elizabeth, late Queen of England, 
his wife, and for the souls of their children and issue, and for the 
soul of the right excellent Prince Edmond, late Earl of Kichmond, 
father to our said Sovereign Lord the King, and for all the other 



183 

progenitors and ancestors of the same King our Sovereign Lord, 
and for the sonl of the right excellent Princess Margaret, Countess 
of Richmond and Derby, mother to our said Sovereign Lord the 
King after her decease ; And after the decease of the said Eing 
our Sovereign Lord, then and from thenceforth as long as the 
world shall endure, to hold and keep the said anniversary yearly, 
in the day of the year of the sepulture of the same King our 
Sovereign Lord, without any further change, as often as the same 
day shall not fall upon any Sunday in the year other than 
Easter>day ; And as often as it shall happen to fall upon any 
Sunday in the year other than Easter-day, that then and so often 
the same Chancellor, Masters and Scholars, and their successors, 
shall hold and keep the same anniversary in the Saturday next 
before every such Sunday : And as often as it shall happen any 
of the same anniversaries to be holden and kept upon any Shere- 
Thursday, Good-Friday, Easter-even, Easter-day, or Easter* 
Monday, then and so often the same Chancellor, Masters and 
Scholars, and their successors, shall hold and keep the same anni- 
versary in the Saturday in the Easter-week then next following ; 
And all the same anniversaries to be holden and kept specially 
and principally for the soul of the same Eing our Sovereign Lord, 
and for the soul of the said right excellent Princess Elizabeth, 
late Queen of England, his wife, and for the souls of their 
children and issue, and for the other souls afore rehearsed, and 
all Christian souls, with all such prayers, observances and cere- 
monies, in and at every of the said anniversaries as hereafter 

ensueth. 

• « • « 

Then foUows a particular description of the Services. 

« ♦ * « • 

And it is the very mind, will and intent of the said King 
our Sovereign Lord, that the said ten pounds yearly which shall 
be contented and paid by the said Abbot, Prior and Convent of 
the said monastery of Saint Peter of Westminster, and their suc- 
cessors, in form aforesaid unto the said Chancellor, Masters and 
Scholars, and their successors, for every of the said anniversaries 
as is afore rehearsed, «id every sum that shall be forfeited at 
any time for non-payment thereof, shall be put in the chest of 
the said University, and after that be employed to the common 



184 

profit and use of the same University : Provided alway that as 
often as it shall happen any of the said anniversaries to be 
holden and kept on any day in any year that the said Chancellor, 
Masters and Scholars be bound to hold and keep any other solemn 
anniversary in the same University, or any general procession, 
or in any day of the commencement's solemn acts, solemn sermons, 
that then and so often at every such time only the said Chancellor, 
Masters and Scholars, and their successors, shall hold and keep 
every such anniversary with such Placebo, Dirige, nine lessons, 
laudes and mass of Requiem, with orisons, prayers, observances 
and sermons afore rehearsed, in the next day that they conve- 
niently can or may, without any further deferring or delay. 
And the said Chancellor, Masters and Scholars of the said Uni- 
versity covenant and grant, and them and their successors bind 
to the said Mayor and Commonalty of the said City of London 
and their successors by these presents, that whensoever and as 
often as the same Chancellor, Masters and Scholars of the said 
University of Cambridge, or their successors, shall fail and 
make default in keeping of any of the said anniversaries, 
that then and so often the same Chancellor, Masters and 
Scholars of the ssdd University of Cambridge, and their suc- 
cessors, shall forfeit, content and pay, and bind themselves and 
their successors by these presents to content and pay, to the said 
Mayor and Commonalty, and their successors, for every such 
default twenty pounds of lawful money of England : And also 
whensoever and as often as the same Chancellor, Masters and 
Scholars, and their successors, shall fail or omit at or in any of 
the said anniversaries any particular thing afore rehearsed to be 
had or done, at or in any of the same anniversaries, that then 
and so often the same Chancellor, Masters and Scholars, and 
their successors, shall forfeit, content and pay, and bind them 
and their successors to the said Mayor and Commonalty, and 
their successors, by these presents, to content and pay to the 
same Mayor and Commonalty and their successors for every 
such default, that is to say, for every particular thing so 
omitted and left undone, contrary to the form, manner and order 
above rehearsed, forty shillings of lawful money of England: 
In witness whereof, &c. 



186 

■ - V , . . . 

"^2. Decree of the Court of Augmentations for the same. 

Hbnricus Octavus, Dei gratia Angliae, Pranciae et Hiberniae 
Rex, fidei defensor ^t in terra ecclesiae Anglicanae et Hibernicae 
supremum caput, omnibus ad quos praesentes literae pervenerint 
saltttem : Inspeximus inter recorda et irrotulamenta curiae augmen- 
tationum reventionum coronae nostrae quoddatn decretum per 
Cancellarium et consilium ejusdem curiae factum in haec verba; Me- 
morandum, Forasmuch as it is duly proved before the Chancellor 
and Counsel of the Court of Augmentations of the revenues of our 
Sovereign Lord ^the King^s Crown, that the Chancellor, Masters 
and Scholars of the University of Cambridge, and their prede- 
cessors, Chancellors, Masters and Scholars of the same University, 
have heretofore had and continually enjoyed one annuity or 
annual rent of ten pounds sterling, yearly payable and going out 
of the possessions of the late monastery of St Peter of West- 
minster, as by an Indenture quadripartite made between the 
most noble King of famous memory Henry the Seventh, late 
King of England, on the one part, and the Abbot and Convent 
of the said late monastery of St Peter of Westminster on the 
second part, the Chancellor, Masters and Scholars of the said 
University of Cambridge on the third part, and the Mayor and 
Commonalty of the City of London on the fourth part, bearing 
date the 20th day of November, in the twentieth year of the 
reign of the said King Henry the Seventh more plainly it may 
appear : It is thbrbforb ordbrbd and decrbbd by the said 
Chancellor and Counsel in the term of St Michael, that is to say, 
the 10th day of October, in the thirty -sixth year of the reign of 
our Sovereign Lord King Henry the Eighth, by the grace of 
God King of England, France and Ireland, Defender of the 
Faith, and of the Church of England and also of Ireland in 
earth the supreme head, that the said Chancellor, Masters and 
Scholars of the University of Cambridge aforesaid shall have to 
them and their successors, Chancellors, Masters and Scholars of 
the same University, the said annuity or annual rent of ten 
pounds sterling, together with all the arrearage thereof due unto 
them sythen and from the dissolution of the said late monas- 
tery of St Peter of Westminster hitherto, by the hands of the 
receiver of the revenues of the augmentations of our Sovereign 

VOL III. 2 



186 

LfOrd the King's crown within the county of Middlesex for the 
time being of the same revenues remaining in his hands at the 
feast of St Michael the archangel only yearly to be psud accord- 
ing to the true purport and effect of the said indenture. 

Nos AUTBM tenorem decreti praedicti ad requisitionem Can- 
cellarii, Magistrorum et Scholarium Universitatis Cantabrigiae 
praedictae duzimus ezemplificandum per praesentes : In oujus 
rei testimonium has Uteras nostras fieri fecimus patentes, teste 
Edwardo North milite apud Westmonasterium duodecimo die 
Octobris anno regni nostri tricesimo sexto. 

3. Statuta Reginae Elizahethae anno 12mo edita. 

Cap. 45, de Condonibus. 

.... Octavo Maii ad Henrici Septimi oommendationem 
sacra concio sit quam regius in theologia professor faciet . . . 



187 



III. Thb Barnaby Lecturers. 

1. A Foundation of three Public Lectures j viz. in Humanity y 
Logic and Philosophy, given by Sir Robert Reade, the 
King^s Chi^ Justice of the Common Bench, to be read in 
the Common Schools for ever. 

This Indenture tripartite, made between the Right Reverend 
Father in God, John, Bishop of Rochester, Chancellor of the 
University of Cambridge, Vice-Chancellor, and the Regents and 
Non-Regents of the same, on the one part; and Sir Robert 
Brudenell, Enight, Chief Justice to the King our Sovereign Lord, 
of his Common Bench at Westminster, Thomas Willoughbie, 
one of the Serjeants at the Law, Mr. William Capon, Doctor 
of holy Divinity, Christopher Bland, Master of Arts, and Wil- 
liam Geffrie, Clerk, executors of the testament of Sir Robert 
Reade, Enight, deceased, and late the Eing's Chief Justice of 
the aforesaid Common Bench, on the second part; and Mr. 
William Capon, Doctor of holy Divinity, and Master of the 
College of our Blessed Lady St Mary the Virgin, St John the 
Evangelist, and St Radegunde, in the said University of Cam- 
bridge, vulgarly called Jesus College^ and the Fellows of the 
same College, on the third part; Witnesseth that it is cove- 
nanted, promised, and agreed between the said parties and every 
of them in the manner and form following, that is to say, first, 
that whereas the Right Reverend Father in God, John Malyn, 
Abbot of the exempt Monastery of Waltham Holy Cross in the 
County of Essex, and the Convent of the same Monastery, by 
their deed sufficient in the law under the common and convent 
seal, dated the first day of November the sixteenth year of the 
reign of our Sovereign Lord Henry the Eighth of England and 
France Eyig, Defender of the Faith, and Lord of Ireland, 
granted to the foresaid Mr. William Capon, Master of the said 
College, a yearly annuity of twenty marks, the fifth day of 
November, and the sixth day of May, yearly, by even portions 
to be paid, to have and yearly to perceive an annuity of twenty 

2—2 



188 

marks to the said Master and Fellows of the same College, and 
to their successors and assigns for ever, as by the said deed and 
other their writing under the common and convent seal of the 
said Abbot and Convent concerning the true payment of the 
said yearly rent of twenty marks more plainly doth appear: 
the purchase of which annuity to the said Master and Fellows, 
and to their successors, was at the only costs and charges of the 
forenamed executors of the above-named Sir Robert Beade, and 
of the proper goods and money late the said Sir Robert Reade's, 
and was only to the uses and intents hereafter ensuing, that is 
to say, Whereas there be three Lectures continually read and 
kept in the term time in the common Schools of the said Univer- 
sity for ordinaries to the students in art there, that is to say 
one Lecture in Humanity, the second in Logic, and the third in 
Philosophy, natural or moral; The said Chancellor, Vice-Chan- 
cellor. Regents, and Non-Regents grant for them and their suc- 
cessors, by these presents, to the foresaid other parties and to 
either of them, that the Readers of the foresaid three Lectures 
shall be named and chosen by the forenamed executors, and if 
any of them decease, then by the survivors of them as long as 
any of them be alive; and the same executors, and the survivors 
of them, at all times to have authority and power, for causes 
them moving, to discharge the said Readers so elected and every 
of them, and to elect and choose other to succeed them in their 
rooms and places; And after the decease of all the said executors, 
all the said Readers to be chosen after the laudable custom and 
usage of the said University ; Except and provided always, that 
the same election to be made and had the tenth day of June, or 
within two days next after the said day, and that the said 
Readers so elected or instituted be of several Shires and several 
Counties born, and of such scholars as shall be thought most apt 
and able for the said reading, and most profitable for the instruc- 
tion of the scholars coming to the said Lectures, and indifferently 
to be chosen without any partiality or favour to be shewn to 
any County or any particular scholar; and that the said Reader, 
reading in the said Lecture of Humanity, and his successors 
reading like Lecture, shall have for his and their labour and 
stipend for the year four pounds of lawful money, and the 
Reader of the said Lecture of Logic, and his successors reading 



189 

like Lecture, to have for his and their labour and stipend for the 
year other four pounds of lawful money, and the Reader of the 
said Lecture of Philosophy, natural or moral, and his successors 
reading like Lecture, to have for his and their labour and stipend 
for the year other four pounds of lawful money, by equal por- 
tions at three times in the year to be paid, that is to say, the 
last day of Christmas term, the last day of Easter term, and the 
last day of Michaelmas term, to every of the foresaid three 
Readers six and twenty shillings and eight-pence, and if any of 
the said Readers decease, or die, or for any other cause be de- 
parted or amoved from reading of the said Lecture, that then 
the foresaid scholars and electors, and their successors, shall 
choose, name, and admit a new Reader within five days next 
following to the room of the said Reader so departed, and the 
same election to be of him after the manner and form above ex- 
pressed : And the same Master of the said College, called Jesus 
College, and the Fellows of the same College, grant and permit 
by these presents to the other parties above-said, and to either of 
them, that they and their successors shall well and truly content 
of the aforesaid annuity of twenty marks the aforesaid sums of 
money to the foresaid three Readers yearly and quarterly, after 
the rate above limited, as long as they may enjoy and have to 
them paid the foresaid annuity of twenty marks of lawful money 
by the foresaid Abbot and Convent, and by their successors; 
And the foresaid Chancellor, Vice- Chancellor, Regents, and Non- 
Regents, and also the foresaid Master of the said College of 
Jesus and the Fellows of the same, and every of them, grant 
and permit by these presents to the foresaid executors of the said 
Sir Robert Reade, and to their heirs, and to the heirs of every 
of them, that they and their successors shall from henceforth 
endeavour themselves to the best they can, at their proper costs 
and charges, to cause the same annuity and rent of twenty marks 
well and truly, yearly, to be paid to the said Master and Fel- 
lows of the said College, and to their successors for ever here- 
after, if any danger of the said annuity of twenty marks be had: 
And if the said Master and the Fellows, or their successors, fail 
of payment of the said money to the foresaid Readers, or to any 
of them in part or in all at the times of payment of the same 
after manner above-said that then the said Master and Fellows^ 



190 

add thoir Buccessora, shall forfeit and pay to the said Chancellor, 
Vice-chancellor, Regents, and Non-Regents, and to their succes- 
sors for the time being, forty shillings of lawful money in the 
name of a pain to be employed to the commonwealth and use of 
.the said University: And that it shall be lawful to the said 
Chancellor, Yioe-Chancellor, Regents, and Non-Regents of the 
said UniTersity, and to their successors, and to every of them, 
to enter into the lands and tenements of the said Master and 
Fellows in any place wherein soever they be, and there to dis- 
train, and the distresses there taken to lead, carry, and drive 
away, and the same to impound and keep unto the time the said 
Readers, and every of them, be fully content and satisfied of 
their said money to them due, and the said Chancellor, Vice- 
Chancellor, Regents, and Non-Regents, be truly contented and 
paid of the foresaid forty shillings of lawful money in the name 
cf a pain as is above-said forfeit, satisfied and paid: Provided 
always that if the said Master and Fellows, or their successors, 
be hereafter lawfully evicted and avoided of the said annuity of 
twenty marks, without fraud or covin, that then the said Master 
and Fellows, nor their successors, be not hereafter that lawful 
eviction of the said annuity so had, charged nor enforced to the 
payment of the said annuity, nor of any other money out of the 
same, or for nonpayment of the same at any time ever after to 
the foresaid Readers nor to any of them nor any other, nor 
with any penalty or payment of money thereupon made or or- 
dained, any clause in these Indentures to the c(mtrary notwith- 
standing. And for this said money thus to be paid yearly to 
the said three Readers and to their successors the foresaid 
Chancellor, yice-ChanceUor, Regents, and Non-Regents, by the 
eommon assent and consent of the body of the whole University, 
also covenant, grant, and permit by these presents to the said 
Master and Fellows of the foresaid College, and to their succes- 
sorsi, and to the foresaid executors, and to their heirs, and to the 
heirs of every of them, that the foresaid three Lectures shall be 
called free Lectures, and shall be from henceforth for evw read 
frank and free to all manner of scholars of the said University 
bearing or bound to hear the same Lectures, and to every of 
them, without any other thing to be paid for the same: And 
that the Chancellor or Yioe-Chancellor of the said Universnty, 



191 

their substitute or substitutes, or any the officer or officers, as 
principals or Readers, or any other, shall not at any time here- 
after demand, procure, have or receive, by themselves or by 
any other for them, any manner of money, gift^ or other things, 
of any student or scholar for thmr ordinsuries or Lectures in 
Humanity^ Logic, or in Philosophy, natural or morale nor of any 
of them; But the said Chancellor, Vice-Chancellor, Regents, 
and Non-Regents, grant and permit by these presents, for them 
Mid their successors, that all the graduates of the said Univer- 
sity, religious men and other, shall from henceforth be free, quit, 
and discharged for paying of any money, gift, or any other thing 
for the said ordinaries and Lectures and every of them for ever: 
And that every of the said scholars appointed for to read the said 
three Lectures called the ordinaries in the midst of their term, 
when the scholars shall be assembled together most in number 
by their estimation, shall say, and cause the same scholars to 
say, with an audible voice openly, the Psalm of De Profundis, 
with the orisons and collects belonging thereto, and after say: 
Anima Roberti Reade militis defuncti nuper capitalis Justiciarii 
Domini regis de communi Banco fundatoris hujus Lecturae, et 
anima Dominae Margaretae consortis suae, et animae omnium 
fidelium defunctorum per Dei misericordiam in pace requiescant. 
Amen. Moreover the said Chancellor, Yice-Chancellor, Regents, 
and Non-Regents, covenant and grant by these presents, that 
whensoever it shall happen at any time hereafter any scholar or 
scholars to be admitted to any degree in Art, as Bachelor or 
Master, and the said scholar or scholars have not their full or 
complete terms according to the statutes and ordinsuices of the 
said University for such degrees ordained, and thereupon their 
grace gotten to proceed, that the same scholar or scholars shall 
frankly and freely proceed to their degree whereunto he or they 
be admitted, and not hereafter to pay luiy fine, emolument, 
money, or other fee or reward to the Chancellor, Vice-Chan- 
cellor. Proctors, Masters of Colleges, and Principals or Readers, 
or to any other person of the said University from henceforth 
for the ordinaries of such terms as the same scholar or scholars 
do so lack, but all parties to be satisfied and contented with such 
stipends or fees as be limited to the aforesaid ordinaries : Also 
the said Chancellor, Vice-CbanceUor, Regents, and Non^'Regents, 






192 

covenant and grant by these presents, that all graduates of the 
said University of what degree that they be of, in every of their 
sermons called sermons ad clernm hereafter to be made within 
the said University, and also in every of their sermons at Paul's 
Cross in London, shall specially and openly rehearse the name 
of the said Sir Robert Reade, there to be prayed for as one of 
the great benefactors of the said University, beseeching the whole 
audience to have his said soul in remembrance, and specially to 
be prayed for, and hereto to make promise at the time of their 
admission: And the said Chancellor, Yice-ChanGellor, Regents, 
and Non-Regents, further covenant and grant for them and their 
successors, that they and their successors shall cause yearly to be 
kept a solemn Anniversary on the twentieth day of January in 
the University Church of the said University, called St Mary's 
Church, for the souls of the said Sir Robert Reade, and dame 
Margaret his wife, and the souls of their fathers and mothers, 
children, and all Christian souls, in this manner following, that is 
to say, in the day before the said Obit at afternoon a solemn 
Dirige by note, and on the morrow next following a solemn Mass 
or Requiem by note, with lights and other exequies and solem- 
nities there accustomed: And the Vice- Chancellor of the said 
University, if he be present, and in his absence some other 
honourable Doctor of Divinity of the said University, to minister 
and do the observances both at Dirige and at Mass or Requiem, 
and to have for his labour therein sixteen-pence : And at the 
same Anniversary shall be all the Doctors with the Oremials as 
well Regents as Non-Regents with all their graduates and stu- 
dents in art then being in the said University : And that yearly 
for ever, more immediately before the beginning of the said Obit 
or Anniversary, after the scholars be assembled in the said 
Church, the statutes and ordinances provided and made for the 
true observing and keeping of the articles in these present Inden- 
tures made and had shall be read and openly declared in the 
middle aisle of the said church, before the congregation there 
present, by one of the Proctors of the said University, and he 
for to have for his labour twelve-pence of lawful money, and the 
other Proctor in like manner other twelve-pence, and the three 
Bedells eighteen-pence, that is to say, for every of them six- 
pence, and the bellringer for ringing to the Dirige and Mass 



193 

four-pence, and to the Master of Jesus College, or in his absence 
to his substitute, twelve-pence, whereof the said Master or sub*- 
stitute shall offer at the Mass four-pence, and for wax six-pence : 
All these sums aforesaid to be paid by the bands of the said 
Master, President, or substitute of the prenominate Jesus College, 
which sums in all do amount to the sum of six shillings and 
eight-pence : And that all the Gremials and graduates, and all 
other scholars in art, being then in the said University, shall be 
openly warned by the Bedells, after the custom of the said 
University, to be at the said Anniversary for the more better 
remembrance and continuance of the premises to be continued : 
And that every of the said Gremials, graduates and scholars, 
yearly, at every of the said Anniversaries, shall sing or say for 
the soul of the said Sir Robert Reade, and other the souls afore* 
said, Placebo and Dirige with the Psalms, collects and orisons 
and other exequies thereto accustomed. And furthermore, the 
said Chancellor, yice-Chancellor, Regents, and Ifon-Regents 
grant and permit for them and their successors by these presents, 
that if any doubt or ambiguity hereafter be had or found in any 
article, clause, or word contained in these Indentures, or in any 
part thereof, that the said article, clause, or word, wherein such 
doubt or ambiguity to them is had or found, shall be interpreted 
and made plain by the forenamed executors, during their lives, 
or the overliver of either of them, according to their true mean- 
ing, and such interpretation or exposition as they do make to 
endure, and to be observed and kept, and so to continue for 
evermore: And whereas the said executors have caused to be 
made a table or board with two leaves and with a chain and i^ 
staple fastened to the same table in the common schools of the 
said University, and have caused to be written within the same 
table plain ordinances and statutes in parchment for a remem- 
brance of the covenants, grants, and promises aforesaid to be 
truly performed and kept after the tenor and form of the same, 
the foresaid Chancellor, yice-Chancellor, Regents, and Non-» 
Regents, grant and permit for them and their successors that 
the said table with the said statutes and ordinances thereia 
written shall perpetually there stand and remain : And if the 
said table or the statutes within the same be hereafter taken 
away, that then the said Chancellor, Vice- Chancellor, Regents, 



194 

and K^on-Regenis, covenant and grant by these presents to caose 
to be made a new like table or board with two leaves, and cause 
the same table within two months next after the said other table 
is so taken away to be hanged with a chain in the foresaid 
place of the said common schools, after like manner as the first 
was, and in the said table cause to be written new again all the 
l<»*esaid ordinances and statutes in the said old table contained, 
and so often as any of the said tables or statutes be taken away. 
And the said Chancellor, Vice-chancellor, Regents, and Non*- 
Regents, grant and permit by these presents for them and their 
successors that they shall well and truly observe and keep, and 
cause to be observed, performed and kept, all the foresaid cove- 
nants, promises and agreements on their part to be observed, 
performed and kept: And for the further surety of the true 
conservation of the premises on their part to be observed and 
kept, they shall cause a statute and ordinance to be msbde in the 
said University within three months next after the sealing of 
these Indentures, and by the same statute and ordinance to bind 
them and their successors, students in art, to fulfil and observe 
all the premises on their part to be observed and kept. In wit- 
ness whereof to the one part of these present Indentures tripar- 
tite remaining with the said Chancellor, and yice-Chancellor, 
Regents, and Non-Regents, the foresaid executors have put to 
their seals, and the said Master and FeUows of the said College 
have also put to their common seal of the same College ; And to 
the second part of these said Indentures, remaining with the 
forenamed executors, the foresaid Chancellor, and Vice-chan- 
cellor, Regents, and Non-Regents, have put to the common seal 
of the said University, and the said Master and Fellows of the 
said College have also put to their common seal of the said College ; 
And to the third part * of these present Indentures remaining 
with the said Master and Fellows of the said College, the fore- 
said Chancellor, and Yice-Chancellor, Regents, and non-Regents, 
have put to their common seal of the said University, and the 
said executors have also put to their seals : Given the tenth 
day of December, in the year of our Lord Ood one thousand 
five hundred and twenty-four, and in the sixteenth year of the 
reign of our Sovereign Lord Henry the Eighth, of England and 
France King, Defender of the Faith, and Lord of Ireland. 



195 



2. Statuta Antiqua. N®. 136. 

Statutum noTum do Scientiis mathematicalibus legendis, 
Statuit olim prisca patram authoritas quaestionistas nostros 
praetor lectionem ordinariam cursorie quoque ab uno baccalaureo 
dialecticam totam audituros eosdemque post posterioram in- 
troitam lectiones multiplices Bingolos quidem per seipsos exer- 
cere; atque hi rursus inceptari in artibus cursim ex uno magistro 
Aristotelis audirent philosophiam quique ubi jam primum incepe- 
rint consuetis diebos uiii,« anni singuli ordinarie legere tene- 
rentnr. Quae lectio quatriplex quoniam vel yetustate vel incuria 
jam prorsus eyasit inanis onerosa ac inutilis et quod matbematicis 
artibus jam pene periclitantibus subyenire ducimus non indignum 
has lectiones commodius transmutando statuimus quod annis 
singulis deinceps ante cessationem peritus in his artibus magister 
quispiam majoris partis refi^entium sententia dele&^atus hora post 

atque scholanbus qnos omnes baocalaureos hoc eodem decreto 
adesse coarctamus per annum primum annorum trium arithme- 
ticam et rausicam alterum geometriam et perspectiyam ter^ 
tium aatronomiam lectionibus yero a quinquagesima ad diem 
palmarum in sex hebdomadas autumni mutatis stipendium 
que ad tres anni terminos xxyi solidorum et denariorum octo 
lector ex aere publico suscipiat. Quod ne hac impensa commune 
aerarium extenuetnr et quod aequum censemus onere leyatos 
laboris mercedem saltem parem exponere debere quaestionista 
quisque cum ad respondendum quaestioni admissus fuerit prae- 
dicto lectori yiii denarios solyere teneatur bacealaureus quilibet 
die introitus Ubrorum posteriorum ii solidos singuli incepturi in 
artibus die qua eos incipere contigerit xii denarios religiosus 
quisque praeter mendicantes singulis anni ter minis similiter 
solyere debet vr denarios onere reliquo erga bedellos nihilominus 
pro consuetudine in pristine robore permanente* 



196 



IV. The Endowment of Mr. Mere. 



The Indenture between the University and the Executors of 
• John Mere, Esquire, late one of the Bedells of the said 
University, relating to his Houses given to the University. 

•This Indenture, made the first day of March, in the first year 
of the reign of our sovereign lady Elizabeth, by the grace of 
God Queen of England, France and Ireland, Defender of the 
Faith, &c. Between William Cecil, Knight, and Chancellor of 
the Uniyersity of Cambridge, and the Masters and Scholars of 
the same on the one party, and Thomas Wylson, Bachelor of 
Divinity, and John Ebden, Master of Arts, executors of the 
testament of John Mere, Esquire, late one of the Bedells of the 
said University on the other party : Witnbsseth, that where 
the said John Mere, of his good and mere benevolence towards 
^he said University, hath given to us, the said Chancellor, 
Masters and Scholars, and to our successors for ever, his two 
tenements where he dwelt, situate in the parish of Saint Benet, in 
Cambridge aforesaid, betwixt a tenement called the Cross Keys 
on the west part, and a tenement belonging to Corpus Christi 
College on the east side, the south head abutting upon the street 
leading into the market towards the east, and the north end 
Abutting upon the White Hart : and also hath given therewith 
the term of years which he hath in certain garden grounds, 
with the houses and chambers thereon builded, holden by 
indenture of John Hatcher, Doctor in Physic, late parcel of the 
Friars Augustines, lying over against his said two tenements; 
in consideration whereof we the said Chancellor, Masters and 
Scholars, for us and our successors, do covenant and grant to 
and with the said Thomas and John, executors aforesaid, for 
the testification of our kind acceptation and mindful remembrance 
of the said gift and benevolence of the said John Mere, that the 
Vice-Chancellor for the time being shall preach, or cause to be 
preached, one English sermon yearly within the church of Saint 



197 

Benet ever upon the Wednesday in the week of Easter, to be 
rung thereto at nine of the clock by the bellman of the Uni- 
versity, which shall the day before also signify the same with 
his bell through the town as the manner is, and that the said 
preacher shall hare for his pains three shillings and four*pence, 
who in his sermon shall in part, or in the whole, spend his 
matter either in exciting the auditory to the diligent and 
reverent hearing or reading of the Scripture, either in teaching 
due obedience of the subjects to their princes, and of pupils to 
their tutors, of servants to their masters, with some lesson for 
magistrates, masters and tutors, for the well ordering of their 
subjects, servants and pupils, either to exhort them to the 
relieving of the poor, in teaching again the poor their duty in 
their behaviour, either shall exhort them to the daily preparation 
of death, and not to fear death otherwise than Scripture doth 
allow. At which sermon the Vice-chancellor not making the 
sermon to have sixpence, the two Proctors either of them four- 
pence, the two Taskers either of them four-pence, the Orator four- 
pence, the two Scrutators either of them four-pence, the curate 
of the church four-pence, the four Bedells each of them four- 
pence, the bellringer four-pence, the parish-clerk two-pence, 
the Castle, Toll-booth and Spittle-house three shillings at the 
discretion of the Vice-Chancellor or in his absence of the Chap- 
lain of the University for the time being, which Chaplain for his 
pains in receiving the yearly rent and making yearly distribution 
as is aforesaid, making also his accompts with other such tenants 
belonging to the University, shall have two shillings yearly. 
And if it so chanceth that the Vice-Chancellor and other officers 
aforenamed and other officers be not present, then his and their 
portions to be bestowed the more largely upon the poor by the 
discretion of the Vice-Chancellor, or in his absence the Chaplain 
aforesaid. And furthermore, we the said Chancellor, Masters, 
and Scholars for us and our successors do grant and covenant 
to and with the said executors for ever, that in default of us 
and our successors, if the sermon aforesaid with the said 
yearly distributions be not yearly from time to time per- 
formed ever on the Wednesday in Easter week aforesaid, or 
else within the holydays of the said Easter week, that then 
it shall be lawful to the churchwardens of the said parish for the 



198 

time being to enter into the said two tenements, and there to 
distrain, and the distress so taken to sell to the levying of ten 
shillings in the name of a pain, which ten shillings they shall 
immediately distribute to the Castle, Toll-booth, and other poor, 
at their discretion : and if the tenant for the time being will 
either for the redeeming of the distress, or else will disburse the 
said ten shillings, that then the said tenant shall be allowed at 
his next pay without difficulty and without any damage or hurt 
of the said tenant for his interest of years and dwelling what- 
soerer: In witness whereof, we the said Chancellor, Masters and 
Scholars in our full congregation haye put our seal to the one 
Indenture remaining with the said executors, and after their 
departure remaining among the monuments of Corpus Christi 
College in Cambridge : and we, the said Thomas and John, haye 
put our seals to the other Indenture, remaining within the 
Common Hutch of the University aforesaid, the day and year 
aboye written. 



il 



199 



V. The Univbbsity Almshouses. 

Ecotract from the Will of Matthew Stokys, Esq., late one of the 
Bedells of the University, dated November 17, 1590. 

Item, I give and bequeath unto the Chancellor, Masters and 
Scholars of the Uniyersity of Cambridge all those my three 
Almshouses, set, lying and being in Wall's-lane in Cambridge: 
To have and to hold the said Almshouses with all and singular 
their appurtenances, and also all eyidences, writings, receipts and 
muniments concerning and belonging to the said houses, to the 
said Chancellor, Masters and Scholars, and their successors for 
ever ; Upon condition that the said three houses shall always 
remain Almshouses, and be called the University Almshouses : 
In the which I will that six poor unmarried and sole women of 
good fame, without any children or any other person to be per- 
mitted to dwell with them, and always placed at the appointment 
of the yice-Chancellor for the time being, so often as by death 
or any ill demeanor any room shall be void or vacant; and 
that every of the six poor women have made their abode and 
remained in the town of Cambridge at least six years before they 
be placed in any of the said houses, unless she %ome of my stock 
and line, and such I will to be preferred and placed before all 
others, although she hath not continued or been in the said town 
at any time before. And for the better maintenance of 
the said three poor-houses and their inhabitants, and for other 
causes moving me thereto, I will, give and bequeath unto the 
said Chancellor, Masters and Scholars, and to their successors, all 
that my lease, right, title and interest which I have in a certain 
tenement called the Chequer in Chesterton, with all and singular 
houses, barns, orchards, gardens, warehouses, grounds, meadows, 
arable lands and other the appurtenances thereto belonging, all 
lying and being in the town, fields and bounds of Chesterton, which 
I hold by lease of one Richard Braekin, late of Chesterton, gentle^ 
man. Item. I give^ will and bequeath unto the said Chancellor, 
Masters and Scholars, and to their successors, all that my lease. 



200 

righti title and interest, which I have of, in and to fifty and four 
acres of arable land and ley, lying and being in the said fields, 
bounds and limits of Chesterton. It£H. I give, will and be- 
queath unto the said Chancellor, Masters and Scholars, and their 
successors, all that my lease, right, title and interest which 
I have in and to two osier holts with certain banks of willows in 
the fields, bounds, limits and rivers of Chesterton : To havb 
HOLD AND ENJOY all and singular the said three leases, with all 
and singular their appurtenances, with all and singular rents, 
profits, evidences, writings and muniments to the same or any of 
them appertaining, in as ample and full manner as I, the said 
Matthew Stokys, did ever at any time heretofore hold and enjoy, 
or ought or might have held and enjoyed the same, during all 
the term of years yet to come in any of the said three several 
leases, upon this condition and so that the said Chancellor, 
Masters and Scholars do keep and faithfully perform all and 
singular the articles following during such time as they shall 
hold and quietly enjoy the said leases; viz. whereas the three 
several leases be at this present day rented, devised and to farm 
letten for the yearly rent of nineteen pounds above all reprises 
and in time to come after the expiration of the said years may 
be somewhat increased or fined, which may grow to the commo- 
dity of the University, I will and appoint that the said Chan- 
cellor, Masters and Scholars shall pay or cause to be paid yearly 
by the hands of their Vice-Chancellor for the time being, or his 
deputy, unto my son Robert Stokys, during his life natural, ten 
pounds of lawful money of England, to be paid unto him at the 
four usual quarter days of the year, by equal and even portions, 
the first payment to be made and to begin at the first quarter 
day that shall next follow any of the rent-days next after my 
death. Itbh. I do give and will unto the Vice- Chancellor for 
the time being, out of the said rents, for receiving of the said 
rents, for making payments and rendering account of the same, 
and other his pains yearly twenty shillings, to one appointed by 
the said Vice-Chancellor to collect the said rents yearly three 
shillings and four-pence, to the three auditors of the common 
chest, to the two Proctors and the three Esquire Bedells, to each 
of them attending upon the account, four-pence, and to the 
Register twelve-pence: The rest of the said aents and profits 



201 

coming and growing of the said three leases I will yearly to be 
put in a leather bag, and to be sealed with the seals of the 
Auditors, and to be left in the common chest of the University 
yearly, until the sum of twenty pounds of lawful money of 
England be collected and gathered, which sum of twenty pounds 
I give unto Mary Stokys, the daughter of Robert Stokys, 
towards the advancement of her marriage, or at her age of 
eighteen years, which shall first come, by the hands of the Vice- 
chancellor for the time being. Item. I will the same order in 
all points shall be kept and observed yearly after the said sum 
of twenty pounds is collected and laid up until the sum of eighty 
pounds be gathered and collected, whereof 1 give unto Elizabeth, 
Agnes, Mary and Cicely Stokys, the daughters of Matthew 
Stokys, viz. to each of them twenty pounds, to b^ paid unto 
them at the day of their marriage, or at their age of eighteen 
years : Provided always that if any of the said Elizabeth, Agnes, 
Mary and Cicely shall decease and die before they ought to 
take and enjoy this my legacy, then the survivor or survivors 
shall equally have and enjoy the part and portion or parts and 
portions of the party or parties so dead and deceased. Item. I 
will that when the said sum of eighty pounds shall be provided 
and laid up to and for the use of my said four grandchildren 
then I will that like order shall continue still until twenty pounds 
be collected, wherewith I will these my said Almshouses to be 
reared with brick and stone one floor higher six or seven foot, 
and so to be well planchered and to have tenement windows, one 
each side, and to have good and easy stairs for old and impotent 
folk, remembering that it is dedicated to God : And, that work 
being conveniently finished, I will the money rising of the said 
rents there be given weekly to every of the said poor women 
four-pence towards their meat, drink and apparel, from year to 
year, during the life of the said Robert: And when it shall 
please Ood to call to his mercy my son Robert, then I will that 
Mr. Vice-Chancellor for the time being shall yearly, at the four 
usual quarter days of the year, pay or cause to be paid unto 
Matthew Stokys and Elizabeth now his wife, and to the longer 
liver of them, for the better bringing up of their children, six 
pounds thirteen shillings and four-pence, during their life natural; 
And when it shalt please God to call to his mercy both my two 

VOL. Ill, 3 



202 

sons Matthew and Robert, and Elizabeth the now wife of my 
said son Matthew, then I will and bequeath the rents and profits 
and commodities rising and growing of my said three leases 
to the Chancellor, Masters and Scholars of the University of 
Cambridge, and to their successors, to be employed yearly 
during the continuance of the terms and years to come as followeth, 
viz. I will that the said Chancellor, Masters and Scholars shall 
yearly cause to be made within the parish-church of St Botolph 
in Cambridge upon the 12th day of March a sermon, in the 
which the preacher shall make some commendable remembrance 
of my dear father and mother, Robert and Elizabeth Stokys, 
and of me Matthew Stokys, late one of the Esquire Bedells of 
this famous University, and of Catherine and Elizabeth my 
wives, which be buried in the said church. And I will that the 
said Chancellor, Masters and Scholars shall pay or cause to be 
paid out of the said rents of the said leases to the preacher for 
his pains and labour, yearly, six shillings and eight pence, 
to Mr. yice-Chancellor, if he be present and do not preach, six- 
pence, to the Orator, two Proctors, Two Taxors, two Scrutators, 
four Bedells, the curate, two churchwardens, the University bell- 
ringer, the clerk of the church, the poor six almswomen, and to 
one making this distribution of these payments, every of these 
being present, four-pence, to the prisoners in the Castle, to the 
prisoners in the ToUbooth^ to the poor in the Spittle, to each 
place twelve-pence, and to the poor of the parish over and beside 
that that shall remain of such as shall be absent, which I will to 
be given to the said poor, and also so much more as shall make 
up in the whole twenty shillings. Itbm. I will that Mr. Vice- 
Chancellor for the time being shall pay or cause to be paid 
weekly during the continuance of the said leases to every of the 
said poor women seven-pence, which amounteth in the year to 
nine pounds two shillings. Itbh. I will that the said Yice- 
Chancellor shall yearly, for two years together, give unto every 
of the said poor women at Sturbridge Fair, to buy them frieze 
gowns and linen veils, eight shillings, which amounteth unto forty- 
eight shillings yearly, which I will them and every of them to 
be bound unto the said Yice-Chancellor both to make and to 
wear, and to leave unto their successors, if they shall fortune to 
die within the year : And in that attire and apparel 1 will the 



203 

said poor women to frequent their parish-churches upon the high 
feasts of the year, and to be put on at my commemoration, and 
at some convenient day and time to shew themselyes to Mr. 
Vice-Chancellor yearly, after he shall be admitted : And I will 
that every third year the said forty-eight shillings shall be 
bestowed upon the reparations of the said houses and walls, and 
this order to be kept during the continuance of the whole lease. 
Item. I will that out of the rents of the said leases yearly the 
Vice-Chancellor shall yearly have and take for his pains in 
receiving the said rents and laying out the same, and for making 
an account, twenty shillings, and pay at the general account of 
the common chest unto himself and three other auditors, to each 
four-pence, to the two Proctors, two Scrutators, and to the 
three Bedells, to each four-pence, and to the Register twelve- 
pence, and to him that coUecteth and accounteth for the rents 
three shillings and four-pence ; the sum is twelve shillings and 
eight pence (sic) ; The rest of all the rents and other commodi- 
ties rising of the said three leases I give unto the Chancellor, 
Masters and Scholars, during the continuance of the same, upon 
condition that if my land or houses or any part thereof shall 
descend and come unto any of the Colleges in manner as is 
before-mentioned, then the University shall give unto every of 
the said Scholars, when he or they shall proceed Bachelors of 
Arts, thirteen shillings and four-pence a-piece, and when he or 
they shall proceed Masters of Arts, twenty shillings a-piece 
towards his or their commencement respectively. 



-2 



204 



VI. Hobson's Workhouse Charity. 

By Indenture of feoffment, dated 30 July 1628, with livery of 
seisin indorsed, inroUed in Chancery, made between Thomas 
Hobson of the one part, and five persons described as privileged 
of the University of Cambridge, and named by the then Vice- 
Chancellor, and six other persons described as of the Town of 
Cambridge, and named by the then Mayor, of the other part, in 
acknowledgment of God's mercies and blessings upon his labours, 
and in testimony of his earnest and fervent wish to do good to 
the poor of the University and Town, and to the intent that the 
poor part of the said University and Town, wanting means to 
Eve upon and settle themselves in some honest calling, might 
thereafter be employed and set to work, and brought up and 
instructed in some trade or occupation, and thereby not only 
enabled to live of themselves, but by their labours become 
profitable members of the commonwealth, and helpful to others 
among whom they should live ; and in consideration that there 
were then at the only care, costs and charges of the Chancellor, 
Masters and Scholars of the University, and the Mayor, Bailiffs 
and Burgesses, in a great part erected and builded upon the 
property included in the said Indenture divers buildings and 
houses intended only for the benefit and employment of the 
poorer sort of people of the said University and Town, the said 
Thomas Hobson conveyed unto the parties of the second part 
and their heirs a messuage and tenement, dove-house and site of 
a dove-house, a barn, and all houses and edifices then built upon 
the farms, gardens, curtilages, courts and grounds thereto 
belonging, with all their appurtenances, in the parish of St. An- 
drew without Barnwell-gate in Cambridge : Upon trust, that 
they, their heirs and assigns, with the assistance of the Chancellor, 
Masters and Scholars of the University, and the Mayor, Bailiffs 
and Burgesses of the Town, and their successors respectively, 
should within the space of four years build, erect and finish one 
or more convenient. house or houses upon the premises, as well 
for settmg the poor people of the said University and Town to 



205 

work, as for an house of correction for unruly and stubborn 
rogues, beggars and other poor persons who should refuse to 
work; and also in conrenient time should provide a sufficient 
stock of wool and flax and other materials for setting of the said 
poor people of the said University and Town to work, and should 
from time to time thereafter, well and sufficiently maintain and 
repair the said houses to be by them erected, and all other the 
premises, and so of the same and every part thereof; and all 
rents and profits arising from the same for and towards the 
uses aforesaid ; with a clause of re-entry to the grantor and his 
heirs in case of mis-employment of the premises, and a pro- 
vision that, so often as it should happen that any eight of the 
Trustees should die, then within the space of five months the 
survivors should, upon request of the University and Corpora- 
tion, or either of them, or of the Vice-Chancellor and Mayor for 
the time being, or of either of them, and at the costs and charges 
of the University and Corporation, convey the premises to twelve 
other persons and their heirs, six whereof to be named by the 
University or Vioe-Chancellor for the time being, and the other 
six by the Corporation or Mayor for the time being, only upon 
the same trusts. 

By a codicil made to his Will, dated January 1, 1630, Thomas 
Hobson gave to the Mayor, Bailiffs and Burgesses the sum of 
«^100, to the intent that they should within a convenient time 
purchase lands or tenements therewith, the rents thereof yearly 
arising to be employed and bestowed towards the maintenance 
of the house of correction and workhouse within the Town of 
Cambridge, and of the poor which should be set on work there 
for ever. 

The Charity was afterwards increased by part of the pro- 
duce of a collection made at Cambridge by voluntary contribu- 
tions, in pursuance of the King's Letters Patent, for the relief of 
the poor there during a pestilence which occurred about the 
year 1631; and it has been further increased by additional 
benefactions from time to time by other persons. 

John Bowtell by Will, dated September 22, 1813, gave to 
the Trustees of the workhouse in Cambridge, established by 
Thomas Hobson, the sum of £500 stock, 3 per cent. Bank 
Annuities, to the intent that the interest and dividends thereof 



206 

should for ever be laid out and applied by the Trustees for the 
time being of the said workhouse, towards placing out poor boys, 
natires of the Town of Cambridge, as apprentices to learn some 
useful art, thereby to enable them to gain a comfortable living. 

The following scheme for the future management of the 
affairs of the Charity was approved by the Court of Chancery, 
August 4, 1852 : — 



As to the application of the Spinning-House and Premises 

in Cambridge. 

1. That so much of the Spinning-house and adjacent pre- 
mises, as is uncoloured in the plan thereof marked A, signed by 
Orlando Hyde and Charles Henry Cooper (as solicitors for the 
Chancellor, Masters and Scholars of the University, and Mayor, 
Aldermen and Burgesses of the Town of Cambridge respectively:) 
being the two north wards and part of the next adjoining ward, 
to be divided off by transferring the centre wall about nine feet 
in a parallel direction towards the south, together also with the 
infirmary and open grounds about it, and the dwelling occupied 
by the governor, and the tenement lately occupied by Mrs. Harris, 
(except so much of the latter as will be cut off by the wall to be 
erected at the distance of six feet from the northern wall of the 
kitchen, as after-mentioned) shall be deemed the University 
portion of the Spinning-house, to be used by the said Chan- 
cellor, Masters and Scholars as a house of correction, for the 
reception and confinement of common women and prostitutes 
apprehended by the Proctors of the said University, or com- 
mitted thereto by the Vice-Chancellor of the said University, in 
exercise of the powers and according to the usage and practice 
now lawfully exercised, used, and practised in that behalf. 

2. That the University governors, hereinafter mentioned, 
shall have the exclusive management of the University portion 
of the Spinning-house, and the exclusive appointment of all 
officers and servants to be therein employed. 

8. That so much of the Spinning-house and adjacent pre- 
mises, as is in the same plan coloured red, being the south ward 
and the rest of the adjoining ward divided, as above mentioned. 



I 



207 

and the kitchen, together with the part above described as 
excepted from the tenement lately occupied by Mrs. Harris, and 
also the premises on the same plan coloured blue, being the 
premises demised to John Bowles, shall be deemed the Town 
portion of the Spinning-house, to be used by the said Mayor, 
Aldermen and Burgesses, as a lock-up house and police station. 

4. That the said Mayor, Aldermen and Burgesses shall (by 
the watch-committee of the said borough for the time being) 
have the exclusive management of the Town portion of the 
Spinning-house, and the exclusive appointment of all officers and 
servants to be therein employed. 

5. That the said Mayor, Aldermen and Burgesses shall, at 
their own cost, pull down the two walls, which in the said plan 
are marked with the words "this wall to be pulled down," and 
" this wall to be removed southward nine feet," they being 
entitled to use the materials of such last-mentioned walls : and 
that the said Mayor, Aldermen, and Burgesses shall also, at their 
own costs, erect and for ever maintain a good and substantial 
brick wall, of the height of 14 feet 6 inches at the least, at the 
place in the said plan indicated by the words " site of wall to be 
erected for partitioning Police Station :" (such last-mentioned 
wall to be erected through the whole length of the Town portion 
of the said Spinning-house, so as effectually to separate the same 
from the University portion thereof) and also another substantial 
brick wall, for the purpose of dividing that part of the tenement 
lately occupied by Mrs. Harris, which is intended to be included 
in the Town portion of the said Spinning-house, from the other 
part thereof, intended to be included in the University portion 
thereof. 

6. That the said Mayor, Aldermen and Burgesses shall not 
be entitled to the possession of so much of the said Spinning- 
house and premises, as is in the said plan thereof coloured blue, 
until the expiration of the lease thereof made to John Bowles 
by Indenture dated 14th April 1831, unless they, in the mean- 
time, at their own cost, purchase the interest of the lessee in the 
said premises, and procure, at their own costs and charges, a 
surrender of the said lease to the trustees of the Charity. 

7. That the said Chancellor, Masters and Scholars, and the 
sidd Mayor, Aldermen and Burgesses, may respectively, at their 



208 

respective costs and charges, alter and amend the internal 
construction and arrangement of their respective portions of the 
said Spinning-house, so as the better to adapt them for the uses 
and purposes to which they are to be respectively applied, as 
often and in such manner, as the University governors and Town 
governors shall respectively deem necessary or desirable. 

8. That the University and Town portions of the Spinning- 
house, as herein described, or as the same respectively may 
from time to time be altered or amended, shall at all times here- 
after be severally kept in good order, condition and repair, and 
also adequately insured in the names of the Trustees of the said 
Charity against loss or damage by fire by the said Chancellor, 
Masters and Scholars, and Mayor, Aldermen and Burgesses 
respectively, at their own costs and charges, who shall also, at 
their like costs and charges, bear and pay all rates, taxes and 
impositions charged upon or in respect thereof, they being 
allowed from the income of the said Charity the several annual 
sums, hereinafter mentioned, for or on account of the costs and 
charges to be incurred in this behalf. 

As to the Trustees of the Charity, 

9. That all the estates of the Charity shall be vested in 
twelve persons as trustees upon trust, as to the said Spinning- 
house and adjacent premises in Cambridge, to permit and suffer 
the respective portions thereof, hereinbefore particularly men- 
tioned, to be used for the several purposes hereinbefore expressed 
concerning the same premises respectively, and as to all other 
the said estates upon trust to demise or let the same, to such 
persons, for such terms, and subject to such rents, as shall be 
determined upon and directed by the governors of the said 
Charity for the time being, the rents and income of such estates 
being received by the treasurer of the said Charity for the time 
being, to be by him applied, as hereinafter mentioned, under 
the direction and control of the said governors. 

10. That when the number of the trustees resident in or 
within seven miles of Cambridge shall be reduced to four, the 
said Charity estates shall be conveyed upon the same trusts to 
twelve persons, as new trustees, of whom six shall be appointed 



209 

by Grace of the Senate of the University of Cambridge, and six 
shall be appointed by the Council of the Borough of Cambridge, 
but any of such four resident trustees shall be eligible to be 
again appointed a trustee. 

11. That any governor may also be appointed a trustee, 
and that any trustee may also be appointed a governor. 

12. That the governors shall from time to time, out of the 
rents and income of the Charity estates, keep harmless and 
indemnify the trustees from all costs, charges and expenses to 
which they may be subjected, as Trustees, by reason of any act 
done in their name, under the direction, or with the sanction 
and approbation of the governors. 

As to the Governors of the Charity. 

13. That the general management of the affairs of the said 
Charity shall be vested in fourteen governors, whereof seven 
shall be deemed University governors, and the other seven shall 
be deemed Town governors. 

14. That the University governors shall be the Vice-Chan- 
cellor of the University of Cambridge for the time being, and 
six other members of the Senate ; all or any of them to be 
appointed and removed from time to time by Grace of the 
Senate. 

15. That the Town governors shall be the Mayor of the 
Borough of Cambridge for the time being, and six other members 
of the Council of the said Borough, to be appointed in the first 
year, as soon as conveniently may be, by the said Council for 
the residue of that year; and thereafter annually by the said 
Council on the 1st day of January (except in any year in which 
that day shall happen to be Sunday, in which year such appoint- 
ment shall be made on the day then next following). 

16. That if in any year any of the said six members of the 
Council appointed Town governors for that year shall die, or cease 
to be a member of such Council, the said Council may from time 
to time supply the vacancy so created for the residue of such 
year. 

17. That at all meetings of the University governors only 
the Vice-ChanceUor of the said University, if present, shall preside 



210 

as chairman, and that any four of sach governors shall be com- 
petent to act. 

18. That at all meetings of the Town gorernors only the 
Mayor of the said Borough, if present, shall preside as chairman, 
and that any four of such governors shall be competent to act. 

19. That at all general meetings of the governors in 1852, 
and every alternate year thereafter, the yice-Chancellor of the 
said University, if present, shall preside as chairman, and that, 
if the Yice-Chancellor be not present, the Mayor, if present, 
shall so preside. 

20. That at all general meetings of the governors in 1853, 
and every alternate year thereafter, the Mayor of the said 
Borough, if present, shall preside as chairman, and that, if the 
Mayor be not present, the Yice-Chancellor, if present, shall so 
preside. 

21. That at all general meetings of the governors nine shall 
be competent to act. 

22. That at all meetings, whether of the University gover- 
nors only, or of the Town governors only, and at all general 
meetings of the governors, every question shall be decided by 
the majority of the votes of the governors present ; the chair- 
man, in every case in which there shall be an equality of votes, 
having a second or casting voice; and that, when there is no 
governor present, who, according to the preceding regulations, 
is entitled to preside as chairman of the meeting, the governors 
present shall appoint one of themselves to take the chair at such 
meeting. 

As to the Clerk and Treasurer of the Charity. 

23. The governors of the said Charity shall from time to 
time appoint a fit and proper person to be clerk and treasurer 
of the said Charity, and he shall hold those offices at the 
pleasure of the governors of the said Charity, and shall receive 
such salary and allowances for his services therein, as the 
governors of the said charity may from time to time direct, not 
exceeding £25 per annum. 

24. That no trustee or governor shall be eligible as clerk 
and treasurer, and no clerk and treasurer shall be eligible as 
trustee or governor. 



211 

25. The said clerk and treasurer shall give a bond, with a 
sufficient surety or sufficient sureties, to the Trustees of the said 
Charity, their executors, and administrators, in a competent 
penal sum, conditioned for the due performance of the duties of 
the said offices, and the goTornors shall from time to time fix 
the amount of the said penal sum, and decide as to the sufficiency 
of the surety or sureties proposed, and they shall direct with 
whom such bond shall be deposited for safe custody, and such 
bond shall be put in suit as and when the goyernors shall from 
time to time direct, and not otherwise. 

26. That all other documents relating to the Charity and its 
estates and affairs shall be safely and securely kept by the said 
clerk and treasurer in such place as the governors may from 
time to time direct, and subject to such regulations as the said 
goyernors may from time to time think proper to make. 



As to Leases of the Estates of the Charity. 

27. That no estate of the Charity shall be demised for any 
life or liyes, or for any term exceeding 21 years. 

28. That no lease of any estate of the Charity shall be 
made whilst any other lease of such estate shall be in being, 
except such last-mentioned lease shall be within one year of 
expiration. 

29. That no fine, premium, or foregift shall be taken on the 
lease of any of the Charity estates. 

30. That in eyery lease of the Charity estates the true 
and fair annual money value of such estate shall be reserved as 
the rent thereof (except only in those cases where the lessee 
shall covenant to lay out in building upon or otherwise improving 
the estate demised a sum sufficient to compensate for any 
reduction of rent below such annual value), and in all eases the 
rent shall be reserved half-yearly or oftener. 

31. That every lease of the Charity estates shall be made 
by the trustees, and shall be prepared by the clerk and 
treasurer, who shall, without any additional charge to the Charity, 
fairly copy the same in a register book to be provided for that 
purpose. 



212 

32. That in all cases (except those in which the Lease shall 
be deposited with the clerk and treasurer for the mutual use of 
the lessors and lessee) a counterpart of the lease shall be executed 
by the lessee, and kept by the clerk and treasurer. 

As to the application of the Rents and Income of the Estates 

of the Charity. 

33. That the following sums shall be annually paid out of the 
ren ts and income of the Charity estates, viz. 

To the University governors towards pay- 
ment of the salaries of the officers and 
servants employed in the University 
portion of the said Spinning-house and 
the expenses of the repairs of the Uni- 
versity portion of the said Spinning- 
house, and the rates and taxes there- 
upon imposed and the insurance thereof £75 

To the said Mayor, Aldermen and Burgesses 
towards payment of the salaries of the 
officers and servants employed in the 
Town portion of the said Spinning-house 
and the expenses of the repairs of the 
Town portion of the said Spinning-house, 
and the rates and taxes thereupon im- 
posed and the insurance thereof £75 

To the clerk and treasurer of the said 
Charity for his salary and allowances 
such sum as the governors of the said 
Charity shall from time to time direct, • 

not being more than £25 

To the University governors £15, and to 
the Town governors £15, towards put- 
ting out poor boys natives of the town 
of Cambridge as apprentices to some 
useful art, thereby to enable them to 
gain a comfortable living (as by the 
Will of Mr. John Bowtell is directed) 
making together £30 



213 

34. That the residue of the said rents and income, after 
payment thereout of the said several annual sums hereinbefore 
mentioned, shall be applied in donations to schools (including 
industrial schools) for the education of poor boys and girls 
within the limits of the University and Borough of Cambridge, 
or in any contiguous parish, where children of poor persons 
residing within the said limits are educated, or in apprenticing 
poor boys and girls children of such poor persons to some trade 
or occupation, and that one-half of such residue shall be so 
applied in such way and manner as the University governors 
only shall from time to time in that behalf direct, and the other 
half thereof shall be so applied in such way and manner as the 
Town governors only shall from time to time in that behalf direct, 
and that each of the said bodies of governors respectively shall 
keep minutes of the mode in which such half has been so 
applied by them respectively. 

As to the Treasurer's Accounts. 

35. That the treasurer shall keep just and true accounts of 
all his receipts and payments in respect of the Charity, and that 
such accounts shall be fairly entered by him in a book or books 
to be provided for that purpose. 

36. That the governors shall hold a general meeting in the 
month of February yearly, in order that they may then audit 
the accounts of the treasurer up to the 29 th day of September 
then next preceding, and that at such meeting the treasurer shall 
produce to the governors proper vouchers for the several pay- 
ments charged by him in his accounts, and all deeds and other 
papers relative to the Charity which the governors may require. 

37. That within 14 days after the audit, the treasurer shall 
send a copy of his accounts so audited to the registrary of the 
said University, to be by him preserved amongst the records 
thereof, and another copy of such accounts so audited to the 
town-clerk of the said Borough, to be by him preserved amongst 
the records thereof. 

As to Apprentices, 

38. That one poor boy, at least, shall be apprenticed in 
every year by the University Governors, and one, at least, in 



214 

every year by the Town Governors, out of the annual sums 
to be paid to them respectively, as hereinbefore is mentioned, in 
satisfaction of the benefaction of the said John Bowtell. 

39. That every such poor boy, to be apprenticed by the said 
governors respectively from the benefaction of the said John 
Bowtell, shall produce evidence, satisfactory to the respective 
governors, of his being a native of the town of Cambridge. 

40. That no poor boy or girl, to be apprenticed in pursuance 
of this scheme, shall be bound apprentice for a less term than 
four years. 

41. That the indenture of apprenticeship shall be prepared 
by the clerk and treasurer at the cost of the apprenticeship fundi 
and such indenture shall be kept by such clerk and treasurer 
during the apprenticeship for the inspection and use, as well of 
the respective governors, as of the said master and apprentice. 

42. That the trustees shall be parties to such indenture, and 
that the master of such apprentice shall, in addition to the usual 
covenants in such cases, also covenant with the said trustees, 
that he will return the premium, or an adequate part thereof, 
in case of the non-performance of his covenants or any of them, 
with a stipulation that the decision of the respective governors 
for the time being, to be come to and recorded in the usual way 
at some meeting thereof, shall be conclusive evidence as to the 
fact of non-performance of his covenants, and as to the amount 
of premium which ought to be returned, or damage sustained by 
such non-performance, and such covenant shall be put in suit as 
and when the respective governors shall from time to time direct, 
and not otherwise. 



216 



VII. Endowments of Mr. Gbanb. 

Extracts from Mr. Cranes Will, dated June 26, 1651. 

{Proved at London June 23^ 1652). 

Itbh. I give to the Uniyersity of Cambridge my house and 
gallery, Trherein I now live, with my stable in Cutler's or 
Sherer's Lane, now in my own hand, for the Physic Professor 
to live in or let, so long as he holds the Professor's place ; provided 
that he let nor lease it for a longer time than he hold the 
Physic Professor's place : he putting in security to the University 
or the other Professors of Divinity and Law to keep in good 
repair, to maintain, re-edify and so to keep it during all his time; 
and after his decease, or giving over his place, to the next 
Professor in Physic all the same freely, and so to succeed from 
one Professor to another in Physic for ever freely. This I do 
for that I have known some Physic Professors to want houses to 
dwell in but have been put to dwell in mean houses. 

• ••.«••• 

Item. Whereas I have appointed and required and do earnestly 
desire my Executors to buy threescore pounds a-year of good 
lands or tenements, so as the tenants may have a good penny- 
worth to pay willingly their rent, but I desire it may be three- 
score and two pounds a year, which I bestow freely and willingly 
in manner and form following ; And I desire my Executors to 
take good care in the settling it in good honest men's hands 
and able men as feofifers in trust or as they shall think safest to 
be bestowed. I think Wisbech men very safe, the ten men cor- 
porate of Wisbech, or as my Executors shall think best ; the use 
as follows ; The first year's rent being threescore pounds a-year 
I give te the University of Cambridge, to be given to poor 
scholars for their relief that are sick for paying for their physic, 
diet or other things necessary for them in their sickness, knowing 
many heretofore have miscarried for want of means to relieve 
them. This to be bestowed by the present yice-Chancellor, the 



216 

three Professors of Divinity, Civil Law and Physic, and the 
chief Apothecary in the town, for that he knows the need of 
most of the poor scholars in that case, desiring the Master of 
Caius College to join with them to assist them ; this comes but 
once in five years to the University. The second year's revenue 
I give to the town of Wisbech^ being threescore pounds, to be lent 
freely to three young men to help to set them up, they putting in 
good security to repay it at the twenty years' end to the ten men 
or others in trust at the twenty years' end ; and that then it be 
lent to three other young men in like order, they putting in good 
security to repay it at twenty years' end, and this twenty pounds 
and so every twenty pounds to be shifted from one man to ano- 
ther at the expiration of twenty years, and this gift to continue 
until there be two hundred pounds stock to be lent to them 
as above, it coming to them but every fifth year. Threescore 
pounds, the third year's revenue, I give to the town of Cambridge 
to be lent to three young men towards the setting them up, twenty 
pounds a man freely for twenty years, and this to be disposed 
by the Vice-Chancellor for the time being, the three University 
Professors of Divinity, Law and Physic, and chief Apothecary, 
the Mayor for the time beings the Becorder and three Aldermen, 
or the greatest part of them, whereof I appoint two of them shall 
have the money to be privileged persons, and the third a townsman, 
they putting in good security to repay it at the twenty years^ 
end, and then the parties entrusted to lend that twenty pounds 
to another young man for the like time, upon the like conditions; 
and this to continue till the town hath two hundred pounds stock 
to lend to ten young men towards setting them up, never letting 
one man enjoy the twenty pounds longer than the twenty years. 
The fourth year's revenue I give to the town corporate of King's 
Lynn in Norfolk, there to be lent to three young men in like 
order as Wisbech and Cambridge doth ; this to be lent by the 
Mayor of King's Lynn for the time being, the Recorder and 
four of the chief Aldermen, the revenue being twenty pounds a 
man. The fifth year's revenue I give to the town corporate of 
Ipswich, being the town wherein Mr. Butler of famous memory 
was born, and so my own father, and this to continue until the 
town hath two hundred pounds stock, threescore pounds a-year 
coming in every fifth year ; this to be disposed and lent by the 



217 

• 

two Bailiffs of Ipswich, the Recorder and four of the chief men 
in that body, they taking good security for every twenty pounds 
so lent in like order as Wisbech doth; evory town haying two 
hundred pounds stock to be lent freely for twenty years, and 
shifted to new parties every twenty years. But the University 
to have their threescore pounds every fifth year, to be bestowed 
as at first. My intent and meaning is that the threescore pounds 
a-year shall continue to every town afterwards every fifth year, 
but the use changed, that is, as it falls out to come to every 
town, instead of lending it to young men or other as before 
expressed, that, viz. this threescore pounds a-year to be given 
and bestowed upon honest poor men that be imprisoned for debt, 
or old women, or the relief of poor men in want, or to relieve 
them out of prison for debt, desiring them intrusted in this 
business, as they will answer it before God, that they relieve the 
most honest, godliest and religious men and women in the said 
several towns, that have lived well and had a good report, being 
fallen in decay by some extraordinary occasion, and not to give 
it to dissembling and hypocritical persons. 

A Codicil, dated Sept. 20, 1651, contains the following 
passage: 

Item. My meaning is, that if any of them intrusted to lend 
this twenty pounds a-piece to divers men be so careless in doing 
thereof as they lose the one-half of the former two hundred 
pounds, that then the other towns formerly bequeathed the like 
shall have the whole iproit of this my gift bestowed on them for 
the use of the poor in those towns, and that town so careless to 
have no more. Item. I do give forty shillings to every town 
where this money is to be bestowed, to have a sermon that year 
to invite other men to^o the like. And if there shall chance any 
Act to be made to avoid any such gift to any town and to alter 
it, then I give the former land so purchased to my cousin Master 
William Crane, his son Frank Crane, and so to go along to him 
and them as I have given my manor of Kingston Wood and Kings-* 
ton St George and the rest of my lands every way. Item. Whereas 
I have devised my Executors to buy threescore and two pounds 
a-year for the use of the poor, to lend twenty pounds a-piece to 
honest young men twenty years freely, I will that this continue 

VOL. III. 4 



-« / »• 



■'<! 



218 

till every town baye two hundred pounds a-piece to lend ten 
men, and after that the threescore pounds shall go to the use of 
the poor, as in this my last Will is set down before. 



The house and premises devised by Mr. Crane for the use of 
the Regius Professor of Physic were required and used in the 
year 1724 for the purposes of building the Senate House and of 
making the improvements consequent thereon, power having been 
given to the Eegius Professor by the Act (6 Geo. I.) which 
authorized those improvements, enabling him to convey to the 
University for those purposes : and m exchange for the said house 
and premises the property in Market Street, now constituting 
Mr. Crane^s endowment, was conveyed at the same time by the 
University, with the concurrence of Dr. Green, the then Regius 
Professor, to Sir Thomas Hatton and three other persons in trust 
for the Professors of Physic. 

No new Trustees having been appointed since the time of the 
said exchange and conveyance, and it having become uncertain 
upon whom the trust estate had legally devolved, it was ordered 
by the Court of Chancery, July 13, 1853, upon petition of the 
Chancellor, Mastein^and Scholars of the University and of the 
Eegius Professor of Physic jointly. That the Chancellor, Masters 
and Scholars of the University of Cambridge be appointed new 
Trustees of the messuage, hereditaments and premises situate in 
Market Street in the town of Cambridge in the petition men- 
tioned, in place of Sir Thomas Hatton, Bart., Sir John Hinde 
Cotton, Bart., Francis Pemberton and Samuel Gatward, in the 
petition named, all since deceased ; And it is ordered that the 
estate and interest of the said Sir Thomas Hatton, Sir John 
Hinde Cotton, Francis Pemberton and Samuel Gatward, in the 
aid messuage, estate and premises, rest in the said Chancellor, 
Masters and Scholars of the University of Cambridge upon the 
trusts expressed in the Will of John Crane in the petition named 
concerning the messuage and hereditaments thereby devised 
for the benefit of the Regius Professor of Physic in the said 
University. 



i 



< 



219 



VIII. Me. Rustat's Donation to the Library, 

Tlie Instrument and Declaration of Mr. Tobias Rustaty to 
what purpose he gave the sum of <f 1000 to the University. 

I, Tobias Rdstat, Yeoman of the Robes to his most sacred Majesty 
King Charles the Second, being really sensible of the infinite 
goodness of God, by whose especial favor and blessing upon me 
(in his Majesty ^s, my most gracious Master's miraculous Restora^^ 
tion) I have obtained a comfortable Estate, and calling to mind 
that an obligation lies upon me to be therefore truly thankful to 
the Divine Majesty, I have resolved to express the same in 
freely giving some part of what I have received towards the 
advancement of the true religion now established in this Realm, 
good learning and the honour of God: to which end I have 
given and delivered in to the Chancellor, Masters and Scholars 
of the University of Cambridge the sum of <f 1000, the receipt 
whereof is acknowledged by their writing to these presents an* 
nexed under their common seal, to be by them or their succes- 
sors disposed and bestowed to the uses and purposes and 
according to the order and directions hereinafter by me declared, 
and not otherwise : that is to say ; first, I order and direct that 
the said sum of £1000 be laid out within three years at furthest, 
and as much sooner as may conveniently be, in the purchase of 
Lands of £50 or £60 per annum value, or such yearly value as 
the said <£1000 shall extend to purchase, of a good title and 
clear of incumbrances. That the said purchase be made with 
and by the approbation and good liking of me and my counsel 
or the approbation and good liking of my Executors or Adminis- 
trators and their counsel. And the Lands so purchased to be 
legally settled upon the said Chancellor, Masters and Scholars of 
the said University and their successors for ever, or in some 
others in trust for them, as by my counsel or the eounsel of my 
Executors or Administrators shall be thought most convenient. 
And if before the end of three years from the date of these 
presents the ssdd £1000 be not employed upon a purchase of 
Land, as is before expressed, then and in that case the ssud 

4—2 



220 

£1000 to be repaid to me, my Executors, Administrators or 
Assigns upon demand. Secondly, I order and direct that the 
profits and revenues of such Lands to be so purchased, as soon 
as the same shall be so purchased and settled, and the proceeds 
of the said £1000 which is to be disposed of at legal interest by 
the privity of me the said Tobias Bustat and of my counsel or 
the counsel of my Executors or Administrators in such hands 
as I or they shall approve of, until such purchase of Lands be 
made (but the said Chancellor, Masters and Scholars, or their 
successors, not to answer for any miscarriage thereof, being so 
disposed by such approbation) shall yearly for every year be 
expended in the buying the choicest and most useful Books for 
the public Library of the said University. And to the end this 
gift may become more advantageous to the general studies of all 
Arts and Sciences, and that the best and most useful Books may 
be bought by good advice, I appoint that the said Books shall 
be yearly bought (as the revenues aforesaid come in and shall 
be received) by the advice and consent of the Vice-Chancellor of 
the said University for the time being, the Provost of King's 
College in Cambridge for the time being, the Master of 
Trinity College in Cambridge for the time being, and the 
Master of Saint John's College in Cambridge for the time 
being, all the public Professors of Divinity, Law and Phy- 
sic in the said University for the time being, the public 
Professors of the Mathematics in the ssdd University for the 
time being, and the public Professors of the Greek and Oriental 
tongues in the said University for the time being, or by the 
advice and consent of any five or more of them or the major 
part of them, all being summoned to a meetmg appointed for 
that effect by the Vice-Chancellor : of which receipt and expense 
of the profits and monies aforesaid the Vice-Chancellor of the 
said University for the time being shall give in then and there 
an account as he doth of other the revenues belonging to the 
said University at the University audit yearly, producing the 
receipts of the Booksellers for his acquittance of such monies as 
shall have been laid out, Thirdly, I order and direct that the 
Books bought with such advice and consent as siforesaid shall 
be substantially bound up alike in the same form and manner, and 
desire that they may be placed together by themselves in a 



221 

place set apart for that purpose in the public Library of the 
said nniyersity, and that no person shall upon any pretence 
whatsoeyer be admitted to borrow and carry out of the aforesaid 
Library any Book or Books that shall have the impression of 
my Arms upon it or them ; and that a fair Book of vellum be 
prepared for the registering therein the names of all the Books 
bought by this benefaction from time to time and no other. 
And lastly I declare that the reason whereby I have been in^ 
duced to dispose this gift to the use herein expressed is upon 
hopes that thereby the said Library may be in process of time 
supplied with all sorts of learned authors^ which may render the 
same useful to all persons (as well the poor as the rich) who 
shall dedicate themselves to the studies of any kind of good 
literature within the said University , and may thereby also in- 
crease the honor and fame of the siud University and this 
Nation. 

Dated, A. D. 1666. 



222 



IX. Ladt Sadler's Endowhbni;:^ for Alobbra Lecturers. 

Extracted from the Registry of the Prerogative Court 

of Canterbury. 

In the Will of Damb Mart Sablbir, (Wife of Sir Edwins 
Sadlbir, Baronet,) deceased, dated 25th September, 1701, 
is as follows : — 

And my further will b that my debts by mo owing at the time 
of my decease and my funeral charges, and the legacies hereby 
or hereinbefore by me devised or bequeathed, shall be first paid 
and satisfied by my said Executors before any of the Algebra 
Lectures, College of Physicians, or Royal Society at Gresham 
College Lectures be settled on them or any of them, notwith- 
standing the time or times hereinbefore for that purpose men- 
tioned, limited, or appointed for settling the same* And whereas 
my good friend, Mr. William Bous, one of my Executors here- 
inbefore named, hath as my Trustee acted and transacted several 
great concerns for me and in my Estate, I do hereby declare 
that all accounts are settled and evened between us to this day. 
And therefore I do hereby, for me, my Executors and Adminis- 
trators, remise, release, and for ever quit and acquit him, hb 
executors or adoiinistrators of and from all manner of action or 
actions, cause or causes of actions, claims, demands, and accounts 
whatsoever which I now have or hereafter may or can have 
against him or them from the beginning of the world to the 
date of this my last Will. And I do hereby heartily and really 
thank him for his great trouble, care, and pains he hath had 
from and by me herein. And lastly, for that whereas in this 
my Will aforementioned I have directed and appointed several 
Lectures of Algebra to be erected in the University of Cambridge; 
and I have given to and for their maintenance my Manor, 
Lands, and Woods at Eimpson, in the county of Southampton ; 
as also my moiety of Netham Tithes and Copyhold Estate at 
Pilehill, both also in the said County of Southampton ; and my 
Tavern known by the name of the Globe b Little Eastcheape, 



223 

London ; and for that whereas I have given and bequeathed 
several annuities for lives to be paid out of the said Manors of 
Eimpson and also the said Globe Tavern for the life of my said 
husband Sir Edwine Sadleir, which may for some time hinder 
the aforesaid Lectures to that number that hereafter when the 
lives are extinct and dead the said Estate may be able to main* 
tain, and considering that before all the said lives may be 
expired my said Executors may be all dead, and likewise to 
prevent long trouble to my Executors and also further charge to 
my Estate by the necessity in case of death of the survivors 
nominating new Trustees; therefore I desire my Executors 
(any thing in this my Will to the contrary notwithstanding) or 
any two of them, if one shall be dead, at the expiration of the 
eighteen months aforementioned in this my Will after my 
decease, for the beginning of the setting up of some of the said 
Algebra Lectures, to erect or cause to be erected so many Lec- 
tures on such Colleges as they shall see fitting for the present, 
which being done I then desire them to settle the several Estates 
before given on such persons or Heads of Colleges and their 
successors as they shall on diligent inquiry think best for the 
future performance and perfecting my said intention. And they 
to whom the said Estates shall be conveyed unto are desired to 
increase the number of the said Lectures as the lives shall happen 
to die and be extinct. And my earnest request and desire is 
that those persons to whom these Estates shall be conveyed do 
punctually and without trouble pay the annuities to the several 
persons to whom I have devised the same, free from all charges 
and taxes or other abatements or incumbrances whatsoever. 

The first Schedule annexed to the said Will is as follows: — 

The Instrument mentioned in the Will of me. Dame Mary 
Sadlbir, the Relict of Dr. William Cronne and Daughter 
of John Lorimer, Esq. deceased, Alderman of the City of 
London, for the settling of the Algebra Lectures on several 
Colleges in the University of Cambridge. 

The true intent and meaning of these Lectures are for the 
full and clear explication and teaching that part of Mathematical 
knowledge commonly called Algebra, or the method or rule of 
contemplating quantities general with particular application and 



224 

use of it in Arithmetic and Geometry, either according to the 
method of Des Cartes or any other of those who have best im- 
proved it since. 

The persons to read the said Lectures shall be at least of 
the Degree of Bachelor of Arts, of honest life and conversationy 
yery well seeing and knowing in these parts of the Mathematics 
above mentioned. 

In each present respective College (excepting always that of 
which the public Professor of the Mathematics is,) and when a new 
public Professor shall be chosen of a College where one of these 
Lectures is, it shall be transferred to that of which the former 
Professor was, the Master and Fellows shall meet together 
within eight days after notice that the settlement for these 
Lectures is made and finished ; and afterwards within the same 
time after notice of the Lecture's place being void either by 
death or otherwise, and every one of the persons there met 
shall have freedom to nominate one of the same College whom 
he in his conscience shall think fit and qualified as abovesaid, 
without favour or affection as he will answer it to God Almighty, 
and not betray the good end and intent of these Lectures. And 
if the persons so nominated shall be above two, then by the 
ballot or otherwise they shall be reduced to two ; and if there 
be not two of the same College fit to be nominated, then any of 
the nominators may name one or more of any other College, 
provided after their election they remove and become of that 
College in which they are to read. 

The persons nominated and agreed on to stand for Readers 
shall, in the presence of two of the Heads of the University, be 
carefully, strictly, and openly examined concerning their skill 
and sufficiency in the science they are to read and explain by 
the public Professor of the Mathematics in the said University. 
And he whom the said Professor shall think and declare from 
his conscience most fit and able to perform the duty of the said 
Lecture effectually shall be the person chosen to read it accord- 
ingly, and enjoy the salary and profits to the same belonging. 
And it shall be required of him at the same time he is appointed 
to read the Lecture, to make a solemn promise as in the presence 
of God, that he will carefully discharge and perform whatever 
is required in the method and orders for settling the said Lecture; 



225 

and this promise shall be made in the presence of the Master 
and Fellows of the College who are to appoint him Reader of 
the said Lecture, whom the public Professor after the examina- 
tion aforesaid shall report most able and fit for it. 

The duty of the said Lecturer shall be to explain and teach 
the said science of Algebra, and shew the use of it in Geometry 
and Arithmetic, and to render the same as clear and intelligible 
to every one of his audience as he can. To which end the said 
Lecture shall be read publicly in the College Hall in the Latin 
tongue during the time of one whole hour, from ten of the clock 
to eleven in the forenoon, and the same day in the afternoon 
shall during the same time from three of the clock be more 
familiarly discoursed of and explained over again and doubts 
concerning any part of it to be resolved in the Lecturer^s own 
chamber, to be open on purpose at that time to all of the same 
College that will come ; and of both these hours of reading and 
explaining over again the said Lectures notice shall be given 
by ringing the College bell. And those Lectures shall be to be 
read in the forenoon and further to be explained in the afternoon 
once a week ; the which weeks and particular days of reading 
shall be those which the Masters and Fellows of each particular 
College shall agree upon and appoint as most convenient, provided 
twelve several Lectures be read in the forenoon and further 
explained in the afternoon as before expressed on so many several 
weeks within the space of one year. 

And for every time the said Lecture shall not be actually 
read in the morning and explained in the afternoon as aforesaid, 
either by the Reader himself, or in case of such Euckness as in 
the judgment of able Physicians doth make him incapable to 
perform it, which is the only excuse that ever shall be allowed, 
and that no longer than one month without substituting one 
other, or by some other able man, to be approved by the public 
Professor, and who shall for every Lecture receive the same 
money that would have been due to the Reader himself, there 
shall be deducted out of his salary each audit day so many pro* 
portionable sums due for each Lecture as 'there were Lectures 
omitted, of which respective omissions notice shall be then given 
by the Master or some of the Fellows of the same College of 
which he is. The which money shall be given to some one or 



226 

more Students of that College according to the discretion of the 
Master especially such as lore these studies. And if five omis- 
sions have been made (except as before) the Reader shall forfeit 
and lose his place. 

The Lecturer or his substitute shall each audit day deliver 
in three (or more if he please) of the six Lectures read the 
foregoing half year, fairly written, to be kept in the College 
Library for the use of all such as may resort thither, or to be 
printed if he consent to it, and till they are so delivered he shall 
not receive that half year's stipend. 

No person chosen to read the said Lecture shall enjoy this 
place longer than ten whole years ; nor shall the public Professor 
of Mathematics ever be one. 

If any Reader shall be found guilty of any heinous crime or 
be of scandalous life, he shall be turned out of his place and 
another chosen in his room, unless there shall appear very great 
and sufficient reason to believe an amendment. 

If any doubt shall hereafter arise concerning the true mean- 
ing of any thing herein expressed, it shall be interpreted by the 
Trustees in that sense that may be the most advantageous for 
the fullest and most effectual promoting the said Lectures. 

Each Lecturer shall receive for his salary yearly twenty 
pounds, but to Emmanuel College Lecturer shall be allowed thirty 
pounds per annum, and to be first erected, to be paid on the 
audit day, according to the limitations above mentioned, out of 
the rents and profits of the Estates I have in my Will for that 
purpose given, and to erect so many as the said Estates will hold 
out to do, none exceeding twenty pounds as aboye, only Emma- 
nuel College, some incident charges hereafter following being 
first deducted. 

There shall be every year two audit days, one within two 
months at the furthest after Lady-Day, and the other within 
the same time after Michaelmas-Day. On which days the Vice- 
chancellor and Heads of the respective Colleges being met 
together shall take an account of the due execution and per- 
formance of the matters and things aforesaid, if they are desired 
to be or hereby are to be Trustees for these Lectures. Likewise 
one of the public Readers by turns shall once in every year, at 
the most seasonable time for travelling, be obliged to take a 



227 

view of all the Estate given for these Lectures, in the company 
of the Bursar, and make a report of the condition all things are 
in to the Trustees, and this under the penalty of losing one 
half year's salary if they refuse it in their turns, unless for very 
good cause to be approved by the Trustees. The Bursars shall 
also succeed one another yearly by turns under the same penalty. 
The said Trustees shall choose and appoint one of the aforesaid 
Headers as Bursar or Bent-gatherer accountable to themselves 
(if the Estate for these uses given be settled and vested in the 
TTniversity,) allowing him out of the said rents five pounds per 
annum, to be paid half yearly when he brings in his accounts on 
the audit day or as they think fit, not exceeding five pounds per 
annum. They shall likewise on each audit day allow and pay 
to the public Professor of the Mathematics ten shillbgs, as a 
present for his care and pains for every person he examined 
the half year aforegoing. They shall also out of the said rents 
on each audit day take for a decent refreshment of a dinner for 
themselves as they shall in discretion think fit, not exceeding 
five pounds. 

And the Yice-Chancellor, just before the payment of the 
Lecturers' salaries, in the presence of the Heads of the Univer- 
sity and the public Professor, shall make a short discourse 
exhorting all then present to discharge their trust and duty with 
care and good conscience. It being hoped these studies of Alge^ 
bra which Peter Ramus long since complained were unhappily 
wanting in our European schools and Universities, now cultivated 
by the excellent wits of the University, will be much for the 
glory of Almighty God and the good of the Nation. Amen. 

An addition which I further add to this my Instrument for the 
Algebra Lectures : 

Since the making of the abovesaid Instrument, on my further 
consideration of the several parts thereof, and on further infor- 
mation and advice, I do order that that part which relates to the 
choice of a Lecturer be altered as foUoweth, viz. 

That in the choice of a Lecturer it shall not be done by all 
the Fellows, but only by the Master, Vice-Master, Senior Dean, 
and Senior Lecturer of each College, and they to nominate two. 



228 

and the two so nominated by a majorltj of them to bo examined 
by the Mathematical Professor^ in presence of two Heads of 
Colleges to be named by the Trustees, and the person whom 
the said Professor shall think and nominate to be most deserving 
to read these Lectures shall have it : and that the Yice-Chan- 
oellor for the time being shall for ever be a Trustee, if my 
Executors shall think it fitting to siettle the said Estates on or in 
the Members of the University. 

And if it shall be thought convenient instead of two audit 
days every year I do order but one ; but this I leave as in- 
different, and desire it may in future time be either one or two, 
as shall be best for the good management of the Estates belong- 
ing or to belong to the said Lectures. 

And as to the travelling Lecturer, I order his charges to be 
paid out of the common stock what shall be thought convenient 
by the Trustees for his and his attendant's charges. 

And if any thing in these Instruments shall hereafter be 
found doubtful or not practicable, I do order my Executors, 
with the advice of those persons they shall think good to consult 
with, to explain what is dubious or alterable, or what is necessary 
further for the good and better establishment of the said Lec- 
tures for ever. And what my executors shall therein do or 
alter I hereby order to be confirmed and to be binding to the 
persons concerned for ever. 

Founded by Dahb Mart Sadlbir, Relict of Dr. William 
Cronne and Daughter of John Lorimer, Esq. 

Mart Sadleir. 



Orders concerning the Algebra Lectures founded by the 

Lady Sadler. 

I. That the government, ordering^ and direction of the said 
Lectures, and the several matters thereto belonging, subject 
nevertheless to the rules and orders herein contained, shall now 
and at all times hereafter be and continue in the yice-Chancellor 
of the sidd University of Cambridge for the time being, and his suc- 
cessors Vice- Chancellors of the said University, and in the present 
Masters or Heads of the several Colleges of the said University 



229 

hereinafter mentioned ; that is to say, the Master of Emmanuel 
College, the Provost of King's College, the Master of St. John's 
College, the Master of Sidney College, the Master of Trinity 
College, the Master of Jesus College, the Master of Pembroke 
Hall, the Master of Queens' College, and the Master of St. 
Peter's College, and in their successors, being Masters or Heads 
of the said several Colleges respectively, and that they shall 
meet for that purpose at such times and places as the Vice- 
chancellor of the said University for the time being, or the said 
Master of Emmanuel College, or any two others of the said Gover- 
nors shall from time to time direct or appoint. 

IL That upon every occasion of meeting due notice of the 
time and place thereof shall be given or left in writing at the 
said several Colleges for the respective Governors or Directors, 
at least by the space of twenty-four hours before every such 
meeting. All matters debated and transacted shall be carried 
and affirmed by the votes of the major part of them then present, 
so as they be not fewer than three, and shall be entered in some 
book or books to be kept for that purpose in Emmanuel College. 
And that in case the said William Rous shall, during his life, 
think fit to be present at any of the said meetings, then he to 
have a like vote and place there as Governor. 

III. That the true end, intent and meaning of these Lec- 
tures is for the full and clear explicating and teaching the 
principles of the Mathematics, and chiefly that part thereof 
called Algebra. And that from and after the 29th day of Sep* 
tember, which will be in the year of our Lord 1710, the siud 
Lectures shall commence and be settled in Emmanuel College 
and Eing^s College in the said University ; and that such person 
or persons being of the said Colleges as the said William Rous 
shall by any writing under his hand appoint shall be the first 
or modern Lecturer or Lecturers or Instructors of the said 
science in the said respective Colleges. And that, as the lives 
shall fall and the estate be increased, the like Lectures shall 
begin and be settled in St. John's College, Sidney College, 
Trinity College, Jesus College, Pembroke Hall, Queens' College, 
and St. Peter's College, one after the other, in order as they 
are herein placed ; the first named to be always preferred in 
course before the subsequent Colleges,, and so remain for ever ; 



230 

subject neyertheless to the rules and directions herein men- 
tioned. 

IV. That if the said lands and premises shall at any time 
hereafter arise to a greater value, by increase of rent or profits 
of the woods or underwoods, than will pay the Lecturers of the 
siud several Colleges before-named their respective yearly sala- 
ries, free of all charges except Parliamentary taxes, (of which 
each of the Lecturers is to bear his proportionable part) that 
then the said Governors and Directors for the time being, at the 
time of such increase, shall and may settle and establish other 
Lectures of the like nature, subject to the rules and orders hereby 
agreed on, in such other Colleges of the said University as they 
shall judge most proper. 

y. That the persons to be chosen Lecturers or Instructors 
shall be at least of the Degree of Bachelors of Arts, of honest 
life and conversation, and skilful in the several parts of the 
Mathematics, to continue from their election for the space of 
ten years, or till their death, resignation, or removal from their 
respective College or Colleges, or other discharges as are here- 
after mentioned, if the same shall sooner happen. 

YL That from time to time as the said Lectures shall begin, 
and be settled in any of the other Colleges before-named, and 
not at present provided for, then such person and persons being 
of the said College and Colleges as the said WiUiam Rous shall 
at any time during his life by any writing under his hand 
nominate and appoint for that purpose, shall be the first Lecturer 
and Lecturers in every such College or Colleges, to continue as 
aforesaid ; and in default of such nomination and appointment^ 
then the said Governors for the time being, or the major part 
of them, shall and may at a meeting to be had for that purpose, 
nominate such first Lecturer and Lecturers, to continue as afore- 
said, each College to be taken in course in the order before set 
do?m, and not otherwise. 

YII. That at all times, on the expiration of the siud term of 
ten years, or notice of the death, resignation, removal, or dis- 
charge of any such Lecturer or Lecturers, now, or at any time 
coming, to be chosen, elected, or named for the purposes afore* 
said, the said William Rous, during his life, and after his 
decease, the Provost, Master, or Head of such College and 



231 

Colleges wherein such vacancies shall be, or in his absence, his 
Deputy, shall always, within fourteen days then next and im- 
mediately following, elect and choose one or more person or 
persons of the said College the best qualified for the said 
Lecture ; or if there be none of the said College fit to be nomi- 
nated, then one or more of any other College, provided that, 
in case of election, the person so chosen remove and become of 
that College wherein the said Lecture is to be read; which 
person and persons so named shall, within twenty-one days after 
the said nomination, be carefully, strictly and openly examined 
touching his and their skill and sufficiency in the said science 
by the Public Professors of the Mathematics or Astronomy of 
the said University, or one of them, or by such other person or 
persons qualified in the said science, as the Governors and Direc- 
tors for the time being, or any three of them, shall call to their 
assistance, in the presence of three or more of the said Governors; 
and such of them as shall, upon such Examination, appear to the 
said Governors for the time being then present, or the major 
part of them, to be most fit and able, shall be declared Lecturer, 
and enjoy the salary and profits thereto belonging. 

VIII. That such Professors, or other person or persons so 
to be chosen to examine, as aforesaid, for every Examination 
shall have and receive of the person so chosen the sum of ten 
shillings for his trouble and attendance therein. 

IX. That such person so chosen shall before any Lecture 
read, in the presence of the s£ud Governors for the time being 
(or any three of them) make and subscribe a solemn promise, in 
writing, to be prepared for that purpose, that he will diligently 
and carefully perform his duty in the said Lecture, and observe 
the several orders and directions in these presents established for 
that purpose. 

X. That the duty of the said Lecturer shall be to explain 
and teach the principles of the Mathematics^ and chiefly that 
part thereof called Algebra^ in as clear and intelligible a method 
as possible ; and to that end every such Lecturer shall, at least 
once in each of the three Terms commonly holden in the said 
University, on such days as shall be appointed to him, hold a 
Public Eeading in the hall of his respective College, in the Latin 
tongue (or otherwise as the said Governors, or any three of them 



232 

shall direct), by the space of one ^hole hour, from nine to ten 
of the clock in the forenoon, and also the same day in the after- 
noon in his own chamber, to be open for that purpose during the 
space of one hour, from one to two of the clock, more familiarly 
discourse of and explain the same again to all of the said College 
who shall then attend there, and resolve the doubts arising, or 
which shall then be proposed to him in relation thereto ; of both 
which hours notice shall be given by ringing of the College bell, 

XL That the Provost, Master, or Head of each College, or 
his Deputy in his absence, shall the first day in every Term fix 
and appoint the several days as well for holding the said Lecture 
as teaching the said science for that Term ; which appointment 
shall be put into writing, and one fair copy thereof set up in the 
public hall of each College, and one other copy delivered to the 
yice-Chancellor of the said University for the time being ; and 
the Lecturers for the respective Colleges are to take notice of 
the day so appcHnted, and to perform their duties thereon, on 
the penalties hereinafter mentioned. 

XII. That every Lecturer shall twice in each week, on the 
days appointed to him for that purpose, during the whole con- 
tinuance of each of the said three University Terms, according 
to the computation therein used, (save such week wherein the 
said Lecture shall be read as aforesaid), by the space of one 
hour or more, from nine to ten of the clock, at his chambers, 
teach and instruct in the said science all such Students of the 
same College as shall repair to him for that purpose, and therein 
shall behave himself affably and courteously, and not deter or 
discourage any from coming to him on any account or pretence 
whatsoever. 

XIIL That, upon failure of reading the said Lectures or of 
attending the teaching and instructing the said Students as afore- 
said, by the space of two whole Terms, in any of the Colleges 
wherein the said Lectures are or shall be erected or settled, 
such College or Colleges permitting, suffering, or conniving at 
such failure, without discharging such Lecturer offending therein, 
and electing a new one in manner aforesaid, shall from thence- 
forth and immediately forfeit and lose the benefit, privilege, and 
advantage of the said Lecture, and of the continuance thereof 
any longer in such College or Colleges, and the allowance^ salary, 



233 

and profit belonging thereto shall from thenceforth utterly cease 
and determine; and in such case the said Governors for the 
time being shall and may, within one month next ensuing the 
end of the said two Terms (at a meeting to be had for that pur- 
pose), settle the said Lecture in some other College of the said 
University, as they shall think fit, subject to the rules, orders, 
and direction herein ; and if all the Colleges before-named shall 
not be provided for, then the first of such Colleges, in the 
order aforesaid, shall have the said Lecture so ceased and de- 
termined. 

XIY. That for every time the said Lecture shall not be 
actually read in the morning, and explained in the afternoon, or 
that due attendance shall not be given for teaching the said 
science as aforesaid, except in case of real sickness and disability, 
certified under the hand of some practising Doctor in Physic, or 
of some extraordinary occasion, to be allowed of by the Master, 
Provost, or Head of each respective College under his hand, 
(which are the only excuses that shall be ever allowed), there 
shall be deducted out of the salary of each Lecturer offending 
therein on every audit day for each Lecture omitted the sum of 
forty shillings, and for every day wherein he shall not give due 
attendance for instructing the said Students the sum of ten shil- 
lings, the said sums so forfeited to go and be disposed of to one 
or more of the poor Scholars loving the said study, at the dis- 
cretion of the said Governors then present (or the major part of 
them) ; and if omission shall have been made herein by the space 
of one whole Term, (except in case of sickness or extraordinary 
occasion allowed of as aforesaid), each Lecturer so offending shall 
from thenceforth immediately forfeit and lose his place, and be 
for ever incapable to be named or chosen again to the same Lec- 
ture, either in that or any other College in the said University 
on any account or pretence whatsoever. 

XY. That in case of real sickness or extraordinary occasion 
testified as aforesaid (and not otherwise) every such Lecturer 
may substitute in his place some other able person, to be approved 
by the public Professors of the Mathematics or Astronomy of 
the said University, or one of them, or in default of them by 
any other person or persons skilful in the Mathematics, to be 
testified under his or their hand or hands to the Provost, Master, 

VOL. III. 5 



234 

or Head of such respective College or Colleges, or his Deputy ; 
^hich person shall receiye for eyery Lecture and teaching the 
same money as would have been due to the Lecturer himself ; 
and in default of such substitution, in case the said sickness or 
disability shall continue, so as that the Lecture and times of 
teaching shall be omitted by the space of one month, then such 
Lecturer shall from thenceforth lose bis place and all the benefit 
thereof or thereby. 

XYI. That by and out of the said Estate and the profits 
thereof there shall be paid and allowed to the said Lecturer in 
Emmanuel College thirty pounds per annum, and to the several 
Lecturers in the said other Colleges wherein the same is or shall 
be settled twenty pounds per annum a-piece, to be paid on the 
audit-day in each year, subject nevertheless to their respective 
proportions of the Parliamentary taxes and other necessary 
charges to which the Estate is or may be liable, and other limita- 
tions as aforesaid. And so as every such Lecturer shall, be- 
fore the audit-day, deliver and give in two copies fairly written 
of two such Lectures as aforementioned, read by him in the 
foregoing year, to the Vice-Chancellor for the time being, or to 
the Master of Emmanuel College, to be shewn to the Governors 
present at such Audit ; one of which copies shall be deposited 
by the Vice-Chancellor in the University Library, and the other 
in the Library of the respective College wherein he shall be 
Lecturer, and do then also produce a certificate under the hand 
of the Master or his Deputy, signifying the number of the said 
Lectures by him read, and of the attendance by him given for 
teaching the said science in the foregoing year, to the end it 
may be known what omissions have been made therein or other- 
wise ; and in default of either of the matters aforesaid the said 
year's salary to be forfeited, and to go and be paid to and 
amongst the other Lecturers not offending therein, share and 
share alike. 

XYIL That in case any of the said Lecturers during the 
time of their continuance in the said place shall happen to be 
chosen one of the public Professors of the Mathematics or 
Astronomy for the said University, and shall accept thereof, 
then the place of such Lecturer, from and immediately after such 
acceptance, shall be, and is hereby declared to be void, and 



235 

another Lecturer shall be ohosen thereto in the manner here«^ 
inbefore appointed, 

XVIII. That if any of the said Lecturers shall prove of 
iU life and conversation, or guilty of any notorious crime, im- 
morality, or of maintaining or defending any doctrines or opinions 
contrary to the religion of the Church of England as by ]aw 
established, then in any of the said cases, the Master or Head of 
such College in which he shall be Lecturer as aforesaid, or his 
Deputy, or in their default the said Governors, or any three 
of them, to be assembled for that purpose, shall and may dis- 
charge such person of and from his place and office of Lec- 
turer, and another shall be chosen in his room in the manner 
aforesaid. 

XIX. That for the better management of the manor, lands, 
and premises devised as aforesaid, the said Governors and their 
successors shall and may from time to time appoint such person 
and persons as they, or the major part of them, shall think pro- 
per to be receiver of the rents, issues, and profits of the said 
premises, and to take care of the said woods, and to transact 
their affairs in the said County of Southampton, or elsewhere, 
and also one of the said Governors or Lecturers or other fit 
person to be Treasurer or Bursar of the said profits. But so 
as such TreoMirer or Bursar and Beceiver respectively do and 
shall give good security unto the said Governors or any three of 
them, by bond or otherwise, in penalty of two hundred pounds 
at the least, for his duly accounting for and paying from time to 
time the said rents, issues, and profits to the Governors herein 
mentioned for the uses and purposes hereby directed, and no. 
other. 

XX. That the said Governors shall yearly, within the space 
of two months next after the 29th of September in each year, 
or at such other time or times in the year as any three of them 
shall agree on and appoint and thereof give notice to the par- 
ties concerned, meet together at Emmanud College on a day to 
be appointed by the yice-Chancellor of the said University or 
the Master of Emmanuel College for the time being, to take the 
account and audit of the said Beceiver and Trea^surer, and to 
pay the said Lecturers their respective salaries and allowance, 
and all other charges hereby directed to be paid, and to hear 

6 — 2 



236 

and determine all matters relating to the said Lectures and 
Estate, according to the rules and directions hereby given, and 
to see the same effectually paid and performed according to the 
true intent hereof. 

XXL That at every audit these rules, orders, and directions 
shall be distinctly read in presence of the said Governors, and 
that there shall be allowed out of the said Estate a sum not 
exceeding four pounds for a dinner and all other charges of 
the said day. 

XXII. That the deeds, evidences, and writings relating to 
the said Estate shall from time to time be kept and deposited in 
the library of Emmani^l College in an iron chest with three 
locks thereto, the keys whereof shall be and remain one of them 
in the hands of the Yice-Chancellor of the said University for 
the time being, one other in the hands of the Master of Em-, 
manuel College, and the third in the hands of the Provost of 
King's College, and their Successors. 

XXIIL That the several Governors to whom the said Estate 
shall be conveyed for the uses aforesaid be the present Master 
or Head of Emmanuel College, the Provost of King's College, 
the Master of St. John's College, the Master of Sidney College, 
the Master of Trinity College, the Master of Jesus College, the 
Master of Pembroke Hall, the Master of Queens' College, and 
the Master of St. Peter's College ; and that when and so often 
as they shall be reduced by death to Jive or three, that then the 
survivors shall convey the same to the succeeding Heads of the 
said several Colleges, so that the said number of Tntstees may 
always be kept of the number of nine at the least. 

XXiy. That in case any of the family, kindred, or relations 
of the said Dr. William Croon^ shall happen to be of any of 
the siud Colleges afore-named, or of any College in the said 
University wherein any of the said Lectures before-mentioned 
shall then be erected or settled in pursuance of these presents, 
and shall upon examination be found fitly qualified for the read^ 
ing and performing the said Lecture, then such person or persons 
to be preferred before any other to such vacant Lecture, and 
shall be elected and chosen thereto by the said Truatees^ and 

* First husband of the Lady Sadler, by whose advice she founded 
these Lectures. (On a label pasted in the margin.) 



237 

shall hold and enjoy the same and all the profits, benefits, and 
advantages thereto belonging, subject to the orders, rules, and 
directions hereinbefore contained, as the other Lecturers are to 
do by virtue hereof. 

That these several Orders be fairly written or printed, and 
being put into a frame be hung up in the several libraries of the 
respective Colleges wherein the said Lectures are to be read. 



238 



X. Mr. Worts' Endowments. 

Copy of the last Will of William Worts, Esq. 

In the Name of God, Amen. I William Worts, of Cambridge, 
in the County of Cambridge, Esqr., being of a perfect, sound, 
and disposing Mind and Memory, do make this my last WiU and 
Testament in manner and form following: 

In the first place I commit my Soul to Almighty God, humbly 
hoping for Salvation through the infinite Mercy of God, and 
Merits and Mediation of Jesus Christ my Redeemer; and my. 
Body to be decently buried by my Executrix hereafter named. 
r give and bequeath to Carolina Banson, the Wife of John 
Banson of Meesden in the county of Hartford, an annuity of £30 
a-year during her life, in case she survives her said husband, and 
not otherwise, to be paid her by my Executrix, by the propor- 
tion of £7. 10^. every Quarter-day following, viz. on the Feast 
of the Annunciation of the Blessed Virgin Mary, the Feast of 
St. John the Baptist, St. Michael the Archangel, and St. Thomas 
the Apostle; the first payment thereof to commence on such of 
the said Quarter-days next succeeding the death of her said 
Husband: and all the said Payments to be made constantly at 
the place and the residence of the said Carolina Banson: and I 
charge all my Arable Lands, late in the tenure or occupation of 
the Widow Chapman of Landbeche in the said County of Cam- 
bridge with the said Annuity, that in case of failure in the 
payment thereof it shall and may be lawful for the said Carolina 
Banson to enter upon, possess and enjoy the said lands as if 
originally devised to her for her life. Item, I give and bequeath 
to Elizabeth Saville, the Wife of Saville of Langley in the 
County of Essex, an Annuity of £20 a-year during her life, in 
case she survives her said Husband, to be paid by my Executrix, 
at the usual place of her abode, by £5 on each of the Quarter- 
days before mentioned^ the first payment thereof to be on such 



239 

of the said Qaarter-days as shall next succeed the death of her 
said Husband: and I charge with the said Annuity all those my 
Pasture Grounds, with the Messuage, Tenement and Sheep- Walk, 
with the Appurtenances, late in the tenure or occupation of the 
said Widow Chapman, and that it may and shall be lawful 
for the said Elizabeth Saville, in case of failure in the pay* 
ment of the said Annuity, to enter upon, possess and enjoy the 
said Messuage, Pasture, Tenement, and Sheep- Walk with their 
Appurtenances during her life, as if they were so originally 
devised to her. Item, I give and bequeath to my Cousin Smith, 
the wife of John Smith of Wivelingham in the County of Cam^ 
bridge, the like Annuity of £20 a-year during her Ufe, to be 
paid her by my Executrix, in such manner and form as the 
aforesaid Annuity to Elizabeth Saville; and I charge with the 
said Annuity to my said Cousin Smith all those my Arable 
Lands now in the tenure or occupation of John Penny of Land- 
beche aforesaid, so that in case of failure in the payment of the said 
Annuity it shall and may be lawful for my said Cousin Smith 
to enter upon, possess, and enjoy the said Lands during her hfe, 
as if originally so devised to her^ Item, I give and bequeath to 
my old maid, Margaret Brett, £20, to be paid six months after 
my death. Item, I give and bequeath to Anne Garrett, Bedmaker 
of Eing^s College in Cambridge, an Annuity of £5 a-year dur- 
ing her life, to be paid Quarterly by my Executrix, by equal 
portions on the 4 Quarter-days herein before mentioned, the first 
payment thereof to become due and payable on such of the said 
days as shall next happen after the said Anne Garrett shall be of 
the age of threescore years; and I will and appoint that my 
Executrix give her a Bond of £200 within a month after my 
decease for the security of the payment of the said Annuity. 
Item, I give and bequeath unto the said Margaret Brett, over 
and above the £20 already given her, an Annuity of £20 for 
her life, in case she survives her Husband Henry Brett, of 
Cambridge aforesaid. Barber, to be paid by niy Executrix in 
manner and form like that bequeathed to Elizabeth Saville; and I 
charge with the said Annuity my Messuage, Pasture Ground and 
Sheep- Walk, with the Appurtenances, now in the occupation of 
John Penny aforesaid of Landbeche, so that in case of failure of 
the payment thereof, it shall and may be lawful for the said 



240 

Margaret Brett to enter upon and enjoy the Premises hereby 
charged with the payment thereof, as if they had been originally 
devised to her for her life. Item, I give and bequeath all those 
my Messuages, Lands, Tenements, and Hereditaments, with their 
Appurtenances, now in the tenure or occupation of Michael 
Walker of Landbeche aforesaid, both Freehold and Copyhold, to 
my Aunt Daye, for and during the term of her natural life, 
chargeable nevertheless with the payment of £30 a-year to my 
Aunt Elizabeth Beeves, to be paid her by my Aunt Daye, 
during the life of the said Anne Daye, the first payment thereof 
to be made on Michaelmas-day after my Decease; and in case of 
failure of payment of the said £30 a-year in manner aforesaid, 
it shall and may be lawful for the said Elizabeth Reeves to enter 
into the said Messuage, Lands, and Premises, now in the tenure 
or occupation of the said Michael Walker, and them to hold, to 
take, and enjoy the Profits thereof to her own use, as if they had 
been originally devised to her for her life; and in case the said 
Elizabeth Keeves shall survive the said Anne Daye, then I give and 
bequeath the said Messuage, Lands, and Premises, now in the 
tenure or occupation of the said Michael Walker, to the said Eliza- 
beth Reeves, for and during the term of her natural life. Item, I 
give and bequeath to my Uncle, Mr, Robert Daye, of Thurlow 
in the County of Suffolk, Apothecary, an Annuity of £20 a-year 
during his life, to be paid by my Executrix quarterly, by equal 
portions, in such manner and form as the Annuity hereinbefore 
bequeathed to Elizabeth Saville is appointed to be paid, except 
that the first payment hereof is to commence on such of the said 
Quarter-days as shall first happen after my death : and I do also 
appoint my Executrix within three months after my death to 
give the said Robert Daye a Bond in the penal sum of £400 for 
the due payment of the said Annuity to him bequeathed. Item, 
I give and bequeath to the two youngest sons of my Uncle, 
Robert Daye aforesaid, the sum of £50 a-piece, to bind them 
out Apprentices: and I will and appoint and give £100 a-piece 
afterwards to set them up withal, if they behave themselves as 
well as they ought to do in their Apprenticeships; and I will and 
appoint that my Executrix have the sole disposal of them therein. 
Item, I give and bequeath to my said Aunt Reeves, over and 
above what is herein already given to her, the sum of £20 to 



241 

hnj her mourning, and to be paid her within a month after my 
decease: and she shall have the choice of any Piece of my Plate, 
or any of my Rings, to keep in remembrance of me. Item, 
I give to my Cousin Christian Hutton the sum of £20. Item, I 
give to my Godson, Wm. Sanson of Langley, £10. Item, I 
give to Dr. Penrice of Trinity Hall in Cambridge the sum of 
£100 for his great civility to me, and care in my affairs. Item, 
I give unto my servant Mary Foreham the sum of £20. Item, to 
Jane Smee, and Richard Challis, my other two servants, the sum 
of £5 a-piece. Item, I will and appoint that my Executrix 
prove this my last Will and Testament in the Yice-Chancellor^s 
Court of the University of Cambridge within a month after my 
decease, and that she there and then deliver in upon oath a true 
and perfect particular and valuation of all the Lands, Moneys, 
Bonds, Mortgages, and Debts owing to me from private persons, 
and from the Exchequer. And as for my real Estate in Land- 
beche herein before not disposed of, with my two houses in Eing^s 
College Lane, I also give and devise the same to my said Aunt 
Daye, for and during the term of her natural life, subject never- 
theless to, and charged with the Annuities or Rent-charges 
hereinbefore devised. And I also will and appoint that my said 
Aunt Anne Daye shall every year, during her life, by equal 
quarterly payments, pay the sum of £30, without any deduction 
of Taxes by Parliament or otherwise, to the use of the poor 
children, which now are or shall hereafter be taught in the several 
schools in Cambridge aforesaid, commonly called The Charity 
Schools, lately set up chiefly by the care of the pious and 
learned Mr. Whiston, the first payment to be made on such of 
the Quarter-days abovementioned, as shall next happen after my 
death: the said payment, and all the subsequent payments to be 
made to the person, who, for the time being, collects the sub- 
scriptions to the said Schools, and the said £30 a-year to be 
applied in the same manner as the money collected from the said 
subscriptions is and shall be applied. And from and after the 
decease of the said Anne Daye, and as to what is before given to 
my Aunt Reeves, in case she survives my said Aunt Daye, in 
such case as to that aft;er the decease also of my said Aunt 
Reeves, then I give, devise, and bequeath all my Manors, Mes- 
suages, Lands, Tenements, and Hereditaments in Landbeche 



342 

aforegidd, and aldo my two houses in Ring's College Lane, to Dr. 
Roderick, ProTost of King's College; Dr. Bentley, Master of 
Trinity College; Dr. James, Master of Queens' College; Dr* 
Covell, Master of Christ's College; and Sir John Ellis, Master 
of Gonville and Caius College in Cambridge; and their Heirs 
and Assigns for erer; netertheless upon such spedal trust and 
confidence in them reposed, as shall be hereinafter declared con- 
cerning the same. Item, I giro and bequeath unto the said four 
Doctors and Sir John Ellis the sum of £3,000, to be paid them 
by my Executrix, within six months after my death, in ready- 
money, or by assignment to them of any of my Mortgages, Tallies, 
or Orders or in any other manner as to them shall Seem good and 
effectual payment ; upon such special trust and confidence never- 
theless reposed in them as shall be hereinafter declared concern* 
ing the same: That is to say, as for and concerning the said 
^3,000, upon this special trust and confidence. That the said 
four Doctors and Sir John Ellis, or the survivors of them, or the 
Executors or Administrators of the survivor of them, out of the 
Interest Money and Improvement made thereof, shall, in the 
first place, pay or cause to be paid unto my said Aunt Anne 
Daye every year during her natural life the sum of ^^160 at 
two payments in the year, that is to say, on the Feast of the 
Annunciation of the Blessed Virgin Mary, and on the Feast of 
St. Michael the Archangel, by equal portions, the first payment 
thereof to be made on such of the said Feasts as shall next 
happen after I have been dead a full year: and from and after 
the decease of my said Aunt Daye, then, as well concerning my 
real Estate in Landbeche and King's College Lane, and also my 
personal Estate, which t have devised to the four Doctors and 
Sir John Ellis, and the Trusts thereof, I do hereby declare and 
appoint, That they, or the survivors of them, or the Executors or 
Administrators of the survivor of them, so long as the said 
Charity Schools shall endure and be kept up in any reputation, 
shall, in the first place, constantly pay the said sum of ii^30 
a-year to their use, in such manner as my said Aunt Anne Daye 
k herein before appointed to pay the same; and also all the 
Annuities herein before by me given that shall remain due and 
payable after the death of my said Aunt Anne Daye, except 
those that I have obliged my said Aunt to give bond for* In 



243 

the next place I appoint and desire that the annual indome both 
of my gaid Lands and Money and the Improrement thereof be 
managed to the best advantage till the sam of £1,500 be raased 
therefrom, with whioh I desire that with all conrenient speed 
after the same is so raised Galleries be built in Great St. Mary's 
Church in Cambridge, for the use of the Bachelors of Arts and 
Under'graduates in the University, that they may the more 
decently and conveniently hear the Sermon. And when these 
Galleries are finished, I appoint and desire, as soon as another 
^1,500 can be raised out of the annual income of my said Lands 
and Money and the Improvements thereof, that it may be 
applied to the making a Calcey or Causeway from Emmanuel 
College to Hogmagog, alias Gogmagog Hills; and I de&ire, if 
there be occasion, that an Act of Parliament may be procured 
for the making and securing that Road; and when it is 
finished, I desire that £4tO a-year be laid aside for the main- 
tenance and repairs of that and the said Galleries in St Mary'isl 
Church, and expended from time to time as there shall be 
occasion, in such proportions to each as the Trustees or major 
part of them shall think fit; and as soon as the said Galleries are 
finished, I further appoint and desire that there be allowed 
annual Pensions of ^^100 a-year each to two young Bachelors of 
Arts, who shall be sent into foreign countries soon after they have 
taken that Degree, and shall continue there for the space of 
three years, but be obliged to take different roads, as they shall 
be appointed by the said Trustees, or the major part of them. 
They shall each of them likewise be obliged to write once in a 
month a letter in Latin to the Yice-Chancellor of the said 
University, who shall communicate them to the Regent-House, 
and leave them fairly written to be lodged in the Public Library 
among the MSS. there. In thoce letters they shall give an 
account to the University of the religion, learning, laws, politics, 
customs, manners, and rarities, natural and artificial, which they 
shall find worth observing in the countries through which they 
pass. They shall be chosen out of two different Colleges: they 
sball begin with King's and Trinity, each of which shall present 
two young Gentlemen to the Congregation, which shall choose 
one out of each of the two Colleges. The rest of the Colleges 
shall take it by turns to present in the same manner in the order 



244 

lUt they do for the choice of Proctors^ as often as there shall be 
occasion to supply the place of them, or either of them, by reason 
of death or return into their own country : And my Will is, that 
these Pensions shall be continued but for the space of three years. 
The Master in every College shall present, and at the presenta- 
tion of them shall be obliged to take the following Oath, which 
shall be read to him by the Senior Proctor in the Begent-House, 
before the University , at a Congregation: — 

Dahis jfidem Almae Matri Acculemiae, quod tu probe noveris 
religionem, mores, et doctrinam juvenum, quos modo prde- 
sentcisti, et eos sane dignos existimasj quos foras emittcU 
Alma Mater; Sic te Deus adfuvet. 

The residue and overplus of what I have given to the said 
four Doctors and Sir John Ellis, after these things are performed 
and all reasonable expenses have been allowed for the manage- 
ment of all matters relating to thief my Will, I desire may be 
applied to the use of the University Library. And my further 
Will and desire is, that when any two or more of the Trustees 
shall be dead, then the surviving lYustees shall assign and convey 
all the said Lands and Moneys remaining in them by virtue of 
this my Will to some person or persons, and their heirs, to the 
use of them the surviving Trustees and of some other fit persons 
such as they shall choose or name to be Trustees with them to 
make up the number of five, and of their heirs for ever, upon 
trust for the further performance of this my last Will and Testa- 
ment. And then my Will is, that the old and new Trustees, and 
the survivors of them, shall to all intents and purposes have the 
same power and authority and be in the place of my said Trustees^ 
Dr. Roderick, Dr. Bentley, Di% James, Dr. Covell, and Sir John 
Ellis, as if they were all livmg: and that from time to time, as 
often as there shall be occasion, the surviving Trustees, two or 
more of their number being dead, shall take the like course as 
aforesaid to make up the said number with other fit persons, 
who shall successively for ever have the same power and autho- 
rity to perform this my Will. Lastly, I give all the Money in 
the purses for the poor to make up what is lost from St. Mary'a 
Parish in my Grandfather Daye's gift. All the rest and residue 



245 

of my Goods, Chattels, and personal Estate whatsoever herein 
before not disposed of, my debts, legacies, and funeral charges 
being first paid, I give and bequeath to my said Aunt Anne Daye, 
to her own proper use; and I make her the full and sole 
Executrix of this my last Will and Testament; hereby revoking 
all former Wills and Testaments by me at any time heretofore 
made, publishing and declaring this to be my last Will and 
Testament. In witness whereof, I have to this my Will, con- 
sisting of five sheets of paper, set my hand to every sheet, and 
my hand and seal to the last sheet thereof, the one and twentieth 
day of June, in the eighth year of the reign of our Sovereign 
Lady Anne, by the Grace of God of Great Britain, France, and 
Ireland Queen, Defender of the Faith, &c., and in the year of 
our Lord God 1709. 

WILLIAM WORTS. 

Signed, sealed, published, and declared by the within-named 
William Worts to be his last Will and Testament in the pre- 
sence of us who all subscribed our names as Witnesses thereto in 
his presence. 

EDMOND MILLER. 

JOHN HAMPSOJSr, Senr. 

RIC. SAVAGE, Servant to Mr. Miller. 



i' 
1 



246 



XI, Thb Botanic Garden. 



1. Dr. Walker* 8 Foundation. 



By Indentures of lease and of re-lease and assignment, dated re- 
spectively August 24 aud August 25, 1762, the Rev. Richard 
Walker, D.D., Vice-Master of Trinity College, conveyed certain 
Freehold Messuages, Garden-grounds and hereditaments in the 
parish of St Edward to the Chancellor, Masters and Scholars of 
the University in trust that they should employ and make use 
of, or permit to be employed and made use of, such parts of the 
said premises, as should be thought necessary, as a house for 
the purpose thereinafter-mentioned, and as a public Botanic 
Garden for the use and benefit of the said University, under the 
direction and government of such persons, and subject to such 
statutes, orders and regulations as thereinafter^mentioned and 
referred to ; and as to the residue of the said messuages or tene* 
ments, hereditaments and premises thereby granted and released, 
in trust that the said Chancellor, Masters and Scholars should 
let or sell the same, or any parts or part thereof, for the best 
rent or price that could be procured, and apply the money to 
arise therefrom for the uses of the said Garden, and particularly 
for obtaining from the Corporation of Cambridge the Uke grant 
of about an acre of ground, which lay within the said intended 
Garden (which was then held by lease from the said Corporation 
and thereinafter assigned to the said Chancellor, Masters and 
Scholars, upon the like trusts and for the like purposes as therein- 
before are mentioned), as the said Corporation had then lately 
granted of the Shire-house in the Market-place of the town of 
Cambridge. 

For the better conducting the said public Botanic Garden, 
Dr. Walker appoints and constitutes the Chancellor, or, in his 
absence, the Vice- Chancellor of the said University, the Master 
of Trinity College, the Provost of King's College, the Master of 
St John's College, and the Professor of Physic in the said 
University, for the time being, perpetual Governors and Visitors 



247 

of the public Botanic Garden to regulate, conduct and govern 
the same: and after reciting that the design of the said Garden 
would necessarilj require two officers to be appointed, yiz, a 
Header on Botany and a Curator or Superintendent of the 
Garden, and the Reader must be such proficient in Botany and 
so qualified as to be capable to read Lectures on the same in 
Latin or English, he constitutes and appoints Thomas Martin the 
first Reader to the said public Botanic Garden; and stating that 
the Curator must be a person well skilled in the systems of 
Botany and one fit to be entrusted with the management of the 
said Garden, he also constitutes and appoints Charles Miller the 
first Curator of the said Garden, the said officers to continue in 
the aboYO-mentioned offices during the pleasure of him the said 
Richard Walker and the said Goyernors and Visitors or the 
major part of them; and in case of a Ta^ncy in either of the 
said offices by death or otherwise, he reserves the power of ap- 
pointing such new qualified officer or officers in his or their stead 
to himsielf, with the approbation of the said Governors and 
Visitors or the major part of them ; and he grants, constitutes 
and ordains, that the said Governors and Visitors thereby before 
appointed, o{ the major part of them, for the time being, should 
have full power and authority^ from time to time, after his 
decease, to elect and nominate such Reader on Botany and such 
Curator or Superintendent of the said Botanic Garden, and to 
appoint the persons so respectively elected to such offices by 
instrument or instruments under their hands and seals, or the 
hands and seals of the major part of them. Dr. Walker further 
reserves to himself, together with the approbation of the Go- 
vernors and Visitors, or the major part of them, full power and 
authority during his lifetime, by any instrument or instruments 
in writing under hjis and their hands and seals, from time to time, 
to make such statutes, rules and orders for the better regulating, 
ordering and governing of the said Botanic Garden and the 
officers and servants employed or to be employed therein, and 
the houses and buildings thereunto belonging, and also for carry- 
ing on and performing the Lectures on Botany therein before 
appointed, and for conducting and managing all other matters 
and things relating to the premises, or any of them, as to him 
with such said approbation should seem meet, and in like 



248 

manner to repeal, alter or change the same, or any part th^eof, 
during his life : And he farther grants and ordains, that after 
his decease it should be lawful to and for the said Oovernors 
and Visitors, or the major part of them, and they, or the major 
part of them, should have full power and authority, by any 
instrument or instruments in writing, under their hands and 
seals, from time to time, to amend, alter or repeal any of the 
statutes, rules and orders which should have been made by him 
in his lifetime, or any part thereof, and from time to time in like 
manner to make such new statutes, rules and orders for any of 
the purposes aforesaid as to them should seem meet, and to 
repeal, alter and change the same from time to time as the said 
Governors and Visitors, or the major part of them, should judge 
most expedient. 



Proposed Statutes and Regulations /or the Botanic Garden as 
corrected by Lord Hardwick, in his own handwriting. 

Whbrbas I Richard Walker, Doctor in Divinity and Vice* 
Master of Trinity College in the University of Cambridge, by 
Indentures of lease and release bearing date respectively the 
24th and 25th days of August in the year of our Lord 1762, 
have granted and conveyed to the Chancellor, Masters and 
Scholars of the said University and their successors, certain 
Messuages and several acres of Ground in the Parish of Saint 
Edward in Cambridge for a Public Botanic Garden in the 
said University, and have by the said Indenture of release 
appointed the Rev^ M'. Thomas Martin to be the first Reader to 
the said Public Botanic Garden, and Mr. Charles Miller to be 
the first Curator thereof, both whom I know to be well qualified 
for the said offices; and have constituted and appointed the 
Chancellor of the said University, or in his absence the Vice- 
Chancellor of the said University, the Master of Trinity College, 
the Provost of King's College, the Master of Saint John's College 
and the Professor of Physic in the said University for the time 
being, perpetual Governors and Visitors of thQ said Public 
Botanic Garden, merely reserving to myself during my life the 
power of making Statutes, Rules and Orders under my hand and 



249 

seal, with the approbation of the said Governors and Visitors or 
the major part of them testified by their signing and dealing the 
same, for the better regulating, ordering and governing of the 
said Botanic Garden, and of the officers and servants employed 
or to be employed therein, and the Houses and Buildings there- 
unto belonging, and also for carrying on and performing the 
Lectures on Botany thereby appointed, and for conducting and 
managing all other matters and things relating to the premises 
or any of them, and in Uke manner from time to time to repeal, 
alter or change the same or any part thereof, as by the said 
Indenture of release may more fully appear: Now in pursuance of 
the said power to me reserved as aforesaid and of all other 
powers in me reposed, I the said Richard Walker have thought 
proper, with the approbation of the said Governors and Visitors 
testified as aforesaid to establish the following Statutes, Rules and 
Orders for the purposes above mentioned, and do by these pre- 
sents under my hand and seal, make, ordain and establish the 
same accordingly^ viz. 1st, That a room be fitted up in the said 
capital Messuage for the Governors and Visitors to meet in from 
time to time to view and examine the several works that shall 
be going on, and to direct and manage the same in order to have 
as complete a Collection of Plants as may be, and to have proper 
reception for them as they come in, and to examine from time to 
time, and to adjust the Accounts of the expences of the said 
Garden, and to do all such other acts and make such orders as 
shall from time to time be necessary towards the regulation and 
good government of the said Garden, and of the Officers and 
Servants who are to superintend the same, and that a true abstract 
of my Donation of the said Botanic Garden be fairly transcribed 
on Parchment and put into a frame and hung up in the said 
room, and also one other with the names of the several Bene- 
factors thereto, with the sums by them respectively given, be 
fairly transcribed and hung up in the said room, and a Copy of 
the Statutes, Rules and Orders; and that a proper box be provided 
and kept locked in the said room for the original Deeds of Dona- 
tion, the Statutes, Rules and Orders, and all other writings 
relating to the said Botanic Garden to be kept in, and that 

there be keys thereof, one of such keys to be kept by 

, another by &c. 

VOL. III. 6 



i 

f 



260 

2d, That as soon as the Green-house shall be finished, and a 
stove or stoves erected for tender Plants, and the Garden finished 
for the reception of the more hardy sorts, trials and experiments 
shall be regularly made and repeated of the virtues of Plants in 
order to discover their salutary properties and uses for the 
benefit of mankind, and particularly upon those Plants which 
are reputed poisonous, since all these have great powers of 
altering animal bodies ; and if experience had fully taught us the 
manner of using them and the quantities proper to be used and 
all the necessary cautions to be observed, it is highly probable 
that they might be turned into the most active and valuable 
medicines; and it is further ordained that an Account of the 
Experiments made on those Plants reputed poisonous should be 
annually sent to the Royal Society and to the College of Physi- 
cians in London. 

3d, That the room on the ground-floor of the principal 
Messuage, with an apartment at the end of it, be appropriated 
for the reading of Lectures on Botany, and for the use of the 
Reader; that the unfinished room above-stairs be set apart for 
the reception of Books on Botany and other Sciences relating 
thereto; and also of a Hortua Siccus or Collection of dried 
Plants; and the tapestry room above-stairs be for the use of the 
Governors when they meet there, and that the plaister building 
below be in part pulled down, and fitted up to make a suitable 
apartment and bed-chamber for the Curator to reside in. 

4th, That every Reader for the time being shall be such a 
proficient in Botany and so well qualified in learning as to be 
able to read Lectures on the same in Latin or English, and shall 
read such Lectures during the months of April, May, June and 
July as often in each week, and at such times of the day as will 
least interfere with other public business of the said University, 
and as shall' be appointed by the said Governors and Visitors or 
the major part of them, and that every such Reader shall also be 
able to make proper experiments to find out and ascertain the 
qualities of Plants; and it is hoped and desired that the Professor 
of Physic for the time being and others of the University will 
give their assistance therein for the public benefit. 

5th, That every Curator of the said Botanic Garden for the 
time being be a person well skilled in the systems of Botany and 



251 

fit to be intrusted with the care of the Garden ; and as so much 
depends on his skill, care and diligence, it is thought fit that such 
Curator should for his encouragement have a salary of one hun- 
dred pounds a year, and it is humbly recommended to the Uni- 
versity for their concurrence in providing such an allowance. 

6th, That no person shall be allowed to walk in the said 
Garden on Sundays, nor on any other days unless attended by 
the Curator or one of his servants, except Masters of Arts and 
persons of superior Degrees at seasonable times of the day; and 
that no person whatever be permitted to gather or take away any 
Plants, Flowers, Seeds or specimens of Plants, but by permission 
of the Curator. 

7th, That on the days when Lectures shall be read by the 
said Reader, the Students who attend those Lectures may be 
permitted to view the Plants growing in the said Garden for 
the space of an hour after the Lectures are over, under the 
inspection of the Reader or Curator or one of their servants, who 
are to be careful that no irregularities be committed; for the 
better prevention whereof all persons being once guilty of such 
irregularities shall be excluded the Garden until they have made 
a proper submission and given such assurances as shall be judged 
sufiicient not to misbehave for the future. 

Dr. Walker's Will. 

In the Name of God. Amen. I Richard Walker, Vice- 
Master of Trinity College in Cambridge, of perfect mind and 
memory, do make this my last Will and Testament in manner 
and form following: — First and above all, I recommend my soul 
to the mercy of God my Maker, hoping forgiveness and a joyful 
resurrection through Christ my Redeemer, desiring my body to 
be decently buried at the discretion of my Executors hereafter 
mentioned: Imprimis, I give, devise and bequeath to the Master, 
Fellows and Scholars of Trinity College in Cambridge, and 
their successors for ever, all that my quit-rent of ten pounds and 
two-pence, or some such sum, per annum, issuing out of the college 
manor at Wheston in the County of Leicester^ sometime the 
Estate of Thomas Allen, Clerk, now purchased by me at the price 
of two hundred and sixty-five pounds, for a perpetual annuity to be 

6—2 



252 

given by the Master, Vice-Master and Senior Dean of the said 
college for the time being, or by any two of them, to one or 
more poor scholars of the said college, as shall appear to them 
best deserring for their regular behaviour and proficiency in 
their studies, when they oflfer in the college for their Grace to 
proceed Bachelors of Arts: In trust these electors shall dispose of 
the said annuities in money or books as they shall judge best for 
encouraging other Scholars in these qualifications, which purchase 
cost me two hundred and sixty-five pounds, (see purchase-deed): 
Item, I give, devise and bequeath to the Chancellor, Masters and 
Scholars of the University of Cambridge, and their successors, 
for ever, all that my freehold mansion, house, garden and tene- 
ments in Free School Lane, in the Parish of Saint Edward's, in 
Cambridge: Also, to them and their successors, all that leasehold 
tenement and garden in Slaughter-house Lane, in the Parish of 
Saint Edward's, together with the garden-ground over against 
Hog-hill, formerly called Tainter's Yard, in the Parish of Saint 
Bene't, as held of the Corporation of Cambridge for the remain- 
der of a lease of forty years, running from Michaelmas seventeen 
hundred and fifty-seven, during my right and title therein, (about 
that time purchased by me of Richard Whish, Vintner, at Cam- 
bridge J for and towards a public Botanic Garden for the use of 
the said University, subject to such regulations and rules as are 
mentioned in my Donation thereof, approved by the Right 
Honourable Lord Hard wick. Lord High Steward of the said 
University, now in the hands of the Vice-Chancellor, and more 
particularly mentioned in my account of the Garden, printed 
in the year 1763 : 

Item, I give, devise, and bequeath, to the Master, Fellows 
and Scholars of Trinity College above-mentioned, and to their 
successors for ever, all my free and copyhold estates at Swa- 
sey, in the County of Cambridge, as now let by me to John 
Anderson of Swasey, at the yearly rent of one hundred and 
twenty-three pounds, (which has cost me in purchase and repairs 
since above three thousand pounds,) for and towards any public 
use or uses that the Master and senior Bursar shall think proper 
for the said College, but not for any private purpose whatsoever 
that any selfish Fellow may crave or importune for, recommend- 
ing frugality in order to support our laudable improved dividend : 



253 

But I cannot help charging this my estate at Swasey with the 
two following annuities, namely, to my nephew Ralfe Oale, now 
or late Supervisor of Excise at Fenwith in Cumberland, twenty 
pounds in the year during his natural life, and also to my niece 
Anne, sister to the said Ralfe, now wife as I am told of ■ 
Cook, during her natural life, twenty pounds in the year, nature 
more than their deserts to me require this, those two annuities 
to be paid to receipts of their own handwriting : — yerte 

natural relation more than their disregard to me 
in marrying themselves, as their relation to me requires me, not 
their utter disregard of my advice in marrying themselves, not 
only without but contrary thereto. 

I also subject my whole personal estate to the payment of 
the following legacies, namely, to my generous patrons and best 
friends, William Greaves, Esquire, of Fulborn, and Dorothy 
Beaupre Greaves, his wife, two hundred pounds for and towards 
any improvements they shall choose to make at their estate at 
Beaupre Hall, in Norfolk, in memory of the most agreeable 
entertainment I formerly had at that place from my good friend 
Beaupre Bdl, Esquire, father of the said Mrs. Greaves : I also 
give to my good friend Mr Stephen Whisson, now our worthy 
Bursar at Trinity College, twenty pounds and my Graham^s 
watch : I also give to Mr Thomas Hardhy, of TJpwell, ten pounds, 
hoping he will continue to give a true and particular account of 
the annual amount of tithes at Upwell, with the necessary out- 
goings and arrears thereof, and continue collecting the same as he 
has hitherto done for me, and to deliver such accounts to my Exe- 
cutors at the time of my death : I also give to my man-servant, 
William Read, ten pounds in the year, for three years from the 
day of my death, if' he lives so long: I also give to my bed- 
maker, Elizabeth Randale, all my wearing apparel and linen at the 
time of my death, and ar legacy of twenty pounds, for her great 
care of me in my old age : Lastly, I do make, constitute, and 
appoint William Greaves and Stephen Whisson, both above- 
mentioned. Executors of this my last Will, desiring them to take 
the first opportunity to examine my books and papers of accounts, 
and to call in all my rents, debts, and dues coming to me, and 
after deducting and paying all just demands that I may owe to 
others, I make the above Trinity College my residuary Legatees 



254 

to this my last Will ; I hope that will amount to a considerable 
sum, which I give to be disposed of as the Master and senior 
Bursar shall think fit for the College. 

Richard Walker. 

Signed, sealed, published, and declared, by the said Testator, 
Richard Walker, as and for his last Will and Testament, in the 
presence of us who, at his request, in his presence, and in the 
presence of each other, have hereunto subscribed our names as 
witnesses, this fourteenth of January, one thousand seren hun- 
dred and sixty-four. 

Charles Claydon, 
Sa¥il Jackson, 
William Abbey. 

June 25th, 1766. 

Appeared personally, The Reverend John Waterhouse, of 
Bow Lane, in the Parish of Saint Mary, Aldermary, London, 
Clerk, and the Reverend Thomas Higgins, of Paternoster Row, 
in the Parish of Saint Gregory, London, Clerk, and being 
severally sworn on the Holy Evangelists to depose the truth, 
made oath as follows : — That they well knew and were acquainted 
with the Reverend Richard Walker, Doctor in Divinity, late 
Vice-Master of Trinity College, in Cambridge, deceased, for up- 
wards of six years before his death, which happened, as they 
these deponents have been informed and beUeve, in the month 
of December last ; that such their knowledge of and acquaintance 
with the said deceased arose by these deponents being Students in 
Trinity College aforesaid, of which the said deceased was Vice- 
Master as aforesaid, and these deponents, each speaking for 
himself, swear and depose that they are well acquainted with the 
said deceased's manner and character of writing and subscribing 
his name, having often seen the said deceased write and subscribe 
his name, and that having now, with care and attention, viewed and 
perused the annexed paper- writing purporting to be and contain 
the last Will and Testament of the said deceased, bearing date 
in the attestation on the execution thereof, the fourteenth day of 
January, one thousand seven hundred and sixty-four, and having 
the following interlineations, notes^ or memorandums in the said 
Willy to wit, an interlineation of the words ''at price 265 



256 

pounds/' between the elerenth and twelfth lines of the first side 
of the said Will, reckoning from the top thereof; also the words 
'' and more particularly mentioned in my account of the Garden 
printed in the year 1763," after the word " Chancellor" on the 
thirty-first line of the first side of the said Will, reckoning as 
before, also the word "Bursar" interlined between the thirty-sixth 
and thirty-seventh lines of the said first side of the said Will, reck- 
oning as before ; also the words " not content with his improved 
dividend," wrote in the margin opposite to the last clause in the 
said first side of the said Will ; also the words " natural relation 
more than their disregard to me in marrying themselves," and 
the words, "as their' relation to me requires me, not their 
utter disregard of my advice in marrying themselves, not only 
without but contrary thereto," wrote at the bottom of the said 
first side of the said Will ; also the words " receipts of," inter- 
lined over the last line of the said first side of the said Will ; also 
the words " my Graham's watch," wrote on and towards the 
end of the ninth line of the second side of the said Will, reckon- 
ing from the top thereof ; also the word " just," wrote over the 
obliterated word " such," between the twenty-third and twenty- 
fourth lines of the said second side of the said Will, reckoning as 
before ; and also the words, " I hope that will amount to a con- 
siderable sum, which I give to be disposed of as the Master and 
senior Bursar shall think fit for the College," wrote at the end 
of the said Will, under the last clause thereof, and over the 
attestation on the execution of the said Will, and the deceased^s 
subscription thereto, they these deponents do in their con- 
sciences verily believe the ssdd several before-recited interline- 
ations, notes, or memorandums, in the said Will, to be all totally 
wrote by and to be of the proper handwriting of him, the said 
Richard Walker, deceased. John Watbrhouse, 

Thomas Higgins. 

The day aforesaid the said Reverend John Waterhonse, 
Clerk, and the Reverend Thomas Higgins, Clerk, were sworn to 
the truth of the before-written affidavit before me, and Coltee 
Ducarel, Surrogate, present. G. Gostung, N. P. 



Extracted by George Gostling, 
Proctor at Doctors' Commons. 



} 



256 



Dr. Walker* a B(ynd to the Chancellor, Masters and Scholars. 

Enow all men by these presents, that I Richard Walker, Doctor 
in Divinity and Vice-Master of Trinity College in the Uni- 
yersity of Cambridge, am held and firmly bound unto the 
Chancellor, Masters and Scholars of the said University in 
the sum of £3000 of good and lawful money of Great 
Britain, to be paid to the said Chancellor, Masters and 
Scholars, their certain attornies, successors or assignees, for 
which payment well and faithfully to be made I bind myself, 
my heirs, executors and administrators, in and for the whole 
firmly by these presents, sealed with my seal, dated the 
18th day of February, in the year of our Lord 1764. 

Whbrbas the above-bounden Richard Walker hath by Indentures 
of lease and release, bearing date respectively the 24th and 25th 
days of August, 1762, conveyed, settled and assured unto the 
Chancellor, Masters and Scholars of the said University and 
their successors, a certain capital messuage or tenement, garden- 
ground and other freehold and leasehold premises in Cambridge 
aforesaid in trust, to be employed and made use of as a public 
Botanic Garden for the use and benefit of the said University, 
under the direction and government of such persons, and for such 
purposes, and subject to such statutes, orders and regulations 
as the said Richard Walker has already, or the governors 
therein appointed shall hereafter make by the said Indentures 
of lease and release, reference being thereunto had, may 
more fully appear. And whereas the said Chancellor, Masters 
and Scholars, at the special instance and request of the said 
Richard Walker, did by Grace passed in Congregation on the 
11th day of February instant agree that their several vintners 
thereinafter to be elected should pay to the University Chest 
the yearly sum of sixty pounds, and that twenty pounds 
part of the said sixty pounds should be applied to the use 
of the Botanic Garden, in consideration of which the said 
Richard Walker did and doth hereby agree, either by deed 
or deeds in his life, or by his last Will and Testament, well and 
sufficiently to settle and assure unto the said Chancellor, Masters 
and Scholars, and their successors for ever, one annuity or clear 



257 

yearly sum of fifty pounds, free of all taxes and deductions 
whatsoever, to be charged upon and issuing out of a sufficient 
part of the freehold real estates of the said Richard Walker, in 
trust, for the further improvements of the said Botanic Garden, 
under and subject to the restrictions set forth in the said Inden- 
ture of release, and so long only a^ the said premises shall be 
kept up as a public Botanic Garden according to the said 
Richard Walker's intention. 

Now the condition of this obligation is such, that if the 
above-bounden Richard Walker do and shall by any deed or 
deeds in his life-time, or by his last Will and Testament, or 
otherwise, well and sufficiently settle and assure unto the s£ud 
Chancellor, Masters and Scholars, and their successors for ever, 
one annuity or clear yearly sum of fifty pounds, free of all taxes 
and deductions whatsoever, to be charged and issuing out of a 
sufficient part of the freehold real estates of the said Richard 
Walker, in trust for the further improvement of the said Botanic 
Garden, under and subject to the restrictions set forth in the said 
recited Indenture of release, then this obligation to be void and 
of no effect, otherwise to be and remain in full force and virtue. 

Richard Walker. 

Sealed and delivered (being first duly stamped) in the 
presence of 

Wm. Mott, Notary Pub. 
J. Appleyard. 

9 

2. Lord Maynard'8 Legacy. 

Charles Lord Viscount Maynard left by Will, dated Feb. 13, 
1775, five hundred pounds to Thomas Maynard, Esq. (afterwards 
Sir Thomas Heselrige, Bart), the Rev. Henry Hubbard and the 
Rev. John (afterwards Archdeacon) Law in trust, for erecting 
or beautifying any new building in the University of Cambridge, 
or for the use of the Botanic Garden. 

The money was invested in the purchase of stock, 3 per cent, 
reduced Bank Annuities ; and the interest, as it became due, was 
laid out in the purchase of other like stock, and added to the 
principal till Nov. 19, 1788, when the stock was sold and the 



258 

produce, amounting to £745. 18^. 4cd., was paid to the then 
Vice-Chancellor, Dr. Barnes, towards an intended new building 
opposite the Senate-House. It being found that this building 
was not likely to be erected so soon as was expected, the money 
was paid back to the trustees, and again invested by them in 
3 per cent, stock reduced Bknk. Annuities. 

A Grace was passed by the Senate, Feb. 11, 1807, for ap- 
plying the interest to the use of the Botanic (rarden ; and the 
stock, amounting to £1,990. 9^. 6d., was thereupon transferred 
into the names of the Chancellor, Masters and Scholars. By a 
subsequent purchase of stock the amount has been increased to 
£2,000. 

8. Benefaction of Mr, Betham. 

The Indenture, made May 2, 1783, between the Rev. Ed- 
ward Betham, Fellow of Eton College and Rector of Great 
Greenford, Middlesex, of the one part, and the Chancellor, 
Masters and Scholars of the University of the other part, re- 
cites that the said Edward Betham had transferred into the 
names of the said Chancellor, Masters and Scholars the sum of 
£2,000. 3 per cent, reduced Bank Annuities, with a view to the 
better support and maintenance of the Botanic Garden in the 
University. 

It is then declared and agreed that the Chancellor, Masters 
and Scholars may, at any time, sell and dispose of the said Bank 
Annuities and lay out the money arising therefrom in the pur- 
chase of lands or tenements of good title, and free from incum- 
brances; and that they shall then pay the clear yearly rents 
and profits of such lands and tenements unto the Governors or 
Visitors of the Botanic Garden for the time being, to be by them 
specially and particularly applied towards defraying the expense 
of labourers to be employed in the said Botanic Garden, and not 
for the erecting, building and makbg of stoves, hothouses and 
greenhouses, or anything belonging or appertaining thereunto, or 
for paying stipends or salaries to any Reader on Botany, or to 
any Curator or Superintendent of the said Botanic Garden, or 
other officer employed therein or belonging thereto, or to or for 
any other use or purpose whatsoever. In the meantime, and 
until such purchase shall be made, the Chancellor, Masters and 



259 

Scholars are to pay the clear yearly divideiids of the same Bank 
Annuities unto the said Governors and Visitors of the Botanic 
Garden, to be applied by them as before-mentioned. 

4. Purchase of the New Botanic Garden. 

In the year 1831, or thereabout, the site of the New Botanic 
Garden was conveyed to the Chancellor, Masters and Scholars 
of the University under the authority of a private Act of Par- 
liament, 1 Will lY. c. 5, in consideration of the sum of <£2,2 10. 8^., 
and of a piece of land of about seven acres in extent given by 
way of exchange, upon trust for the Governors and Visitors 
of the Botanic Garden for the time being, to the intent that the 
said Governors and Visitors should appropriate and set apart the 
whole, or such part or parts thereof as they should think eligible 
and expedient, as a public Botanic Garden for the use and 
benefit of the University, in lieu and substitution of the Old 
Botanic Garden, with ground sufficient for the sites of all such 
houses, buildings, conservatories, hot-houses, green-houses, and 
other erections, buildings, conveniences, and apparatus as should 
be proper or necessary; and should lay out such Garden upon 
such plan, order or design as the said Governors and Visitors for 
the time being should think most advisable and best adapted for 
the objects and purposes of a public Botanic Garden, and for 
most effectually promoting the study of Botany in the Univer- 
sity; and should employ and make use of, or permit to be 
employed and made use of, the said site, or such part or parts 
thereof as should be appropriated as aforesaid, for a public 
Botanic Garden for the use and benefit of the University in lieu 
and substitution of the Old Botanic Garden. 

The Act declares the New Botanic Garden to be under the 
direction, government, management and superintendence of the 
same persons, and subject to the same orders and regulations, 
and with all such powers and provisions for the maintenance, sup- 
port and conduct thereof, as the Old Garden. 

The Act empowers the Chancellor, Masters and Scholars to 
purchase any parcels of land contiguous to the New Botanic 
Garden, which should be deemed necessary or eligible to be 
added thereto, or for making any roads or approaches to the 
said Garden. 



260 

The Act farther empowers the Chancellor^ Masters and 
Scholars to sell and dispose of the site of the Old Botanic Gar- 
den, or of any part or parts thereof, in such parcels and at such 
prices, and either by public auction or private contract, as the 
Chancellor, Masters and Scholars should think fit; and until such 
sale or sales to lease the whole or any part or parts of the site ; 
and it directs that all sums of money which should arise from 
such sales, and all monies and rents which should be received 
under leases granted of the whole or any part of the site should 
be applied by the Chancellor, Masters and Scholars, in the first 
place, towards payment of the expences of obtaining the said 
Act and carrying the same into execution, and towards the pay- 
ment or re-payment to themselves of the said sum of <f 2210. 8^., 
and also the purchase-money for any lands, tenements or heredi- 
taments which should be purchased by them under the powers 
of the said Act ; and that the residue of the said monies should 
be paid to the Governors and Visitors of the Botanic Garden for 
the time being, to be by them laid out in and towards the 
making, forming and completing the New Garden, and the erec- 
tion of all necessary houses, conservatories, hot-houses, green- 
houses, and other buildings for the same, and in maintaining, 
supporting, managing, conducting and keeping up the New 
Garden and the buildings thereof, and generally for the uses and 
purposes of the Garden, in such manner as the Governors and 
Visitors for the time being should judge expedient. 

5. Appropriation to the University of the Site of the Old 

Botanic Garden. 

A Syndicate having been appointed by Grace, Feb. 2, 1853, 
to consider whether any and what steps should be taken for 
appropriating to the University the site of the Old Botanic 
Garden, and to confer with the Governors of the Botanic Garden 
thereon; and the Governors having expressed their willingness 
to give up to the University their rights in the site of the Old 
Botanic Garden on receiving for the use of the New Botanic 
Garden the sum of £3,448. 4^. 4d (the difference between the 
value of the site and the sum already expended by the Chancel- 
lor, Masters and Scholars on account of the purchase of the New 



261 

Botanic Garden and its approaches) a Orace was passed March 
11, 1853, to confirm the said agreement with the Governors, 
and to authorise the Syndicate to take such steps as they might 
deem necessary to carry it into effect. 

Upon application to the Court of Chancery an order was 
made by the Court on July 29, 1853, directing that the arrange- 
ment entered into by the University with the Governors should 
be carried into effect; and for that purpose it was ordered that 
the Chancellor, Masters and Scholars do pay the Governors the 
sum of £3,448. 4«. 4d, and all their costs, charges and expences 
of and relating to the said arrangement, and of and relating to 
the application to the Court; and thereupon it was further 
ordered that the land and premises constituting the site of the 
Old Botanic Garden be and continue vested in the Chancellor, 
Masters and Scholars released and absolutely discharged of and 
from the trusts created with respect thereto. 



262 



XII, Foundations of the Rbv. John Hulsb. 

1. The following is the Willy with Extracts from four of the 
Codicils^ which include all the Testator's directions relative 
to the University. 

In the Name of God. Amen ! I John Hulsb, of El worth, 
in the county and diocese of Chester, Clerk, and once a Mem- 
ber of the College of Saint John the Evangelist in Cambridge, 
though at this time in a very infirm state of health, and for 
many years past afflicted with the stone and the most acute 
and extreme pain, yet of sound mind, memory and understanding, 
(praised be the great and gracious Author of my being for the 
same and for all his other undeserved mercies) on a due conside- 
ration of the certainty of death and the uncertain time thereof, do 
make and publish this my last Will and Testament in manner 
and form following : 

And first, I desire with the deepest reverence and submis- 
sion to resign my soul into the hands of Almighty God, the 
greatest and the best of beings, whenever his all-wise Providence 
shall call for it, humbly relying (through the gracious influence 
of his Holy Spirit) on the merits, mediation and satisfaction of 
his blessed Son Jesus Christ, our only Saviour and Redeemer, 
for the forgiveness of my sins and a glorious immortality, and 
my body I commend to the grave to be interred in such manner 
as I shsdl by a note under my hand in writing direct, and for 
want thereof in a decent but private manner, at the discretion of 
my Executors. And as to such worldly estate as it hath pleased 
the Divine goodness so graciously of late years to bless me with, 
I do order and dispose of the same in the following manner, and 
it is my Will and meaning that the same shall be settled in due 
form of law, and shall go and be applied to the following iiitents 
and purposes, and to no other end or purpose whatsoever. I give 
Estate in and doviso all that my Close, Field or parcel of Land, lying and 
being in Newton, near Middlewich, in the said county of Chester, 
commonly called or known by the name of Ashfield, and contain- 
ing by estimation yery near six statute acres (which said Field is 



263 

now in lease to my nephew, Mr. Ralph Leeke of Middlewich 
aforesaid, and also all that my Messuage, Cottage or Tenement Newton. 
in Newton aforesaid in lease to John Wagg, and lately divided 
into five small dwellings, and now in the holding or occupation 
of the said John Wagg, his undertenants or assigns ; And also 
all that my Messuage, Cottage and Tenement, with the Garden 
thereto belonging in Newton aforesaid, late in the holding or 
occupation of John Bentily, his undertenants or assigns, now 
divided into three dwellings, and leased to John Griffiths for 
three lives, and in the occupation of him, his undertenants 
or assigns, together with a newly erected Messuage or Cottage 
thereto lately added by the said John Griffiths, containing twelve 
feet in length, and eleven feet in breadth : And also all that 
barn in Newton aforesaid, adjoining to the last-mentioned Mes- 
suage or Tenement, and now in the holding of the said Ralph 
Leeke ; And also all that my other Messuage, Cottage and Tene- 
ment in Newton aforesaid, consisting of two dwellings with the 
Garden thereto belonging, all now in the holding or occupation 
of John Corke, his undertenants or assigns ; And also all that 
my other Messuage and Tenement, now in three dwellings, with 
the garden thereto belonging, in Newton aforesaid, two of which 
dwellings are in lease for three lives to the before-mentioned 
John Griffiths, and now or lately in the occupation of John 
Johnson and George Wunwright, and the third such dwelling is 
in lease to Joseph Tomkinson, and in the occupation of Richard 
Whishaw ; And also all that my other Messuage, Cottage and 
Tenement, with the Garden thereto belonging, in Newton afore- 
said, at this time in two dwellings in the holding or occupation of 
John Yarwood and James Lea, and in lease to John Griffiths 
before mentioned ; And also all that my other Messuage Cottage 
and Tenement, with the Garden thereto belonging, in Newton 
aforesaid, now or lately in the holding or occupation of John 
Egerton, and in lease for one life to Peter Yoxal ; And also all 
that my other Messuage, Cottage and Tenement, consbting of two 
Dwellings with the Garden thereto belonging, in Newton afore- 
said, now in lease to William Shufflebotham ; And also all that 
my Messuage or Dwelling-house and Tenement, with the 
Garden and Outbuildings and Appurtenances thereto belonging, 
situate, lying and being in Middlewich aforesaid, in a certidn MiddL^ch. 



264 

street there called Wheelock Street, now in the holding or 
occupation of Richard Reeves, his undertenants or assigns, 
lately held by Charles Sherratt, and then known by the sign of 
the '' Black Lion/' (subject nevertheless as to the last-mentioned 
Messuage with the Appurtenances to a conditional power of sale 
thereof hereinafter vested in my Trustees) ; And also all that my 
Garden or Plot of Land in Middlewich aforesaid, adjoining to 
the court-yard of a house there, formerly known by the name of 
the " Black Swan," now the inheritance of David Holt ; And also 
all that my moiety of the Passage or Gannel and Way leading 
from the street up to the said garden, which garden and 
moiety of passage are now rented by the said David Holt ; And 
all other my Messuages, Tenements, Lands and Hereditaments 
whatsoever, situate, lying and being in Newton and Middlewich 
Trustees. aforcsaid, or either of them, to my said Nephew Ralph Leeke, 

ThoniMVaw- v x x 

dreyan^otai and my good friends Mr. Thomas Yaw drey of Crannage in the 
^jjMfflugh, County of Chester, and the Rev. Mr. John Smith of Nantwich in 
Btotertknd *^® samo Couuty, Clerk, for the term of ninety-nine years, if my 
my"^8te«'* brothers Hugh Hulse, Thomas Hulse, William Hulse, Robert 
ilndVim^°' Hulse and Randle Hulse, and my sisters Jane Jenkins and Ann 
and^^h Tompson, and the said Ralph Leeke or any of them, shall so 
so long live, long livc; lu trust nevertheless to permit and suffer the said Hugh 
otthB Hulse to receive and take the rents and profits of the said Pre- 

brothers ^ ^ ^ - * ^ 

mises during so long of the said term, determinable as aforesaid, 
as he shall happen to live, and from and after his decease, in 
trust, to permit and suffer the said Thomas Hulse to receive and 
take the rents and profits of the Premises during so long of the 
said term, determinable as aforesaid, as he shall happen to live, 
and after his death, in trust, to permit and suffer the said William 
Hulse to receive and take the rents and profits of the said pre- 
mises during so long of the residue of the said term as he shall 
happen to live, and from and after his decease, in trust, to per- 
mit and suffer the said Robert Hulse to receive and take the 
rents and profits of the premises during so long of the residue of 
the said term, determinable as aforesaid, as he shall happen to 
live, and from and after his decease, in trust, to permit and suffer 
the said Randle Hulse to receive and take the rents and profits 
of the premises during so long of the residue of the said term, 
determinable as aforesaid, as he shall happen to live, and from 



265 

and after his decease, in trust, to permit and suffer the said Jane »d>asten, 
Jenkins to receive and take the rents and profits of the premises 
during so long of the said term, determinable as aforesaid, as she 
shall happen to live, and from and after her decease, in trust, to 
permit and suffer the said Ann Tompaon to receive and take the 
rents and profits of the premises during so long of the residue of 
the said term, determinable as aforesaid, as she shall happen to 
live, and from and after her decease, in trust, to permit and 
suffer the said Ralph Leeke to receive and take the rents and and Raiph 
profits of the premises, during so long of the residue of the said ^ * 
term, determinable as aforesaid, as he shall happen to live, and 
from and after the end, expiration or other determination of 
the said term of ninety-nine years, determinable as aforesaid, I 
give and devise the same premises to, and to the use of the then to uw 

UniveKitv 

University of Cambridge for ever, for the purposes hereinafter 
expressed, that is to say, I will and direct that the clear rents, 
issues and profits of the same premises in Newton and Middle- 
wich shall be divided into six equal parts, of which four such 
six parts shall be paid or fi^iven to the person beins^ a member of to be divided 

^ A o between 

the said University, to be from time to time under the directions niasertator 

. , • . and Lecturer. 

of this my WiU adjudged the author of the best Dissertation on 
the subjects hereinafter for that purpose appointed. One other 
such sixth part shall be given or paid every year as an augmen- 
tation of his salary, and for his own use to the person, being also 
a member of the said University, to be from time to time ap- 
pointed to the Lectureship hereinafter founded, and who is to 
preach annually twenty Sermons agreeably to this my Will, and 
the remaining sixth equal part of such rents and profits shall go 
and be paid in augmentation of the salary or provision herein- 
after given or made from my Estate in Clive, for the foundation 
of a fourth Scholarship, on the decease of the said Ralph Leeke^ 
as it is expressly allowed and declared to be lawful to leave and 
devise Lands and Tenements, or else to charge the same for 
such uses as are above mentioned, when left to either of the 
Universities in England by a particular clause in a late Statute, 

^ N.B. — This clause as to the Scholarship from Gliye is hereinafterwards made 
whoUy void (see page 303), and every Endowment that is annexed to it (see page 
282) shall for the future be appropriated wholly to the Lectureship and the re- 
8]>ective profits be received annually by the Lecturer, as an augmentation to his salary 
for ever. J Hulse. 

VOL. III. 7 



266 

called the Mortmain Act, made or euacted in the Reign of the 
late King George the Second, in the year of our Lord one 
thoasand seven hundred and thirty-six. And whereas there is 
Death of the great roason to fear that not all or any of my said brothers 
absencefrom Hugh, Thomas or William are now livine, having had no certain 
account, either from or concerning any one of them since first 
they went to sea, in the year one thousand seven hundred and 
forty, and the last accounts of them received, soon after they set 
sail, were only melancholy though uncertain rumours of their 
deaths, and my youngest brother Randle has been resident in 
Maryland for several years; therefore, under that apprehension, 
and to prevent any confusion which might otherwise arise in my 
affairs, my will is, that none of my said four brothers, Hugh, 
Thomas, William or Bandle, shall be entitled to have or claim as 
against any person or persons whatsoever any of the rents, issues 
or profits of my Estates, or anything out of the same that shall 
arise or become due or payable the Lady-day or Michaelmas 
which shall next happen after his or their return or coming to 
England, and entering his or their claim under this my Will, by 
notice subscribed by him or them so claiming as aforesaid, 
authenticated by affidavit, and delivered to my said Trustees, or 
the survivors or survivor of them, or the Executors or Adminis- 
trators of such survivor, or at any time or times preceding such 
of the same feast days; and until such return or arrival and 
notice as aforesaid, my same brothers Hugh, Thomas, William 
and Randle, are to be esteemed as if naturally dead, and my 
said Estates, and the rents and profits thereof, are to go accord- 
ingly: Provided always that such of my said brothers Hugh, 
Thomas, William and Randle, as shall not within the space of 
seven years from my death arrive in England, and make such 
incapacitoted claim as aforcsaid, shall from and after the expiration of the said 
yean^^™ sovon yoars be totally incapacitated to take any benefit under 
' this my Will, and the devises and bequests over shall take place 
as if he or they were actually dead; provided also that none of 
or by extra- my Said brothers or sisters shall, whilst resident or living out of 
dence. that part of Great Britain called England, be entitled to any 
benefits under this my Will, but during such extraneous resi- 
dence, or being out of England, the devises or bequests over 
shall take place as if he or they were naturally dead, but may 



267 

nevertheless revive in them on his or their return to England, 
so always that this clause shall not be construed to alter in any 
respect the next preceding clause of a total incapacity in the case 
therem expressed. I give and devise ail that my Capital, Mes- S^^,,^ 
suage or Mansion and Dwelling House in the Township of Sand- 
bach aforesaid, wherein I now dwell, commonly called or known 
by the name of Elworth Hall, together with the Outbuildings, 
Garden and the Lands thereto adjoining, consisting of about 
twenty-two statute acres, which 1 now occupy, therewith ; And 
also all that my Messuage and Tenement with the Lands and Here- 
ditaments thereto belonging, containing one hundred and thirty- 
two acres of Land and upwards, all situate, lying and being in the 
Townships of Sandbach and Brad wall, in the said County of ofBndwaii. 
Chester, or in one of them, and late in the holding or occupation 
of my tenant John Eachus and now of Philip Wood, his under- 
tenants or assigns : And also all those my two Fields or Parcels 
of Land in Sandbach aforesaid, commonly called the Marsh-Croft 
and the little Kibble-Ditch, with the appurtenances now in the 
holding or occupation of Samuel Daniels ; And also all that my 
Lane or Cart-way, called Cooksnal Lane, leading from the second 
gate behind the Hall of Elworth towards Sandbach aforesaid, 
and extending to the Lane that leads from the end of the Town 
of Sandbach to Brad wall Green ; And all other my Messuages, 
Tenements, Lands and Hereditaments whatsoever, which are 
situate, lying and being within the several Townships of Sand- 
bach and Bradwall aforesaid or either of them, to the said 
Ralph Leeke, John Smith and Thomas Yawdrey, and the survivors 
and survivor of them, and to the Executors, Administrators and J^iS^^h** 
Assigns of such survivor for the term of two hundred years, vawS^™*' 
upon the trusts, and to and for the several intents and purposes ^^ ^ ^^" 
hereinafter expressed and declared concerning the same; And 
from and after the end or other sooner determination of the said 
term of two hundred years, and subject thereto and to thQ 
trusts thereof, I give and devise the said premises in Sandbach 
and Bradwall unto and to the use of the said Universitv of totheuni- 
Cambridge for ever, for the purposes hereinafter expressed. 

And whereas it was always my sincere desire and resolution 
to have settled a considerable share of my Estate on my brother 
Robert, (now too probably my eldest surviving brother) could I ^S^e""^*® 

7—2 



268 

have been bat well assured of his prudent care and enjoyment of 
the same ; And whereas it is but too notorious that my father 
left the same Estate in a most ruinous condition, and encumbered 
with a debt of seventeen hundred pounds (part of which, with 
unavoidable additions since, on account of the great want of ne- 
cessary buildings as well as very expensive repairs, and the 
impoverished state of the land itself, still lies very heavy upon 
it); from these circumstances I judge it will be for the true in- 
terest and quiet of my brothers to be provided for in the follow- 
ing manner — that is, by a proper and suitable Annuity with the 
receipt of the rents and profits of the premises in Newton and 
Middlewich rather than by the possession of the lands them- 
Annuity of sclvcs ; therefore I do hereby direct and declare that the said 

^30 to eldest ^ , 

brothei; term of two hundred years of and in the premises in Sandbach 
and Brad wall is so limited to the said Ralph Leeke, John Smith 
and Thomas Yawdrey as aforesaid, upon trust, that they or the 
survivors or survivor of them, his Executors, Administrators or 
Assigns, do and shall by and out of the rents, issues and profits 
thereof, in the first place, pay to my eldest brother for the time 
being resident in England, the clear annual sum of thirty pounds 
of lawful money of Great Britain, by two equal half-yearly 
payments on every twenty-fifth day of March and twenty-ninth 
day of September, so long as such brother or his assigns shall, 
by virtue of the limitations and conditions hereinbefore contained, 
be entitled to the rents and profits of the said hereinbefore 
devised premises in Newton and Middlewich, such annuity to 
commence from such of those days as shall first happen after 
my decease, and the first half-yearly payment thereof be made 
on the second of those days which will follow my death, except 
in the case of such commencement and payment being postponed 
for the purpose of discharging my debts and legacies as herein- 
after mentioned; And upon further trust, that they the said 
Jlalph Leeke, John Smith and Thomas VawdreyV or the sur- 
vivors or survivor of them, or the Executors, Administrators or 
Assigns of such survivor, do and shall thereout pay to such of 
Annuity of my brothers as shall be resident in England, and next in succes- 
brother. siou, to the routs and profits of the hereinbefore devised premises 
in Newton and Middlewich, according to the limitations and con- 
ditions aforesaid, one other like annuity of thirty pounds by 



269 

equal half-yearly payments at Lady-day and Michaelmas, until 
such next brother resident in England shall die, or shall succeed 
to the receipt of the rents and profits of the premises in Newton 
and Middlewich, or till such brother's title to such apparent or 
next presumptive succession shall be eventually postponed by the 
arrival in England of my other brothers, and his or their making 
such claim as aforesaid, the first of such half-yearly payments of 
the said last-mentioned annuity to commence from such time, 
and be made upon the same day as hereinbefore is prescribed 
with respect to the first-mentioned annuity to my eldest brother 
for the time being, and to be subject to the like contingency as 
to such payments being postponed: And from and after the 
death of all my said brothers, and likewise when and so soon as 
the first-mentioned annuity of thirty pounds shall cease to 
become payable to my eldest brother, for the time being resi- 
dent in England, then I do will and direct that in each or both 
of these cases an annual sum of thirty pounds for each shall 
commence payable out of the premises in Sandbach and Middle- Then for two 
wich for the foundation of two of the three Scholarships herein- mstJSin? 
after mentioned, for the son of a clergyman in Saint John'^s 
College, Cambridge, to be qualified and chosen in the same 
manner as the said three Scholars are hereinafter ordered and 
appointed, and to be subject to the like rules and regulations, 
and shall continue payable half-yearly on the days aforesaid, 
until such Scholars shall on the division of the premises in Sand- 
bach and Bradwall, into moieties as hereinafter is directed, on the 
determination of the said term of two hundred years, become 
entitled to one-sixth part of the same premises for his support, 
and no longer. And upon further trust, that they, the said 
Balph Leeke, John Smith and Thomas Vawdrey, or the sur- 
vivors or survivor of them, or the Executors or Administrators Annuities of 
of such survivor do and shall pay or deduct and retain out of Thomas vaw- 

/ • • r^ ^ dreyandJohu 

the yearly rents and profits of the premises in Sandbach and smith. 
Bradwall to or for the use of the ssdd Thomas Vawdrey during 
his life, and to and for the use of the said John Smith during 
his life in consideration of the esteem which I have for them, 
and of the trusts with which I have by this my Will invested 
them, two several annuities or yearly sums of ten pounds a-piece, 
payable to each of them half-yearly, on every twenty-fifth day 



270 

of March and twenty-ninth day of September ; the first of those 
payments to be made on such of those days as shall first happen 
after my decease : And also do and shall, by and out of the 
same rents and profits, pay to my good and faithful servant 
£30 to%iL- Elizabeth Holford, now wife of Thomas Plant, during her natural 
beUiHoiford. j^fg^ jj^ ^^^^ gj^^ gjjg^jj jjy^ j^ jjjy family and service at my decease, 

a life annuity or yearly sum of thirty pounds, to be likewise 
paid half-yearly, at Lady-day and Michaelmas, the commence- 
ment and first payment thereof to begin and be made on the 
same days as are hereinbefore fixed for the commencement and 
first half-yearly payment of the annuities to my brothers, sub- 
ject nevertheless to the like postponement in the case herein- 
after mentioned, such annuity to be paid during her natural life 
to the said Elizabeth Holford, over and above any other legacy, 
in money or otherwise, which I may herein or at any time 
hereafter give or leave to her ; And from and immediately after 
the death of the said Elizabeth Holford, or in case she shall not 
be in my family and service at my death, then I do direct that 
a like annual sum of thirty pounds shall commence, payable from 
the death of the said Elizabeth Holford, or in case she shall 
have left my service at the time of my decease, then from such 
day as her said annuity would have commenced had she lived 
with me, at her death by my Executors, Administrators or 
Assigns of such survivor, out of the rents and profits of the pre- 
schoiaSship. J^is^s in Saudbach and Bradwall, for the foundation and estab- 
lishment of another of the three beforementioned Scholarships, 
such other Scholarship to be governed by and subject to the 
same rules, orders and regulations as hereinafter are mentioned 
and contained respecting the said Scholarships, when the pre- 
mises in Sand bach and Bradwall shall come to be divided into 
moieties as aforesaid, at which time, and not sooner, the last-men- 
tioned annual sum of thirty pounds shall cease to be payable : And 
upon this further trust, that they the said Ralph Leeke, John Smith 
and Thomas Vawdrey, or the survivors or survivor of them, his 
Executors, Administrators or Assigns, do and shall out of the 
rents and profits of the premises in Sandbach and Bradwall, pay- 
to my other servants the following life annuities, that is to say, 
I will and direct, that in case the said Elizabeth Holford shall 
be in my family and service at my death, so that I shall keep 



271 

only two, at most three, other servants in my family, then that 
an annuity of six pounds shall be paid to my man-servant, or Annuity of 
m case oi my navmg at that time two men-servants, to mm servant. 
t;hat shall have been the longest in my service, provided 
such only or oldest man-servant shall have been in my family 
and service two years immediately previous to my death ; And 2,ndsi™t. 
another annuity of four pounds to the other man-servant (if more 
than one) who shall then have been the shortest time in my 
service, provided such his service shall not be less than two 
years immediately previous to my death ; and another annuity 
of two pounds shall be paid to my dairy-maid or under maid- ^3 to^JLw- 
servanty in case of her having lived in my family and service ■®'^*^^ 
two years immediately previous to my death ; but if any of my 
said servants (other than the said Elizabeth Holford) shall not 
have lived in my family and service at least two years immedi- 
ately previous to my decease, in that case, he, she or they fail- SSSTrSSSt- 
ing in that requisite, shall be paid an annuity for life of half the »»« servants. 
amount only of that to which he, she or they would respectively 
have been entitled had he, she or they performed such two years' 
service immediately previous to my death : And if it shall 
happen that the said Elizabeth Holford shall have left my family 
and service at my death, so that I shall then have four other 
domestic servants, two of them men and the other two women, 
in that case they shall be paid out of the rents and profits of the 
premises in Sandbach and Bradwall the following annuities, that 
is, such my man-servant who shall have been longest in my 
service, an annuity of five pounds, the other man-servant an 
annuity of four pounds; such my woman-servant who shall 
then have been the longest in my service, an annuity of two 
pounds, and the other such woman-servant an annuity of one 
pound, during their respective natural lives, all and every the 
said annuities to my servants to be payable half-yearly at Lady- 
day and Michaelmas, and to commence from and begin to be 
paid on the same days as hereinbefore prescribed with respect 
to my brother's annuities, subject to the like contingent postpone- 
ment. And upon further trust, that they the said Ralph Leeke, 
John Smith and Thomas Vawdrey, or the survivors or survivor 
of them, his Executors or Administrators, do and shall out of the 
same rents and profits pay to the clergyman for the time being, 



272 

£70 per an- hereinafter appointed to be called the Christian Advocate, and 
christSm^ whose office is also hereinafter more particularly described, an 
annual stipend or yearly sum of seventy pounds, by equal half- 
yearly payments on every twenty-fifth day of March and 
twenty-ninth day of September, such stipend or yearly sum to 
commence from and begin to be paid on the same days as are 
herein fixed in regard to the annuities hereinbefore provided for 
my brothers, subject to the like contingent postponement, and to 
continue payable until the Christian Advocate shall on the divi- 
sion of the premises in Sandbach and Brad wall into moieties on 
the determination of the said term of two hundred years by 
virtue of the proviso hereinafter for that purpose contained, 
become entitled to one such moiety, and no longer. And as to 
all the residue of the rents and profits which shall arise from the 
premises in Sandbach and Bradwall on the death of annuitants 
or otherwise howsoever, previous to such determination of the 
said term of two hundred years, and no longer, as above men- 
tioned, and are not otherwise disposed of by this my Will, I 
direct that the same residue and every part thereof shall go and 
be paid to the said clergyman to be called the Christian Advo- 
cate in augmentation of his said stipend, 
incaseofone But if it shall happen that I shall have only one brother 

brother only ,* * ^ 

S*1iSS*ati resident in England, m consequence whereof the provision of 
£30to^°^ thirty pounds per annum for the next brother will not be pay- 
able, I direct that such thirty pounds per annum, whilst any of 
my said brothers or their assigns shall be entitled to the rents 
and profits of the premises in Middlewich and Newton aforesaid, 
according to the limitations and conditions aforesaid, shall go and 
themainte- bc paid towards the founding or establishment of a third, that 
third Scholar- is, ouo of the thrco hcreinafter-mentioned Scholarships in Saint 
John's College in Cambridge, for the son of a clergyman as is 
more particularly hereinafter iippointed, but nevertheless the said 
provision of thirty pounds per annum may thereafter revive in 
favour of some of my brothers by the arrival and claim aforesaid, 
and in such case and so long as the same shall become payable to 
any of my said brothers, the same or any part thereof shall not 
be demandable for such Scholarship, but may again become pay- 
able to such Scholarship by the death of some of my brothers or 
the succession of some of them to the receipt of the rents and 



273 

profits of the premises in Newton and Middle wich. Provided 
always, and I do hereby direct and declare that on the death of 
all my brothers, trustees and servants, who shall by virtue of this 
my Will become entitled to Annuities payable from and charg^ed 
on the premises comprised in the said term of two hundred years, 
that term shall ^thenceforth cease and be absolutely void to all 
intents and purposes, anything herein contained to the contrary 
thereof in anywise notwithstanding. And as for and concerning 
all and singular the said premises in Sandbach and Bradwall, sandbachand 
from and after such time as the same shall vest in the said 
University of Cambridge in possession by determination of the 
said term of two hundred years according to the proviso last 
above written (the several Scholarships and the office of Christian 
Advocate hereinbefore-mentioned taking place in the mean time 
according to the directions aforesaid), my will is, that all and 
every the rents and profits thereof shall then be divided into two Two equal 
equal parts or moieties, and one such equal part or moiety shall 
yearly be disposed of and given by the Vice-Chancellor of the 
University of Cambridge, and by the Master or Head of Trinity 
College, and the Master of Saint John's College, whom I do 
hereby appoint as Trustees for the disposal of this and all the 
benefactions to the said University (except where I have herein 
otherwise ordered and appointed), or by any two of them, for and 
towards the maintenance and support of one such learned and one moiety 
ingenious person of the degree of Master of Arts or of Bachelor tian Advo- 
or Doctor of Divinity, and of the age of thirty years or upwards, 
and then resident in the said University as shall be by them or 
any two of them on Christmas-day, or within seven days after, 
thought the best qualified, and by them or any two of them suc- 
cessively elected for any term not exceeding five or six years, in 
order to prepare some proper and judicious answer or answers His office, 
every year to all such new and popular or other cavils and objections 
against the Christian or Revealed Religion, or against the Religion 
of Nature, as may in the opinion of the said last-mentioned 
Trustees or any two of them seem best or most proper to deserve 
or require an answer, whether the same be ancient or modern 
objections, but chiefly such as are most modern, and especially 
such as have appeared in the English language of late years 
against Christianity, and which may not seem to have received a 



274 

fall and sufficient answer, if any such there shall be, unto the year 
preceding such election, as likewise to be ready to satisfy any real 
scruples or objections in a private way that may be brought from 
time to time by any fair and candid inquirer against the same, 
such writer to be called The Christian Advocate, and such his 
written answer to be in English, and only against notorious infi- 
dels, whether Atheists or Deists, not descending to any particular 
controversies or sects amongst Christians themselves, except some 
new and dangerous error either of superstition or enthusiasm, as 
of Popery or Methodism, either in opinion or practice shall pre- 
vail, in which case only it may be necessary for that time to 
write or to reason against the same, and such treatise or treatises 
to be every year printed, the expence whereof shall be deducted 
out of the temporary stipend or salary of seventy pounds, and 
afterwards out of the rents and profits hereinbefore given or pro- 
vided for the said Christian Advocate, and the remainder of the 
same stipend or salary or rent and profits shall be paid or given 
every year to the several authors successively as a reward for the 
same by my Trustees above-mentioned, but no person shall be ever 
re-elected or at any time after he has once filled the said office 

mcSety!*' appointed thereto again. And the remaining moiety of all the 
said rents and profits of the premises in Sandbach and Bradwall 
shall be divided into three equal parts and paid equally every 
year towards the support and maintenance of the before-men- 

schSSl tioned three Scholars, who shall be Undergraduates in Saint 
John's College aforesaid and shall be born in the County Palatine 
of Chester, such Scholar to be elected by the Master and a 
majority of the senior Fellows of the said College on Christmas- 
day or in the first seven days after, and may be distinguished as 

Scholars' usual by the name of Hulse's Scholars, and to wear a cloth gown 

preferen^. with loug and open sleeves hanging down like those of Bachelors, 
and in case it should happen that a son of any clergyman who 
shall at any time officiate as curate to the Vicar of Sandbach, or 
next to him the son of any vicar or curate who shall then live 
and officiate in the Parish of Middlewich, as the proper minister 
or curate of Middlewich, or lastly of any minister or curate of 
Witton, or who shall reside and live in the town of Northwich or 
Witton, or the adjacent townships of Castle Northwich and Win- 
nington, and shall do the duty of the said chapel as the j)roper 



275 

minister of Witton (all of them in the said county of Chester), 
shall be admitted as a Scholar into the said College, such person 
being an Undergraduate shall have the preference and be elected 
before all others, and those born as above are to be elected in the 
order above-mentioned ; And in default of such persons then the 
son of any other clergyman who (that is which son) shall be born 
in either of the said parishes of Sandbach or Middlewich, or in 
the said Chapelry of Witton, shall have the preference ; And if 
none shall be admitted, then the son of any other clergyman 
shall be preferred who (that is which son) shall be born in the 
said County of Chester, and next in any of the four following 
Counties of Stafford, Salop, Derby or Lancaster, or lastly else- 
where in any other county or part of England, provided that it 
shall appear that the clergyman who is father to such Scholar is 
not if living, or if dead was not at his death possessed of any 
spiritual preferment of more than one hundred and forty pounds 
a year clear income, or whose income in every respect shall not 
exceed the clear yearly value of two hundred pounds in the whole; 
but if no son of any clergyman so entitled as aforesaid shall be 
elected into such Scholarship, the same shall be given to the son 
of some lay person whose clear yearly income does not if living, 
and if dead did not at the time of his death amount to more than 
two hundred pounds, and such son being born in the Counties of 
Chester, Stafford, Salop, Derby or Lancaster, the counties in 
that order having a preference, or lastly elsewhere in England, 
and such Scholar^ whether the son of a clergyman or layman, to 
be elected in manner aforesaid, shall continue to enjoy this my 
Benefaction until he shall take or shall be of standing to take his 
first degree of Bachelor of Arts, unless some other person being 
the son of some of the officiating ministers at some of the churches 
or chapels before-mentioned and otherwise qualified as aforesaid, 
and which qualification, had he been a Member of the said Col- 
lege at the time the party in possession of the Scholarship had 
been elected, would have been entitled to a preference, shall be 
admitted a member of the said College, in which case the Scholar 
who shall be then in possession shall only hold the same for that ^^ ^^^^ 
year, and the other with a prior right shall be elected to the peii^of 
same the year following. And I do appoint the Master and Itif^tl^'of 
senior Fellows of Saint John's College Trustees for the said Sf^f****^" 



Clive. 



276 

Scholarships; and as to the several Benefactions aboye-men- 
tioned, it is my will that the same person who shall have been 
elected to preach the Sermons shall not at any time afterwards 
Lecturer not bo olocted to discharge the duty of the Christian Advocate, nor 
chrktian the Christian Advocate that of the Lecturer, to the intent that the 
noiviceversa, Beuefactions may prove more extensive and be of general use and 
service, and that many and different persons may be engaged in 
a cause so truly glorious as to defend, to illustrate, and to confirm 
the sacred truths of Christianity; and as for and concerning all 
that my Messuage and Tenement with the Appurtenances situate 
Estate in lying aud being in Clive in the said County of Chester, together 
with the Lands thereto belonging, consisting of one hundred 
statute acres of ground and upwards, the tythes and tenths of 
Corn and Grain throughout the aforesaid Township of Clive, all 
now in lease to Thomas Andrews for the term of twenty-one 
years from Candlemas and May-day Old Style, one thousand seven 
hundred and seventy-one, and occupied or enjoyed by him, his 
undertenants or assigns; and all that my other Messuage and 
Tenement, with the Lands thereto belonging, situate, lying and 
being in Clive aforesaid, likewise in lease to the said Thomas 
Andrews, though the House is now in the occupation of Sarah 
Doncassen; and also all that my other Messuage and Tenement, 
with the Lands and Hereditaments thereto belonging, in Clive 
aforesaid, now in the holding or occupation of William Burgess, 
his undertenants or assigns; And also all those my three Closes, 
Fields or Parcels of Land in Clive aforesaid, commonly called or 
known by the names of the Wood-house-field, the Weever Bridge 
Banks, and Piggot^s Orchard, containing together eight statute 
acres and upwards, and now in the holding or occupation of 
John Meanly, his undertenants or assigns: And all and every 
other my Messuages, Tenements, Lands, Tythes and Heredita- 
ments whatsoever situate, lying, arising or being in Clive afore- 
said, I give and devise the whole of such Premises in Clive 
(subject to the conditional power of sale of part thereof herein- 
after contained) to the said Ralph Leeke, John Smith, and 
Thomas Yawdrey, their Executors, Administrators and Assigns, 
for the term of one hundred years, if my said sister Jane Jenkins, 
or the said Ralph Leeke shall so long live, or any of my said 
brothers or sisters or their assigns shall so long continue entitled 



277 

to the receipts of the rents and profits of the Premises in Newton 
and Middlewich, by Tirtue of the limitations or devises herein- 
before contained ; Upon the trusts and for the seyeral intents 
and purposes following: that is to say, upon trust that they the xmst 
said Ralph Leeke, John Smith, and Thomas Yawdrey, the sur- 
vivors or survivor of them, his Executors or Administrators, do and 
shall by and out of the rents and profits of the said Premises Annuities, 
comprised in the said term of one hundred years, in the first 
place, pay to my said sister Jane Jenkins or her assigns an£iotojane 
annuity or yearly sum of ten pounds during her natural life, by 
even half-yearly payments on every twenty-fifth day of March 
and twenty-ninth day of September, the same payments to com- 
mence from and be made on the same days as hereinbefore 
appointed for the commencement and payment of the annuities to 
my brothers, subject nevertheless to the like contingent postpone- 
ment; And also do and shall pay out of the same rents and ^se^toBaiph 
profits to the said Ralph Leeke, or that he in case he shall sur- 
vive his said co-trustees do and shall retain thereout for his own 
use, in consideration of the care and trouble which he may have 
in the faithful discharge of his trust, and from the esteem and 
affection I have for him, one annuity of twenty-eight pounds of 
lawful money of Great Britain during his natural life, to be paid 
or deducted half-yearly at Michaelmas and Lady-day, the first 
half-yearly payment to be made on such of those days as shall 
first happen after my decease; And from and after the death of 
the said Ralph Leeke, in case the said term of one hundred 
years shall not by such his death be determined, I direct that a Fourth scho> 
like annual sum of twenty-eight pounds shall commence and con- 
tinue payable by my said last-mentioned Trustees out of the 
rents and profits of the Premises comprised in the same term for 
a fourth Scholarship^ for the son of a clergyman in Saint John's 
College, Cambridge, to be qualified and chosen in the same 
manner as the other three Scholars are hereinbefore ordered and 
appointed, and to be subject to the like rules and regulations, 
until on the determination of the said one hundred years term 
the said fourth Scholar shall become entitled to one-sixth part of 
the rents and profits of the premises in Clive for his support 

> See this Clause as to the Foundation of this Scholarship (subsequently revoked) 
from Clive made whoUy void in page 303. 



278 
S?^*". w And wherea43 althousch I have iDcluded the before-mentianed 

Middlewicn ^ , 

House formerly knovrn by the sign of the "Black Lion," and novr 

in the holding or occupation of the said Richard Reeves, his 

undertenants or assigns, in the disposition of the premises in 

subject to a Ncwtou and Middle wich, yet as such disposition thereof is sub- 

powero ^' 'jQQ^ ijq ^i^q powcr of Sale if necessary for the payment of my 

debts hereinafter contained, therefore in case such sale shall take 
place, I direct that in lieu of the rent of that house the said 
Ralph Leeke, John Smith and Thomas Vawdrey, or the sur- 
vivors or survivor of them, his Executors or Administrators, do 
and shall under and by virtue of the said term of one hundred 
years, and by and out of the rents and profits of the premises 
therein comprised pay to such of my brother, or sister, who shall 
by virtue of this my Will successively become entitled to the 
receipt of the rents and profits of the premises in Newton and 
Middlewich, a clear annuity or yearly sum of eight pounds of 
lawful money of Great Britain during so long as such my brother 
or sister or their assigns shall remain or be entitled to such re- 
ceipt of rents and profits, such last-mentioned annuity to com- 
mence and be paid on the same days whereon the annuity of 
thirty pounds hereinbefore given to my eldest brother for the 
time being shall commence and be paid. And I do direct and 
declare that the said term of one hundred years is so vested in 
them the said Ralph Leeke, John Smith and Thomas Yawdrey, 
upon further trust, that they, or the survivors or survivor of 
them, or the Executors, Administrators, or Assigns of such sur- 
vivor, do and shall by and out of the rents and profits of the 

ciive. premises in Clive which shall arise previous to the determination 

of the said term of one hundred years, and no longer, annually 

£60Lectuier. pay the sum of sixty pounds (exclusive of such augmentation as 
hereinbefore and hereinafter is mentioned) on Saint John the 
Evangelist's Day following the preaching of the twenty lectures 

Lecturer. or scrmons herein after mentioned, to such learned and ingenious 
clergyman in the said University of Cambridge of the degree of 
Mast€|r of Arts, and under the age of forty years, as shall be 
duly chosen or elected at the time, and by the persons hereinafter 
mentioned and appointed for that purpose, as a salary for preach- 
ing the before- mentioned sermons or lectures on the days and 
upon the subjects hereinafter more particularly mentioned and 



279 

prescribed, on the determination of the said term of one hundred 
years. And also do and shall by and out of the same rents and 
profits of the premises in Clive which shall arise therefrom pre- 
vious to the determination of the said term' of one hundred 
years, and no longer, pay during the life of my said sister Jane 
Jenkins the annual sum of twenty pounds, and after her decease the 
annual sum of thirty pounds, to such other learned and ingenious 
person in the said University under the degree of Master of 
Arts, as shall compose for that year the best dissertation in the Diasertator. 
English language on the subjects hereinafter mentioned and 
prescribed for such dissertation, on the determination of the said 
term of one hundred years, and to be subject to the like rules 
and regulations. And upon further trust that they the said 
Ralph Leeke, John Smith and Thomas Yawdrey, or the sur- 
vivors or survivor of them, his Executors, Administrators, or 
Assigns, do and shall pay and apply the residue of the rents and Residue of 
profits of the premises in Ciive which shall arise previous to the t?i!^c!turer!^ 
determination of the said term of one hundred years, and no 
longer, and which are not herein (or by a grant or rent-charge 
of ten pounds per annum, dated the fourth day of November 
one thousand seven hundred and seventy three, by me made and 
enrolled in the High Court of Chancery for certain perpetual 
charitable uses in the aforesaid townships of Middlewich and 
Sandbach) otherwise disposed of, to and for the use of the person TotheLec- 
and persons who shall from time to time preach the before-men- 
tioned twenty lectures, in augmentation of the salary herehi 
before appointed for such Lecturer. And from and after the end 
or other determination of the said term of one hundred years, 
determinable as aforesaid, I give and devise all and every my 
said Messuages, Lands, Tythes, and Hereditaments in Clive afore- Estate in 
said to the said University of Cambridge for ever, for the pur- tnbrenit? 
poses hereinafter mentioned and contained, that is to say, I will 
and direct that the annual rents, tythes, and profits thereof shall 
be divided into six equal parts or shares and disposed of in to be divided 

into six parts* 

manner following. And first it was always my humble and 
earnest desire and intention that the following donation and de- 
vise should be founded as much as possible on the plan of that 
profoundly learned and successful inquirer into nature and most 
religious adorer of nature's God, I mean the truly great and 



280 

Mr Boyle, good (as wcIl as hoiiorable) Robert Boyle, Esquire, who has 
added so much lustre and done equal seryice both hj his learning 
and his life to his native country and to human nature and to the 
cause of Christianity and truth, to the promoting in some degree 
a design so worthy of every reasonable creature. I direct that four 

uiTLwoSen pa^'ts out of six of the last-mentioned rents, tythes, and profits to 
arise from the premises (exclusive of such augmentations as herein- 
before and hereinafter are mentioned) shall be paid on Saint John 
the Evangelist's day following the preaching of the lectures or 
sermons after mentioned annually to such learned and ingenious 
clergyman in the said University of the degree of Master of 
Arts, and under the age of forty years as shall be duly chosen 
or elected on Christmas Day, or within seven days after, by the 
Vice- Chancellor there for the time being, and by the Master or 
Head of Trinity College and the Master of Saint John's College, 

i^rer-hi» or by any two of them, in order to preach twenty sermons in 
the whole year, that is to say, ten sermons in the following 
spring in Saint Mary's Great Church in Cambridge, namely, 
one sermon either on the Friday morning or else on Sunday 
afternoon in every week during the months of April and May 
and the two first weeks of June, and likewise ten sermons in the 
same church in the following Autumn, either on the Fi4day 
morning or else on Sunday afternoon in every week during the 
months of September and October and during the two first weeks 
in November, the subject of which discourses shall be as folio weth, 
that is to say, the subject of five sermons in the Spring and like- 
wise of five sermons in the Autumn shall be to shew the evidence 
for Revealed Religion, and to demonstrate in the most convincing 
and persuasive manner the Truth and Excellence of Christianity, 
80 as to include not only the prophecies and miracles, general 
and particular, but also any other proper and useful arguments, 
whether the same be direct or collateral proofs of the Christian 
religion, which he may think fittest to discourse upon, either in 
general or particular, especially the collateral arguments, or else 
any particular article or branch thereof, and chiefly against 
notorious infidels, whether atheists or deists, not descending to 
any particular sects or controversies (so much to be lamented) 
amongst Christians themselves, except some new or dangerous 
error either of superstition or enthusiasm, as of Popery or 



1 



281 

Methodism or the like^ either in opiDion or practice shall pre* 
Tail, in which case only it may be necessary for that time to 
write and preach against the same. Nevertheless the preacher 
of the ten sermons last mentioned to shew the Truth and Ex- 
cellence of Revealed Religion and the Evidence of Christianity 
may at his own discretion preach either more or fewer than ten 
sermons on this great argument only^ provided he shaU in con- 
sequence thereof lessen or increase the number of the other ten 
remaining sermons which are hereinafter directed to be on the 
more obscure parts of Holy Scripture in a due proportion^ 
so as that he shall every year preach twenty s^mons oa these 
subjects in the whole. And as to the ten sermons that remain, 
of which five are to be preached in the Spring and five in the 
Autumn as before mentioned, the lecturer or preacher shall take 
for his subject some of the more difficult texts or obscure pa^ts 
of the Holy Scriptures, such I mean as may appear to be more 
generally useful or necessary to be explained, and which may 
best admit of such a comment or explanation without presuming 
to pry too far into the profound secrets or awful mysteries of 
the Almighty. And in aQ the said twenty sermons such prac* 
tical observations shall be made and such useful conclusions added 
as may best instruct and edify mankind, the said twenty sermons sermons to 
to be every year printed and a new preacher to be every year Not to be 
elected (except in the .case of the extraordinary merit of the^!^pt"&'e.; 
preacher) when it may sometimes be thought proper to continue 
the same person for five, at the most for six years together, but 
no longer term, nor shall he ever afterwards be again elected to nor again 
the same duty. And I do <]irect that the expence of printing ^ 
the said sermons shall be defrayed out of the said temporary 
stipend or salary of sixty pounds with the augmentations first 
mentioned, or from the further provision hereby made of the 
rents, tythes, and profits afterwards mentioned for the said Lec- 
turer, and the remainder of the same given to him. I do also 
direct that one other such sixth part or share of the rents and one sixth 
profits to arise from the premises at Clive shall go and be paid totheois. . 
(exclusive of the augmentation before mentioned from Middle- 
wich and Newton) to such other learned and ingenious person in nissertator- 
the said University under the degree of Master of Arts« as 
shall compose for that year the best dissertation in the English 

VOL. III. 8 



282 

language on the eyidence in general or on the prophecies or mira- 
cles in particular, or any other particular argument, whether the 
same be direct or collateral proofs of the Christian Religion, in 
order to eyince its truth and excellence, the subject of which 
dissertation shall be given out by the Yice-Chancellor and the 
said two Masters my trustees above mentioned, or by some of 
them, on New Year's Day annually, and such dissertation as 
shall be by them or any two of them on Christmas Day annually 
the best approved, to be also printed and the expence defrayed 
out of the author's income under this my Will, and the remainder 
given to him en Saint John the Evangelist's Day following; and 
he who shall be so rewarded shall not be admitted at any future 
time as a candidate again in the same way, though he may be 
elected to the other offices afterwards, to the intent that others 
may be invited and encouraged to write on so sacred and sublime 

Pojffth scho- a subject. (And as to the remsdning such sixth part or share of 
the rents and profits to arise from the premises in Clive, I direct 
that the same shall annually go and be paid towards the main- 
tenance and support of the fourth Scholarship^ hereinbefore 
directed to be founded on the death of the said Ralph Leeke, if 
such foundation shall then have taken place, and if not, then that 
the same sixth part or share of the clear rents and profits of the 
premises in Clive shall go to found and from that time support 
and maintain such fourth Scholarship, the same to be subject to 
and governed by the same rules and regulations as hereinbefore 
are mentioned and prescribed with respect to the three Scholar^ 
ships to be founded from the premises in Sandbach and Brad wall.) 

Deficiency of But if at any time, either from a temporary decrease of the 
value of land, or from any contingent event herein mentioned, 
or from any other cause whatsoever, there shall be a deficiency 
in the rents of the said estates in Clive or Newton and Middle- 
wich, or of Sandbach and Bradwall, or any of them, to answer 
the respective annual charges thereon, all and every person and 
persons claiming any interest, share, or annuity in possession in 

Abfttttncnt. the samo estates respectively shall abate in proportion to such 
his interest, share or annuity, so that the deficiencies of one year 
shall not be carried into or made good out of the rents of the 

1 See this clause as to the foundation of this Scholarship from Clive, made whoUy 
void in page 303. 



283 

next. And I do request and appoint that the Vice-Chancellor vioe^^han. 
and the said tffo Masters of Trinity and Saint John's CoUesres SasteS^of 

1 11 11 r^i • -TV . , . ® Trinity and 

shall meet annually on Christmas Day or within seven days after ^^^^^^ 
in the public-hall of Trinity College, or at the room of the said ^^^ 
Vice-Chancellor, or of some one of the said trustees at their re- 
spective Colleges, in order to make such elections as herein 
before specified of the Lecturer for the annual sermons and the 
Christian Advocate, and at the same time if they shall think 
proper, or else on New-Tear's Day, to give out the subject of <niNew 
the dissertations; and if any of the trustees shall then be absent mease of 
then I request that such trustee shall give his opinion and con- * °**' 
currence in writing under his hand. And in case either by rea- 
son of the disagreement in judgment or otherwise of the said ordisagree- 
Vice-Chancellor and Master, or of the Greek Professor herein- 
after named, they shall fail to make such election at the time 
and place aforesaid, or in case they or the Senior Fellows of 
Saint John's College shall make default in the execution of any 
of the ppwers or trusts hereinbefore vested in them or any of 
them, my will is, that on every such default the power of elec- 
tion, nomination, or performing any other matter which ought 
to have been done as aforesaid, shall for that time only vest in 
the Right Reverend the Bishop of Ely for the time being, whom Bighopof 
I hereby humbly appoint as visitor or inspector to see that the viaitor. 
benefactions and endowments in this my Will in favour of the 
said University be all of them applied to the uses hereby in- 
tended in a just and proper manner, and in case of any perver- 
sion or misapplication of all or any of them, to rectify the same ms power. 
in a summary way with reason and equity, and thereupon in a 
convenient time afterwards the said Bishop shall proceed to 
elect or nominate or do such other act which ought to have been 
done or performed by the said Yice-Chancellor and Masters, 
Greek Professor, and Fellows of Saint John's College, or some 
of them as aforesaid. And my will is that the visitorial power 
hereby vested in the said Bishop of Ely shall be conclusive to 
the parties in the premises, and that his sentence and acts therein 
shall not be appealable in any Court whatsoever or before any 
person whatsoever, it being my desire to prevent as much as 
possible the flames of dissension in a Society from whence these 
institutions are meant ultimately to promote universal love and 
peace amongst mankind. 8 — 2 



284 

onek Pro- And in respect to the Greek Professor of the said University 

it is my desire that whensoever the Head or Master of Trinity 
College, or the Master of Saint John's College, shall happen to be 
Vice-Chancellor, or in case of a vacancy in any of the said three 
places by death or otherwise, the said Greek Professor shall 
during such Vice-Chancellorship or vacancy, act in and with all 
the powers hereby given to the Vice-Chancellor and Masters or 
any two of them, and shall have the same vote and power as 
any of them, as virtually and effectually as if this provisional 
clause had been repeatedly inserted in the several appointments 
aforesaid ; and as a further guard and to prevent any perversion 
or misapplication of any of the benefactions above mentioned, it 
is my mind and will that if either the Lecturer or Preacher of 
the twenty sermons, or the Christian Advocate shall neglect or 
not discharge their office as herein and as in duty and conscience 
they ought to do in such case, such person or persons guilty of 
such fault or neglect, shall for that year or during such neglect 
only forfeit or lose his or their several salaries, and sugh sum or 
sums and benefactions as should otherwise have been paid or 
given as due to them, shall then become due and be paid by 

Six Senior equsl sharcs to the six Senior Fellows of Saint John's College. 

ISmJoh^'i. And further it is my will, that all the clauses relating to the 
aforesaid Endowments, whether in regard to the annual sermons 
by the Lecturer, or to the dissertation or to the defence of Chris- 

Endowinenu tiauity by the Christian Advocate, expressing also the particular 

in maimer 8ums or stipcuds anuoxed to ea;ch office, with the further provision 
by donation of shares of the rents and profits of the premises or 
otherwise, shall every year be printed at large in the beginning 
of each particular work or treatise, that is, such clauses only as 
relate or belong to each particular treatise or office, by way of 
preface or introduction to such respective publications herein* 
before directed to he made, and that the clauses so to be printed 
shall be introduced with the following words: " Clauses from the 
Will of the Reverend John Hulse, late of Elworth, in the County 
of Chester, clerk, deceased, dated the twenty-first day of July, 
in the year of our Lord one thousand and seven hundred and 
seventy-seven, expressed in the words of the Testator, as he, 
in order to prevent mistakes, thought proper to draw and write 
the same himself, and directed that such clauses should be every 



285 

year printed, to the intent that the several persons whom it 
might concern and be of service, might know that there were 
such special donations or endowments left for the encouragement 
of piety and learning in an age so unfortunately addicted to 
infidelity and luxury, and that others might be invited to the 
like charitable and, as he humbly hoped, seasonable and useful 
benefactions." And then each of the said clauses shall be copied 
verbatim (except where the insertion of a few words may serve 
and be requisite to explain such clauses) from this my Will, for 
instance, in regard to the particular clauses relating to the pro- 
vision for the Lecturer or Preacher of the annual sermons, of 
which clauses there are four, the first of them shall begin with 
the words, " And from and after the end, expiration or other 
determination of the said term of ninety-mine years, determinable 
as aforesaid," and conclude with the words, ''twenty sermons 
agreeably to this my Will." The second such clause relating to the 
Lecturer, shall begin with the words, "And I do direct and de- 
clare that the said term of one hundred years is so vested in 
them, the said Ralph Leeke, John Smith and Thomas Yawdrey, 
upon further trust," and end with the words " prescribed on the 
determination of the said term of one hundred years." The third 
such clause relating to the said Lecturer, shall begin with the 
words, **And upon further trust that," and conclude with the words 
"in augmentation of the salary hereinbefore appointed for such 
Lecturer." And the fourth such clause relating to the said Lecturer 
shall begin with the words, *' And from and after the end or other 
sooner determination of the said term of one hundred years, 
determinable as aforesaid ; I give," and conclude with the words 
" for the said Lecturer, and the remainder of the same given to 
him," and so respectively with regard to the clauses relating to 
the provision for the author of the best dissertation and the 
Christian Advocate, care being taken throughout all such clauses 
not to introduce the same abruptly ; and I desire that immedi- 
ately following the last of such clauses, so to be printed by way 
of preface in each particular work, shall be added the invocation 
contained immediately previous to the conclusion of this my 
Will, beginning with the words, *'And may the Divine blessing 
for ever go along with all my benefactions," and concluding with 
the words, " To the good of my fellow-creatures," as a proper 



286 
Abstxaetof coDcIusion for such clauses. And further my will is, that after 

the endow- •, , i*i ^ • 3 • 

S^oMif* ^^® conclusion of the clauses which are to be printed as an intro- 
to be printed. jmj^jQjj ^^ ^.jj^ auuual sormons shall likewise be added a short 
abstract of the heads or material parts of this my Will, which 
relate to, and are for the benefit of the said four Scholarships, 
but in a very concise or summary way, yet expressing the par- 
ticular amount of the annual stipends annexed to such Scholar- 
ships, with the devise of a moiety afterwards of the Premises in 
Sandbach and Brad wall for the benefit of three such scholars; as 
likewise the devise of a stipend from the Premises in Clive, and 
the sixth part of the rents and profits of the Premises in Newton 
and Middlewich and Clive, for the fourth such Scholarship, so 
that such Clergyman or persons whom the same may concern, 
may know that there aiFe such endowments of which they may 
claim and take the benefit under the regulations, and with the 
The Will to qualifications therein mentioned. And I do hereby appoint and 
^'°'' most earnestly request and trust, that this my Will shall be 
proved and registered in the proper court as soon as conveni- 
ently may be done, or within four months at farthest after my 
Eariiwt^o- decoaso, so as to give the most early notice to the University, 
^S?^t?.^ that proper and sufficient time may be allowed for the composing 
and preaching the sermons, and for the other performances, so 
as that the same may be completed within the time required by 
this my Will. And if at the time of my decease the year shall be 
so far advanced, that all the sermons cannot be preached at the 
proper time, nor the other duties and offices performed, to which the 
salaries are annexed, within the compass of that year, such salaries 
shall all sink into the rent for that year, and be disposed of as 
the rest of my personal Estate. And that a true and attested copy 
of the whole of my Will, and also another copy by way of ab- 
stract, but in the very words of the Will itself, of every clause 
that relates to my several benefactions to the University of 
Cambridge, and of this clause in particular, and with an exact 
account of the Estates, and the tenants and the rents that the 
Estates shall be then set for, together with the names, and as far 
as may be the ages of the several persons who may have any 
claim or title by this my Will to any annuity, or to the pos- 
session for life of any of my said Estates that are as above 
devised to such uses, shall be transmitted as soon as may be after 



287 

my decease, or after such probate, to the Vice-Chancellor of 
Cambridge, and the two Masters of the Colleges above-mentioned, 
in order that the same may be duly registered or enrolled, and 
that proper notice of the same may be taken annually, and 
public mention made thereof regularly every year, as is usual ^ Seoom°™ 
in commemoration thereof, amongst the other benefactions or m«n»or»ted. 
endowments that have heretofore been given to that illustrious 
University. It is my mind and will that all my personal Estate, 
except only such particular articles as may by me be herein- 
after or by a note under my own hand excepted, together with 
the residue of the rents and profits of my said Estates (if any Penooai 
there is) not herein before disposed of, shall, as far as the same 
will extend, go towards payment of my debts, legacies and nebt^Lega- 
funeral expences, and if after such application thereof there shall 
still be a deficiency, and such deficiency shall not exceed the sum 
of four hundred pounds, I direct that the same shall be made JlSSSi^ **' 
good, and discharged out of the first rents which can arise from ^^^* 
my said several Estates in the townships of Newton, Middlewich, uSS^^^ 
Sandbach, Bradwall and Clive, nor in that case shall any of the 
annual sums or other interests hereinbefore disposed of, commence 
or be payable before such deficiency shall be made up, except 
the respective annuities hereinbefore given to my said Trustees 
and Executors, Ralph Leeke, John Smith and Thomas Vawdrey, 
which at all events shall commence and be payable at the days 
and times hereinbefore appointed for that purpose; but if it shall Deficiency 
happen that such deficiency shall exceed the sum of four hun- £400. 
dred pounds, in that case I direct that such deficiency shall be 
made good by the sale of the following House or Tenement in 
Middlewich, and by the sale of all or part of the other Lands 
or Tenements which (if such sale shall likewise prove necessary 
and not otherwise) I now appoint for that purpose, that is to Estates may 
say. All that my Messuage or Dwelling-house, and Tenement oase of &c. 
with the Garden, Outbuildings and Appurtenances thereto be- 
longing, situate and being in Middlewich aforesaid, in a certain 
street there, called Wheelock Street, now in the holding or oc- 
cupation of Richard Reeves, and known lately by the sign of 
the "Black Lion;" And all that my Messuage and Tenement 
with the Land and Hereditaments, containing about one statute 
acre and a half, thereto belonging, situate, lying and being in 
Clive aforesaid, and in the holding or occupation of the said 



288 

William Burgess, his undertenants and assigns, and all those 
Fields, Closes, or Parcels of Land in Clive aforesaid, commonly 
called the Weever Bridge Banks, and Piggott's Orchard, con- 
taining in the whole two statute acres and upwards, and now in 
the holding or occupation of the said John Manly, his under- 
tenants or assigns; and I do empower and direct the sidd Ralph 
Leeke, John Smith and Thomas Vawdrey, or the surrivors or 
survivor of them or the heirs of such survivor, to sell and alien 
the same, and the fee simple and inheritance thereof, either 
together or in parcels, for the best price or most money that can 
be reasonably gotten for the same, discharged of all incum- 
brances and tythes whatsoever (except the tithes of the Lands 
in Clive which I direct shall in no wise be sold); but I do request 
that they will not sell any more than they on mature delibe- 
ration shall adjudge absolutely necessary for supplying the 
aforesaid deficiency, and that in such sales they will observe the 
following order, that is, to sell the "Black Lion" first, Burgess's 
Tenement the next, and last of all the said Fields, called Weever 
Bridge Banks, and Piggotfs Orchard; and I do hereby appoint 
and direct that the receipt of them, the said Ralph Leeke, 
John Smith and Thomas Vawdrey, or the survivors or survivor 
of them or of his heirs under his or their hands, shall be a 
sufficient discharge and discharges to such purchaser or pur- 
chasers for his or their purchase-money bona fide paid, and the 
Premises so purchased shall thenceforth remain and enure to 
and to the use of such purchaser and purchasers and his and 
their heirs ; and I do further direct that the said Ralph Leeke, 
John Smith and Thomas Vawdrey, and the survivors and sur- 
vivor of them and his heirs shall within three months next after 
the completing such purchase or purchases, render a true account 
in writing to the said Vice-Chancellor and Masters or some of 
them, of such purchase-money and the application thereof, with 
Trustees to be pi^op^i* vouchcrs to authenticate the same. I appoint the said 
"^^^"^ Ralph Leeke, John Smith and Thomas Vawdrey, and the sur- 
vivors or survivor of them, receiver or receivers of the rents and 
profits of my said Estates in Sandbach, Bradwall and Clive, and 
commit to them the care and management of the same, and in 
In case of caso of the death of any of them, I appoint the survivors and 
survivor of them, and Mr Joseph Skerrat of Sandbach, attorney, 
and the survivors and survivor of them, receivers and receiver 



289 

of the rents and profits of the same Premises ; and I do appoint 
that the said Joseph Skerrat shall have an allowance of eight Mr. jo8.sker- 
pounds per annum from the rents of the premises in Sandbach ^^ 
and Bradwall, during his natural life, in consideration of such 
his trust, payable half-yearly on every twenty-fifth day of March 
and twenty-ninth day of September, the first of those payments 
to be made on such of those days as shall first happen after the 
commencement of his office for his trouble therein; and if on the 
death of any one of my said Trustees, Ralph Leeke, John Smith 
and Thomas Yawdrey, it shall happen that the said Joseph 
Skerrat shall likewise then be dead, in that case I appoint the 
Reverend Thomas Hedges of Church Hulme, clerk, with the then Bevd. ihot. 

. . • Hodges, 

surviving Trustees and the survivors and survivor of them, receiv- 
ers and receiver of such last-mentioned rents and profits of the 
Premises in Sandbach, Bradwall and Clive, and managers thereof^ 
and on the death of two of my said Trustees, Ralph Leeke, 
John Smith and Thomas Yawdrey (the said Joseph Skerrat 
being then also dead), or in case the said Thomas Hodges shall 
refuse to act as receiver under my foregoing appointment, then 
I appoint the Reverend Thomas Burrows of Goostrey in the Bevd. Thos. 
said county of Chester, clerk, and my then surviving Trustee ^""^'^ 
or Trustees and the survivors or survivor of them, receivers and 
receiver of the same rents and profits and managers of the 
Premises from which such rents and profits shall arise ; and my 
Will is that the said Thomas Hodges and Thomas Burrows shall 
each of them during such their respective receiverships, receive 
an annuity of eight pounds per annum, such annuities to bewithuke 
issuing and payable out of the rents and profits of the Premises 
in Sandbach and Bradwall, comprised in the said term of two 
hundred years, and to be paid (as well as the said annuity to 
the said Joseph Skerrat) by the person or persons in whom that 
term shall from time to time be vested by equal half-yearly 
payments on the twenty-fifth day of March and twenty-ninth 
day of September, the first of those payments to be made on 
such of those days as shall first happen after they the said 
Thomas Hodges and Thomas Burrows shall respectively enter 
on the execution of their office ; and from and after such time 
as the Premises in Middlewich and Newton shall vest in the 
said University in possession^ I direct that the said receivership 



290 

Bhall cease, provided the said Ralph Leeke, John Smith, Thomas 
Yawdrey, Joseph Skerrat, Thomas Hodges and Thomas Bur- 
rows be all of them then dead, or do not accept the office; 
otherwise at the decease of the survivor of them, and after th& 
decease of such survivor, I do recommend the said Vice-Chan- 
Thevkarof cellor and Masters to appoint from time to time the Vicar 
reoommlend. of Mlddlowich for the time being^, or the Vicar of Sandbach 

m1 tn h p Ttn ^ 

ceiver. for the time being, if resident in their respectives cures, to supply 
the place of such receiver, and also of the Premises in Middlewich 
and Newton, when they shall vest in the said University in 
With Salary posscssion, and to allow such Vicar -five pounds per annum 
ciife,and£5 out of the routs of Glivo, and five pounds per annum out of the 
^md^' rents of Sandbach and Bradwall in respect of the trouble ; but if 
neither of such resident Vicars will accept the office, or if the 
said Vice-Chancellor and Masters or any two of them shall not 
think proper to appoint such Vicars thereto, the said Vice-Chan- 
cellor and Masters or some two of them are to appoint some other 
proper person with the like allowance or any other sum which 
shall appear to them proper. 
Beceiverto And I do cxprossly direct that the said successive receivers 

counts befOTo shall beforc Christmas in each year transmit to the Vice-Chan- 
each year cellor a just and true account of the rents of the preceding year, 
that is of the rents which shall have been due at the Lady-day 
preceding, and of his the said receiver's receipts and payments in 
under rospect of that year, under the penalty of forfeiting for every such 
default one-half of such receiver's salary, which moiety so for- 
feited shall sink into the rents of the respective Estates charge- 
able therewith. And I do empower the said Ralph Leeke, John 
Smith, Thomas Vawdrey, Joseph Skerrat, Thomas Hodges and 
Thomas Burrows from time to time during their respective 
receiverships, and after the determination thereof, the said Vice- 
pow^ofiet- Chancellor and Masters or any two of them, to set, let and 

tingEstatei , .... 

demise any part of the Premises committed to their respective 
management for any term or number of years not exceeding 
twenty-one years for the best and most improved rent that can 
be reasonably had, and not to take any fine whatsoever on any 
account for the same, such rent to go according to the limitation 
in this my Will; and also to enter into contracts and articles 
as Lessors with the respective Tenants as they shall adjudge 



291 

most advantageous or proper for the management of the said 
Estates^ which I do direct shall be binding to all claiming under 
this my Will, But I do restrain the said receivers, Vice-Chan- 
cellor and Masters and every of them, from granting any Licases 
other than in manner aforesaid, and enjoin the execution of coun- 
terparts of the Leases hereby warranted: and I do direct that 
such Leases shall respectively contain in them Covenants from the covenant for 
Lessees that they, under a sufficient penalty yearly and every *"** 
year at their own expence, plant and preserve from destruction 
(if the Lands so to be leased shall be in Sandbach and Bradwall) 
after the proportion of twenty oak-plants, fifteen ash-plants and 
fifteen sets of poplar for the whole of my said Estates in Sand- 
bach and Bradwall ; and if such Lands so to be leased happen to 
lib in Clive aforesaid, then after the proportion to each Lessee 
of fifteen oak-plants, fifteen ash-plants and fifteen sets of poplar 
for the whole of my said Estate in Clive. And I further empower 
the said Ralph Leeke, John Smith, Thomas Yawdrey, Joseph 
Skerrat, Thomas Hodges and Thomas Burrows from time to 
time during their respective receiverships, and after the deter- 
mination thereof the said Yice-Chancellor and Masters or any 
two of them, to set, let or demise all or any of my said Houses HouMsin 
or Cottages in Newton and Middlewich aforesaid or in either of Mtddiewich 
them for three lives, or for three lives and twenty-one years to g^2^ 
commence from the death of the survivor of such three lives, to 
any person or persons who will be tied, if there shall be a just 
occasion for such building, to build a new House or Houses at 
then* own expence in the room of those which shall be so demised, 
so as upon every such Lease or Leases a proper rent, or at least 
the accustomed rent shall be reserved, always making a just 
allowance for such their expence, which rents as well as the fines 
to be received for the granting of such Leases I do direct shall 
go and be applied to such and the same uses as the Houses so to 
be leased shall then stand Umited to by this my WiU. And I do 
also empower my same last-mentioned Trustees during their 
respective receiverships, and afterwards the said Vice-Chancellor 
and Masters or any two of them, to take and allow timber and nmberand 
wood in the rough from any part of my said Estates or any of 2d for 
them where it can most conveniently be spared for the necessary 
repairs, building or re-building of any part or all of the said 



292 

Premises, so as a sufficient stock of timber be constantly left and 

preserved on my said Estates for the future repairs, buildings or 

Timber may ro-buildings thoroof. And if it shall at any time come to pass 

the^oney that the timber on my said Estates shall increase so much as ta 

purchase, bo Considerably more than will be required for such buildings 

and repairs as above-mentioned, then I do empower my same 

last-mentioned Trustees during their respective receiverships, and 

afterwards the said Vice- Chancellor or Masters or any two of 

them, to sell so much of the said timber as shall be more than 

necessary for such buildings and repairs for the most money that 

can reasonably be gotten for the same. And I do direct that 

the money to be raised by the sale of such timber shall by my 

same Trustees, if during their receiverships, but if afterwards 

then by the said Yice-Chancellor and Masters or any two of them, 

be laid out in the purchase of Lands and Hereditaments in the 

said County of Chester or in any neighbouring county, and such 

Lands and Hereditaments immediately on the purchase thereof 

shall be duly settled, so that the rents and profits thereof shall 

go to the use and benefit of the Lecturer and of the Christian 

Advocate to augment their several salaries, and shall every year 

Exchange bo equally divided betwixt them. Provided always that if it 

of Houses, shall at any time hereafter happen that the owner or owners for 

&C. in CUve. "^ i 

the time being of the Field next to the said Thomas Andrews's 
Dwelling-house and Orchard in Clive aforesaid, and of the little 
Close or Field adjoining to that Field both at this time the inhe- 
ritance of George Wilbraham, Esquire, shall be inclined to make 
an exchange of those two Fields for any equivalent part of my 
said Lands in Clive, or in case of any other Fields in Clive which 
it may be a mutual advantage to both parties to have exchanged 
for such equivalent Lands in Clive, then and in such cases I do 
authorize and empower the said receivers during their respective 
receiverships, and afterwards the Vice-Chancellor and two Masters 
of Saint John^s and Trinity Colleges for the time being, to make 
such exchanges: And I do direct that such of my Lands which 
shall be so given in exchange shall be and remain unto and to 
the use and behoof of the person or persons who shall receive 
them in exchange, their heirs and assigns for ever, freed and dis- 
charged from all and every the devises thereof hereinbefore con- 
tsdned: and the said two Fields or any other Fields in Clive so 



293 

to be had in exchange for their mntual convenience by the said 
receivers or the said Vice- Chancellor and Masters, shall by them 
immediately after such exchange shall be completed be settled to 
such and the same uses as the residue of the said Premises in 
Clive shall then stand limited by virtue of this my Will. And Power to 
if it shall happen that the Freeholders in any of the Townships ScSSire? 
wherein my said Estates lie shall be desirous to enclose by con- 
sent any of the Commoning belonging to such Township, I do 
empower the said receivers during their respective receiverships, 
and afterwards the Vice-Chancellor and Masters of Saint John's 
and Trinity Colleges for the time being, to consent to such enclo- 
sures. And I do direct that their consent shall be binding to all 
and every person and persons who shall successively become 
entitled to such my Estates by virtue of this my Will, provided 
no fine be taken for such consent, and that a proportionate part 
of such enclosed Commons be allotted to go along with and make 
a part of the respective Estates to which it was before appurte- 
nant. And in case of any extraordinary damage happening to 
the Buildings of either of my said Estates, whether of Clive or 
of Sandbach with Bradwall or to any of my Houses in Newton 
or to the Public House in Middle wich, in which Charles Sherrat 
lately dwelled, by fire, tempest or otherwise, I empower the said in case of 
Ralph Leeke, John Smith, Thomas Vawdrey, Joseph Skerrat, "^' 
Thomas Hodges and Thomas Burrows during their respective 
receiverships, and afterwards the Vice-Chancellor and Masters 
or any- two of them, to borrow such sum of money as shall be 
sufficient to make good such extraordinary damage, or if the same 
be thought proper to re-build any of the said Houses either in 
the whole or in part only, either in the Townships of Clive or of 
Newton or Middlewich or of Sandbach and Bradwall, and by any 
deed or appointment by way of mortgage to make such sum, 
together with interest for the same, a subsisting charge on such 
Estate where such extraordinary damage shall happen. And my 
mind and will is that one-fourth part of the rents of all my 
Lands or Estates shall be appropriated and shall go every year 
towards the payment of such debts last-mentioned until the whole 
shall be paid off and discharged. And further it is my will that Deeds, &c. to 
during the respective receiverships of the said Ralph Leeke, ^?veS^*or 
John Smith, Thomas Vawdrey, Joseph Skerrat, Thomas Hodges **. 



294 

and Thomas Burrows, all mj deeds, evidences and writings shall 
be in the custody of the same receivers, or else be transmitted b j 
them to Cambridge to the principal Trustees there. And I do 
appoint that as well the said Balph Leeke, John Smith, Thomas 
Vawdrey, Joseph Skerrat, Thomas Hodges and Thomas Burrows, 
as the said successive receivers hereafter to be appointed, shall 
be allowed all reasonable expences relating to such their receiver- 
ship over and above the allowances aforesaid. And further, that 
they the said Ralph Leeke, John Smith and Thomas Yawdrey, 
their heirs, executors and administrators, shall retain out of the 
Costs and mouoy which shall come to their hands all such costs, charges and 
Charges. expcnccs as they or any of them shall sustain or be put unto in 
Indemnity, the exocution of the trusts hereby reposed in them. And I do 
direct that they shall not be answerable for any more monies 
than what shall actually come to their hands, nor for any loss 
which may happen to the said monies so as the same happen 
without their wilful default, nor the one of them for the other of 
them, or for the acts, deeds or disbursements the one of the other, 
but each of them for his own acts, deeds, receipts and disburse- 
Biworthto ments only. Provided always, and I do give and devise to the 
dreyfol life' Said Thomas Vawdrey during his life only, notwithstanding any 
of the devises hereinbefore contained, my capital Messuage of 
Elworth which I now inhabit, with the Gardens and Fold and 
such of the Outbuildings as are in my own occupation, he the 
said Thomas Vawdrey keeping the same premises in reasonable 
from Taxes, repair : And during such Life Estate to the said Thomas Vawdrey, 
^k^^,Si I do exempt those particular Premises from any taxes or duties 
P.M. ' whatsoever, be the same parliamentary or otherwise (except the 
window-tax), and from all charges and incumbrances created by 
this my Will, and direct that such taxes or duties and all such 
charges and incumbrances from which I do exempt them shall be 
borne by the rest of my Lands in Sand bach and Brad wall afore- 
said, and, subject to the devise contained in the last proviso, I do 
direct that the said House, Outbuildings, Gardens and Fold, shall 
go and be enjoyed in the manner prescribed in the preceding 
Inventory of part of this my Will. And as to the disposition of my personal 
Estate, it is my mind and will that an inventory shall be made 
of all my Goods and a Catalogue taken of all my Books as soon 
sennoni. as Conveniently may be after my decease ; And as to my sermons 



295 

that are in manuscript, they were chiefly intended for a plain 
congregation in the country and a small curacy which I held 
there, in which it was my lot to preach and spend many years of 
a life, which as I think that no man did ever envy, so I bless 
God that no man could ever reproach: it is therefore my desire 
and will that none of them shall be at all copied by any person, 
or lent to any one whatsoever, but that the same shall be wholly 
committed to the flames within one month after my decease, 
unless I shall leave particular directions under my hand to the 
contrary. And as for and concerning my Books and all my Books and 
other Goods, Chattels and personal Estate, in which I do include sold. 
a proportional part of the rent which shall be due from any of 
my Estates from the last rent-stage or rent-day to the time of 
my death in such manner as if I had been only tenant for life 
of the Premises, I do direct that the same shall be sold, dis- 
posed of and converted into ready money, and be a fund (in con- 
junction with that hereinbefore mentioned) for the payment of my 
debts, legacies and funeral expences and charges thereto incident. 
And out of such fund I give the several legacies following, that 
is to say, I bequeath the sum of forty pounds to be laid out in pious Books, 
the purchase of pious and good books to be given away after 
Evening Service on the several Sundays, either from the first 
Sunday after Easter unto Whitsunday, or from the first Sunday 
in Advent until Christmas-day (as the same may happen after my 
decease) to such poorer inhabitants as are able to read themselves 
or that have children that want to be instructed in their duty in 
the several Townships after mentioned, in the proportions and 
manner following, that is to say, twelve pounds in the two Town- 
ships of Middlewich and Clive, twelve pounds in Northwich and 
Witton Townships, and ten pounds in the Townships of Sandbach 
and Brad wall; and as to the remaining six pounds I direct that 
three pounds thereof shall be given to the inhabitants of the 
Chapelry of Church Hulme in the chancel there, and the other 
three pounds to the inhabitants of the Chapelry of Goostrey and 
in the chancel there. All which said sums after being laid out in 
the good books following are to be disposed of at the times and in 
the proportions aforesaid at the discretion of the respective residing 
or officiating minister and churchwardens or overseers of the poor 
of the said townships with the consent of my executors. And I 



296 

do direct that twenty shillings out of each of the said sums of 
twelve pounds, ten pounds, and three pounds, shall be laid out in 
Watts's Divine Songs for Children, and the remaining sums of 
two pounds in Church Hulme and Goostrey, as well as also three 
pounds more out of each of the said sums of twelve pounds to 
be in each of those respective places, to which the said sums are 
bequeathed, laid out and expended in explanations of the Church 
Catechism, the Husbandman's Manual, and the Preface to the 
old Whole Duty of Man, on the Necessity of Caring for the Soul, 
or in any other small books which may answer the same divine 
purpose. And whatever books of these kinds I may have by 
me at my death, I direct shall be given in manner aforesaid 
in the townships of Sandbach and Bradwall. And in the disposal 
of the aforesaid smaller books, such children as have duly said 
their Catechism in the Church should have the preference. And 
the two sums of eight pounds which remain from each twelve 
pounds and the nine pounds that remain from the ten pounds 
given to Sandbach and Bradwall, I further direct shall be laid 
out in larger books proper for persons that are more advanced 
in years and discretion, such as the old or new Whole Duty of 
Man, the Practice of Piety, the Husbandman's Spiritual Com- 
panion, Husbandry Spiritualized, by Flavell, otherwise called the 
Heavenly Use of Earthly Things, Archbishop Wake's Commentary 
on the Church Catechism, Watts on the Love of God, Sherlock 
upon Death, and particularly Doddridge's Discourses in Ten 
Sermons on Regeneration, since they are on a subject that is 
much degraded and discredited by the folly or madness of the 
Methodist and other enthusiasts; and I could earnestly wish to 
have the following three books on so important a subject as the 
blessed Sacrament bound up and given together, that is to say, 
Archbishop Synge's Answer to the Excuses or Pretences for not 
coming to the Holy Sacrament, Bishop Fleetwood's Reasonable 
Communicant, and the Companion to the Altar, as also the 
Christian Institutes, or the Whole Faith and Duty of a Christian, 
from the Holy Scriptures, by Bishop Gastrell, and likewise the 
Christian's Instructor, or Pocket Companion, extracted likewise 
from the Holy Scriptures, and recommended by Bishop Sherlock, 
the late learned Bishop of London, all which are judiciously 
fitted for common use. There is likewise (God be praised) a great 



297 

variety of other good books that may be had if all the foregoing 
cannot, but the above I would particularly recommend, and would 
have all of them of the smaller editions if they shall appear to 
be of a clear letter and legible print. And I do likewise hereby 
appoint and direct that a copy of the clauses of this my Will so 
far as relates to the several benefactions for the relief of dis- 
tressed housekeepers and for buying good books to be given to 
the poor at my death shall be sent to the residing or officiating 
minister and churchwardens or overseers of the poor in all and 
every the several townships above mentioned within two months 
after my decease. And I do direct and desire that my Executors Tablet of 

•11 '.I 1^1*1 1 'I bene£EU!tion8 

Will, as soon as conveniently may be after my decease, m order to be hung 
as well to prevent any error or misapplication in the distribution cfiaehes. 
of my benefactions as to induce others to the like charitable 
donations, procure a tablet to be hung up in each of the parish 
churches of Middle wich and Sandbach, in some conspicuous part 
of the walls thereof, with an inscription to be written on each 
such tablet in large letters and expressed in the following 
words : — " Be it remembered that by the appointment and 
donation of the late Reverend John Hulse of Elworth, in the 
County of Chester, Clerk, by a grant or deed inroUed in the 
Court of Chancery November the fourth, one thousand seven 
hundred and seventy-thoee, there is an annual rent-charge of 
ten pounds from his Estate in Clive given and appropriated in 
trust for the following purposes, videlicet, four pounds to be 
annually distributed by the vicar and churchwardens of Middle- 
wich Parish in the said County, after evening service, on every 
first Sunday after Christmas-day, in the chancel of Middlewich 
Church, amongst poor housekeepers who should dwell in and 
belong to the said township of Middlewich, in proportion to their 
particular distress, that is to say, to such only as should appear 
to be persons of sober and good character of the Protestant 
religion, having no relief or pension from the said township, yet 
appearing to want the same; in short, as the said John Hulse 
describes in his own words, such as may be too modest to desire 
relief yet seem too deserving to be denied, by which his express 
words the said charity is so limited and restrsdned as to be given 
to such persons only and no other persons whatsoever. And on 
trust tlmt another four pounds (further part of the said rent- 

VOL. III. 9 



298 

charge) should annually by the vicar or residing minister and 
churchwardens of the parish of Sandbach in the said county be 
distributed and given to such persons only as before described, 
who are inhabitants of and belong to the township of Sandbach 
only, to be given in the same manner as the annual four pounds 
given to Middlewich. And on further trust that the residue of 
the said rent-charge of ten pounds should be paid to the vicar 
or resident minister for the time being of Middlewich aforesaid 
on condition that he should once in every two years preach a 
sermon in the afternoon of the first Sunday after Christmas-day 
on that truly Christian duty of doing good to mankind, or that 
amiable virtue of charity, a subject which can at no time be un- 
to^?ulS?* seasonable." And whereas devises to religious and charitable 
pubii/hlS^ uses may seem to be more uncommon of late and too much dis- 
newspapers, eouragcd, many persons not rightly understanding the extent 
and meaning of the late Mortmain Act, it is my desire that a 
short paragrapli be drawn to the following effect, signifying that 
after a proper provision made by such a testator, the Reverend 
John Hulse, late of Elworth in the County of Chester, clerk, 
for his several relations, he having left no children nor his rela- 
tions having any, there are such particular endowments and 
benefactions left by him to the University of Cambridge, as also 
a certain provision for the education ^here of four clergymen's 
sons with the conditions on which the benefactions are left and 
to what religious uses, the same with their several uses and the 
salaries left for their support to be all particularly expressed, 
but in a summary way, and a concise abstract of the same to be 
inserted within six months after my decease in two different but 
more noted London newspapers, to the intent that in an age so 
abandoned to vice and devoted to shameful infidelity and luxury 
it may prove a means through the Divine grace to induce others 
Legacies to to the like seasonablo benefactions. I s:ive to my nephew and 

L . Leeke ® */ r 

T%m\ h Executor Balph Leeke (and this exclusive of any debt or sum of 
money that is at this time or may at any time hereafter become 
due or owing to him from me) the sum of sixty pounds as a gift 
or legacy only, and to the Reverend Mr John Smith another of 
my Executors the sum of forty pounds, and to my other Executor 
vlwdie -^^ Thomas Vawdrey the like sum of forty pounds, and to my 
Hal?*** *** brother-in-law Mr Richard Edward Hall eight guineas, and also 



299 

to my nephew Mr Edward Hall ten guineas. I give to the S[,f*'^**- 
Society assembling annually at Warrington the sum of thirty society at 
pounds for the use of the widows and children of distressed ^^^^ 
clergymen, and likewise to the Infirmary at Chester the sum of Chester in- 
ten pounds; I give to my faithful servant Elizabeth Holford, whd 
is now married to Thomas Plant, if she shall continue to live in tua, piant 
my family and service to the time of my death, the sum of sixty 
pounds (and this exclusive of any debts which now are or may 
hereafter become due from me either to her or to her husband); 
and if at that time I shall likewise keep three other servants in servants. 
my family, my will is that the sum of twenty pounds shall be 
given to such other servant who shall at that time have lived 
the longest in my family immediately before and until my de^ 
cease, twelve pounds to such other servant as shall have so lived 
with me the next in point of time, and eight pounds to such 
other servant as shall have so lived with me the shortest time. 
And if the said Elizabeth Holford shall have left my family and 
service before my death and I shall then keep four other servants 
in my family, in that case I direct that twenty pounds shall be 
given to the first, ten pounds to the second, six pounds to the 
third, and four pounds to the fourth such servant, according as 
they shall stand in priority of time and service with me imme- 
diately previous to my death. And if it shall happen that after Residue or 
payment of my debts, legacies and funeral expences, there shall SSS""" 
be a residue of my personal estate, and such residue shall not 
amount to more than sixty pounds, in that case I direct that the 
same shall be given and divided amongst all my domestic 
servants (including the said Elizabeth Holford if then with me) in 
proportion to the different length of time they shall have lived 
with me immediately previous to my decease. And if such 
residue shall exceed sixty pounds and yet not amount to one 
hundred pounds, I will that the sixty pounds shall be placed out 
at interest and the remainder given amongst my servants in the 
same manner and proportion as hereinbefore directed in case 
such residue had not amounted to sixty pounds. And if such 
residue shall amount to one hundred pounds or upwards, I direct 
that the same shall likewise be placed forth at interest after de- 
ducting therefrom so much as will reduce it to an even sum, 
to wit, if the same shall amount to between one hundred pounds 

9 — 2 



300 

and one hundred and ten pounds to be reduced to one hundred 
pounds, if it shall amount to any sum between one hundred and 
ten pounds and one hundred and twenty pounds to be reduced 
to one hundred and ten pounds, and so progressively, and the 
overplus so to be deducted for the purpose of making an even 
sum shall be given to my servants in the proportion last above 
mentioned. And it is my will and meaning that the sum so to 
be placed forth at interest shall be put out by and in the names 
of the said Ralph Leeke, John Smith and Thomas Yawdrey, or 
the survivors or survivor of them, or the executors, adminis- 
trators, or assigns of such survivor, and the interest and produce 
thereof annually paid unto and amongst my said servants in 
proportion to the time they shall respectively have lived with 
me previous to my death during their respective natural lives, 
and when any of them shall die the share and interest before 
payable to such descendant shall go and be paid from time to 
time in the same proportion amongst the survivors and survivor 
of them. And from and after the death of my said servants, I 
direct that the principal sum so placed out shall by the said 
Kalph Leeke, John Smith and Thomas Vawdrey, or the sur- 
vivors or survivor of them, his executors, administrators, or 
assigns, be paid over to the then surviving trustees appointed by 
my before-mentioned grant or rent-charge of ten pounds from 
my estate in Clive, to be by them placed forth at interest, and 
such interest for ever appropriated and paid to the same objects 
of charity in Middlewich and Sandbach equally as in the said 
grant is directed with respect to eight pounds, part of the said 
annual sum of ten pounds. And if such additional ben^action 
to the townships of Middlewich and Sandbach shall take place 
I request my Executors to insert the amount and purport thereof 
in the tablets hereinbefore directed to be hung up in the parish 
churches of Middlewich and Sandbach, as well as in the parish- 
books respectively kept in each of the parishes. I give to each 
of the servants in my family at my decease one suit of mourning 
and likewise one guinea a-piece to such as shall have lived with 
me one but not two years, and to such as shall then be living in 
my service and family and have continued therein above two 
years the sum of two pounds for every such year after the said 
two years over and above^ their wages as a legacy, but the same 



301 

shall Dot be allowed or given for either of the two first years. To Legadea. 

such of my worthy friends as are hereinafter mentioned I leave or 

give as follows : To my much esteemed friend Doctor Fothergill DrFothergUL 

of London five guineas, and to the Reverend Mr Hunter vicar Mr Hunter. 

of Weeverham, author of the Answer to Lord Bolingbroke, the 

sum of two guineas, and to the said Mr Joseph Skerratt the Mr skerrstt 

like sum of two guineas. I likewise leave or give the sum of 

five pounds to the distressed housekeepers of the township of pwtrewed 

'' I r housekeepers 

Sandbach and that dwell there, and the like sum of five pounds inf^fdaiS? 
to the distressed housekeepers of the township of Middlewich "^'^^ 
and that likewise dwell in that township, the same to be given 
within two months after my decease in the chancel of each 
church on the Sunday after evening service, and to such persons 
only as are too modest to desire relief yet seem too deserving to be 
denied, and that in other respects answer to the character and de- 
scription given of them by me in the grant of an annual rent-charge 
lately executed for their use by me from my lands in Clive, and 
since enrolled in Chancery as is hereinbefore mentioned. And lastly, 
I do appoint the said Ralph Leeke, John Smith and Thomas 
Vawdrey, Executors of this my last Will and Testament, and do 
particularly rely on their fidelity and care for the proper exe- 
cution of their several trusts. And as to one particular annuity 
in this my Will as before expressed, my further meaning is, that 
whereas Elizabeth Holford therein mentioned is since married to 
Thomas Plant, now in my family and service, and whereas I 
have left one annuity during her natural life of thirty pounds a 
year with some legacies to the said Elizabeth Holford, now 
Elizabeth Plant, on certain conditions before mentioned, it is now 
my will and meaning that the said annuity and legacies shall 
belong to her alone. And these I leave and give exclusive of 
any debts which now are or may hereafter become due from me 
either to her or her husband, and shall be to her sole use and 
considered as her property only and at her disposal by any act, 
deed, or will, notwithstanding her coverture, and as such shall 
be payable to her or her order only and to none else, and shall 
become due on the former conditions only as to her continuance 
in my family and service until my death as before mentioned, 
and not otherwise. And that her receipt alone shall be a sufii* 
cient discharge or acquittance for the above, whether annuity or 



302 

legacy, whenever the same shall be duly paid at the times before 
mentioned. And as to my three principal Trustees in Gam- 
bridge, namely, the Vice-Chancellor, the Master of Trinity 
College and the Master of Saint John's College, though there is 
great reason to believe that they will freely contribute their 
best endeavours to the promoting so good a design, yet it is 
£2. 2f. to the now my desire and my will that the small sum of two guineas 
£?°ii/ w *^ ^^^ Vice-Chancellor and of one guinea and half to each of the 
STrinu?**" two other Trustees shall every year become due and payable on 
Mutfr ofst the first day of January, and the first payment to be made after 
i^^m"^' the first full year from my decease, and afterwards instead 
v^unthl thereof another allowance of three pence in the pound to the 

UuivGTsitv 

and then, £c. Yice-Chancellor and of two pence in the pound to each of the 
two other Trustees shall commence, that is to say, from such 
time as any of the above-mentioned Estates shall become vested 
in the said University in possession, and not sooner, and such 
last allowance shall from that time take place and be duly paid 
every year out of the rents of those estates by those learned 
persons that shall be entitled to receive the salaries before men- 
tioned, as a small and humble acknowledgment of the trouble 
which my said trustees may have on their account, at which 
What clauses time the former allowance shall entirely cease. And as to the 
printed at particular clauses before mentioned that relate to any of the 
endowments by me left for the use of those learned persons, 
which clauses were directed to be printed before their several 
works, by way of preface or introduction to the same, and were 
also directed to be printed at large, and in the very words of 
the Will, some of which being very long would so far add to 
the trouble and expence occasioned by printing the same, it is 
therefore now my will to have only such particular clauses as 
most expressly and at large describe the duty or office of the 
Lecturer, and of the Christian Advocate, and of the author 
of the dissertation, to be printed whole and entire and in the 
very words of the Will as to the duty or office to be performed, 
without alteration or abridgment; and as to all the other clauses 
which relate to the future augmentation of the salaries, or to 
the endowment or establishment of the scholarships, or to the 
qualifications of the scholars with their particular annuities and 
augmentations, my will is that only the material parts, or 



303 

chief heads and stipends shall be mentioned, and in a concise 
way and with few words, so as to save all unnecessary trouble 
and expence in printing the same, which will fully answer my 
intention; for the clauses which express the particular office or 
duty to be performed do at the same time likewise particularly 
mention the immediate or the principal stipend or salary annexed 
to each, and these last clauses only are to be printed as they 
stand verbatim and entire, and all the other clauses are to be 
abridged and the substance only expressed in few words, and 
none but those particular clauses which relate to each particular 
treatise, or which are expressly directed to be therewith (as the 
endowment of the scholarships is with the sermons), shall be 
printed alons^ with or as an introduction to the same. And whereas schoianhip 

, * . • . 1 . ontheClive 

I have before in this my Will left an endowment for one Scholarship ^^n/uS^" 
from my Lands in Clive, I do now on more mature deliberation S'SeE^° 
think fit to revoke and make void the same, and I do now hereby '"^* 
revoke every clause relative to the foundation and endowment 
of that scholarship from Clive only, and declare the same to be 
wholly void; and as to the annuity from Clive annexed to it, 
and its future augmentations from Newton and Middlewich, I do 
hereby annex all the salary, and for ever appropriate the whole 
to the sole use and benefit of the Lecturer or Preacher as an 
addition to his other stipend, the whole of that annuity and of 
those augmentations to be received every year by him only and 
to remain to his sole use and benefit for ever, subject to the like 
restrictions as before specified respecting the original endowment 
for the ssdd Lecturer or Preacher. And it is also my will that 9ov««wtiii 

, *> Leases to pre- 

no lease shall ever be made to any tenants without an express ^«°^ ''"•*«• 
clause to be inserted therein, to prevent any voluntary and 
permissive waste by them or others in any of my said Lands 
or Tenements, with a sufficient penalty to be incurred or for- 
feited for falling or cropping trees (unless for repairs and 
re-building thereon as before mentioned), or for any other waste 
committed either through their fault or neglect whatsoever. And 
as to this my Will, if the same shall not be duly proved and a 
regular copy thereof shall not be sent to my Trustees in Cam- 
bridge within six months after my death, then for such omission 
or neglect, each of my Executors or Trustees shall lose or forfeit 
one-half of such legacy or legacies as they would otherwise have 



304 

been entitled to; all which forfeitures shall then sink into my per. 
Bonal Estate and go along with that to m j residuary legatees. And 
likewise if any of my £xecutors shall die in less than two years 
after my decease, and before the books hereinbefore particularly 
mentioned are distributed, and all my other benefactions intended 
for this neighbourhood are duly given as directed, in such case 
one-half of such legacy which such Executor or Executors dying 
as aforesaid might otherwise haye been entitled to, shall then go 
to such new Executor as shall succeed and duly act in his room, 
anything herein contained to the contrary in any wise not- 
Executor, withstanding; and if it shall happen that any of my Executors or 

not accepting ® *^* •/. • t 

of Trust. Trustees shall not accept such Trust, or if acceptmg shall neglect 
the same, in such case such Executor or Trustee so neglecting, 
shall entirely lose his or their particular annuities and legacies 
and all advantages from this my Will, and one-half of such for- 
feiture (that is of such legacy only) shall then go to the person 
that shall succeed and duly act as Executor in his room, and the 
other half shall sink into the personal Estate to go to the resi- 
duary legatees as before directed, and such forfeited. annuity 
shall go to such uses as are before appointed on the death of 
such Executor, anything herein contained to the contrary in^any 
wise notwithstanding; and as to' all other articles, whether annu- 
ities or legacies as well as debts, my will is that the same shall 
be duly and punctually paid as before directed, and not at all 
suspended or delayed like the legacies to those Executors in the 
cases last mentioned on account of those contingencies. And as to 
the sale of my own books, whatever the sum from thence arising 
shall amount to more than one hundred pounds, for every fifty 
pounds of such overplus, my will is that the sum of two pounds 
ten shillings, and so in proportion for any greater or less sum, 
shall be paid and given (out of such overplus only) to such of my 
Executors or Trustees as shall have the care and trouble of 
selling the same, as a reward for such their diligence. And in like 
manner I request and rely upon the care and fidelity of all my 
Executors in the conscientious execution of the great trusts 
herein committed to their care, and may the Divine blessing for 
ever go along with all my benefactions, and may the greatest 
and the best of Beings, by his all- wise providence and gracious 
influence, make the same e£fectual to his own glory and the good 



Books. 



306 

of my fellow-creatares I Thas earnestly praying that due honour 
and reverence may be ever paid to the Supreme Fountain of 
bliss and goodness, and sincerely wishing all increase of true 
religion and virtue and satisfaction to mankind, I desire when 
the Divine Providence shall think fit to exchange this frail and 
transitory state for one that is infinitely and eternally happy in 
Jesus Christ, Amen. In witness whereof and to this my Will 
(the conclusion of which I now think proper to write thus with 
my own hand, as I have also myself deliberately drawn many 
paragraphs herein contained, and which are now expressed in 
my own words as well as duly considered and directed the whole), 
I do therefore now accordingly subscribe and affix my hand and 
seal, and likewise to another the duplicate of this, and in all 
respects exactly the same Will, and of the same date with this, 
which I thought proper to provide to prevent accidents, and at 
the same time that I revoke and cancel all former Wills by me 
made at any time, I do declare this and the duplicate of this to 
be my last Will and testament, this twenty-first day of July, in 
the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and seventy- 
seven. 

JOHN HULSE. 

The writing contained in this and the preceding pages was 
signed, sealed, published and declared by the Testator, the 
Reverend Mr. John Hulse, as and for his last Will and Testament 
in the presence of us, and by us attested and subscribed in his 
presence, the Testator having also written his name at the 
bottom of each page in our presence. 

LAvt'RKNCE Steble of Saudhach^ Tronmcmger. 
Wm. Lowndes, June, of Sandbach. 
Richard Darlington of Sandbach. 
Thos. Danibl of BradwalL 

Extract from the first Codicil^ March 3, 1779. 

And whereas the waste lands in Clive are now going to be 
enclosed by the consent and for the use of the Freeholders of 
that township, wherein one of my estates lies, as mentioned in 
my Will, when the same shall be completed, and a proportionable 



306 

share thereof allotted to be added in my right to mj estate there, 
it is my will and mind that, after sach addition shall be made, 
the annual sum of ten pounds from my lands in Clive shall be 
likewise added to the reward or premium for the best disserta- 
tion, such ten pounds to be duly paid every year to the author 
of such dissertation, and to go and be received by him for his 
own use from my estates in Clive, as an additional reward over 
and above all that I have before left in my Will for that purpose, 
anything therein before contained to the contrary in any wise 
notwithstanding. 

Extract from the third Codicil^ August 17, 1782. 

And whereas I have therein left or devised an annuity 
of thirty pounds a year (as the rents then stood) to be 
paid from my Lands in Sandbach to my brother Robert Hulse, 
who is since then dead, and after his decease to go to the use 
and support of one of the three scholars in Saint John's College 
in Cambridge, as is particularly mentioned in my Will, I do now 
declare and appoint that instead of going immediately to such 
use, the same shall go directly on my decease and be paid in the 
following manner, that is to say, the same annuity, whether more 
or less, as the rents shall then stand, shall be every year divided 
into two equal parts or shares, and one such half or equal share 
shall every year be paid during her life to the said Ellen Delves, 
the sister of my servant before mentioned ; and the other half or 
moiety shall be likewise paid every year to my ingenious friend 
Mr Edward Kyley of Sandbach, during his life, to whom I 
likewise leave my Violins and Flutes, and all Corelli'*s Works 
and Purcell's Book of Songs with his Sonatas, and all my Solos 
and Sonatas and single songs for those instruments, as he has 
shewn so much care and judgment by some very useful additions 
which he has made to my organ, of which he understands the 
construction so well, and is indeed a fine mechanical genius buried 
in obscurity; to whom I therefore give an equal share of the above 
annuity, and the other half to the said Mrs Delves, to be duly 
paid to each during their joint lives. And it is also my mind and 
will, and I direct that on the death of either the said Ellen 
Delves or Edward Byley, their particular share (whether his or 



307 

hers) shall go Immediately to my good servant Elizabeth Plant 
before mentioned, to be for her sole use during her life, and if 
she shall outlive the other two, then she shall have the whole of 
the annuity, and in like manner the survivor of the three shall 
have the whole, and from and after the decease of all those 
three, and not before, the said annuity shall go to the support 
of one of those three scholars that are particularly mentioned in 
my Will. 

Ejstractfrom the sixth Codicil^ Sept 10, 1785. 

And as to whatever money I shall have at my decease, or 
which may then be due to me, or shall arise from the sale of my 
personal estate, it is my will that the same shall be placed out to 
interest until it can be laid out in some convenient purchase 
of land (which I earnestly desire to have done as soon as possible) ; 
and as an encouragement thereto I direct that the sum of ten 
pounds, besides all reasonable expences, shall be given as a reward 
to such Trustee as shall be most instrumental to such purchase ; 
and it is also my will that all the rents and profits that shall 
arise from such purchased lands, or from any before purchased 
in my lifetime, shall all go to the sole use or benefit of my two 
faithful servants Thomas Plant and Elizabeth his present wife 
and to the survivor during their natural lives, and that they or 
tha survivor of them shall every year duly receive those rents or 
the interest of all the money before mentioned (until the same 
shall be laid out in land) to their own use and benefit, along with 
their annmties : And from and after the decease of both, and not 
before, the whole of those rents or the interest of all the money 
shall be divided into six equal parts or shares, and that three of 
such parts shall go every year to the use of the Lecturer or 
Preacher mentioned in my Will, and that two other such parts 
shall likewise be received every year by the Christian Advocate 
for his own use, and the remaining sixth part shall also go and 
be given to the author of the best dissertation as an additional 
reward to each, and to no other use whatsoever. 



308 



Extract from the eighth Codicil^ Nov. 22, 1788. 

I the before-named John Halse, Testator of the foregoing 
Will, bearing date on or aboat the first day of July, in the year 
of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and seventy-seven, do 
make this as a Codicil to my said Will, and do order and direct 
that the same be considered and taken as part of and annexed to 
my said Will as an additional eighth Codicil thereto : Whereas 

Estate in I the Said John Hulse have lately purchased a Messuas:e or Te- 
nement and Lands in Moston, in the County of Chester, from the 
Right Honorable Lord George Vernon, late in the holding of 
Bichard Darlington as tenant to the said Lord George Vernon, 
now in my possession and in the possession of my under-tenants 
and assigns; Now I do hereby give, devise and bequeath the 
rents, issues and profits of the same Estate and Premises, subject 
to the annuities hereinafter mentioned (from and immediately 
after the payment of my debts and legacies) unto my servant 

ToT. andB. Thomas Plant and Elizabeth his now wife for and during^ their 

Plant for ... • • , . 

their lives, joint livos, and to the survivor of them during his or her life for 

their, his and her sole use : and from and immediately after the 

decease of the survivor of them the said Thomas Plant and 

Elizabeth his wife, it is my mind and desire that the rents, issues 

and profits of the same Estate and Premises for ever, subject to 

the annuities hereinafter mentioned (if my debts and legades 

shall be then paid and satisfied), be divided into six equal parts or 

shares, and that three such parts thereof be yearly received and 

h^f touie**" **^®^ ^y ^^ Lecturer or Preacher mentioned in my Will or the 

uSJto'the^ Codicil thereto annexed for the time being, and two other such 

vSSt^Snt?" equal parts to be yearly received and taken by the Christian 

S^settatorf Advocate, also mentioned in my Will or the Codicil thereto 

annexed, as an increase to both their salaries, and the remaining 

sixth part or share to be yearly received and taken by the 

author of the best Dissertation, as an additional reward for his 

Charged with troublo respectiufi: the same. And I do hereby char&^e the same 

two annuities i o » o 

^^^* Estate and Premises (from and immediately after the payment of 
aojjoM. njy debts and legacies) with the payment of an annuity or yearly 
sum of forty shillings to Mary Proudlove, wife of Joseph Proud- 
love of Sandbach, in the County of Chester, at Christmas yearly 
(in case her life and conversation from henceforth as long as she 



Delves. 



309 

shall live be not any ways bad or immoral) ; and also (from and 
upon the contingency aforesaid) with the payment of one annuity 
or yearly sum of twenty shillings to Martha Moss, of Elton, in the 
Parish of Warmingham, in the said County, schoolmistress, at 
Christmas yearly (in case her life and conversation from henceforth 
as long as she^hall live be not any ways bad or immoral); And 
■whereas I have before left an annuity of fifteen pounds a-year, and 
afterwards a second annuity of fifteen pounds more on a contin- 
gency to Mrs Ellen Delves, payable from my lands in Sandbach and ^"J}|*jy' ^^ 
Brad wall ; and also all the interest of all the money then placed J^oj^gg*"" 
out at interest, or thereafter to be placed out at interest, to the 
said Ellen Delves and her husband for their joint lives, and the 
life of the survivor of them ; Now I do hereby revoke, cancel 
and make void all and every that clause and clauses that in any 
wise relate to those annuities, or to any money or interest of 
money whatsoever therein-mentioned to be paid, or hereafter pay- 
able, and instead and lieu thereof, do give and bequeath to the 
said Ellen Delves an annuity of five pounds a-year only for her ^S^o'ifugJ 
life ; and twenty-five pounds, the remaining part of the said two 
fifteen pounds annuities, I give and bequeath to the said Thomas 
Plant and Elizabeth his wife for their joint lives, and to the sur- 
vivor of them for his or her life, in consideration of the care and 
attention that they have shewed to me in my now most infirm 
and weak condition; and in case the said Ellen Delves shall 
happen to die in the lifetime of the said Thomas Plant and Eliza- 
beth his wife, or in the lifetime of the survivor, it is my mind and 
desire that the same annuity of five pounds shall be paid to the 
said Thomas Plant and Elizabeth his wife, during their joint 
lives, and to the survivor of them during his or her life, and do 
declare that the several annuities hereinbefore and hereinafter 
named (in case of non-payment of their annuities) shall have 
the like power to distrain, and the like remedies for recovery of 
their said annuities as any other annuitants have under or by 
virtue of my Will or the Codicils thereto annexed. And whereas 
I have left an Endowment for three Scholarships, which I have Thijdscho- 

, * ]arship on 

appointed to be paid from my lands in Sandbach and Bradwall, f^^^^^ 
one of which was to have commenced after the death of my ^°*^**** 
brother Robert Uulse (who is since dead) and after the death of 
the said Thomas Plant and Elizabeth his present wife, and the 



310 

said Ellen Delves, now I do hereby declare that the said 
Scholarship shall be entirely struck off, set aside and abolished : 
And it is mj will and mind that the said Endowment shall be 
divided into three equal parts or shares; two-third parts or 
shares whereof shall every year go to the Lecturer or Preacher 
hereinbefore mentioned, and the remaining third ^bH to the said 
Christian Advocate before mentioned, in augmentation of the sa- 
laries of the said Preacher and Christian Advocate. 



; 



2. Order of the Court of Chancer y, Dec. 21, 1830. 

After reciting the parts of the Will of Mr Hulse which 
relate to the Lectureship the Order of the Court thus pro* 
ceeds : — 

That the Hereditaments and Premises in the said Will 
mentioned were vested in the said University; that the said 
Keverend John Hulse died in the year 1798, from which 
time until the year 1819 no person could be found who 
would undertake the office of the said Lectureship and, as 
appeared from a memorandum inserted by Dr. Turner, Vice- 
Chancellor of the said University, in the year 1806, in Mr. 
Hulse's book, it was found impracticable to carry into effect 
that part of Mr. Hulse's Will, appointing a Lecturer or Reader ; 
that in the year 1819 the Reverend Christopher Benson was 
appointed to the office of the said Lectureship, and held the same 
until the year 1822, when he relinquished the said office, having 
found the terms and conditions imposed by the said testator too 
fatiguing and laborious to admit of his continuing to perform the 
duties of the said office any longer ; that upon the resignation of 
the said Reverend Christopher Benson the Reverend James 
Clarke Franks was appointed, and held the same during the year 
1823, in the Christmas of which year he resigned the said office^ 
and the same continued vacant until the 31st day of December, 
1825, notwithstanding the said Trustees gave notice that the 
said office remained vacant, and endeavoured to induce candidates 
for the same to come forward ; that on the said 31st day of 
December, 1825, the Reverend Temple Chevallier was appointed 
to the said office, and held the same until the month of July in 



311 

the year 1828, when he relinquished the same, having found the 
terms and conditions imposed by the said testator too tedious 
and laborious to admit of his continuing to perform the duties of 
the said office any longer ; that upon the resignation of the said 
Reverend Temple Ghevallier, the Reverend Richard Newton 
Adams, then a Bachelor of Divinity, was duly elected to the said 
office, but he refused to accept the same by reason of the fatigues 
thereof and in consequence of the obligation imposed by the 
said Will to preach so great a number of Lectures upon the 
same subject, and the extreme difficulty of complying with the 
terms of the said Will ; that on the refusal of the said Reverend 
Richard Newton Adams to accept the said office the Trustees for 
the time being of the funds arising under the said Will appro- 
priated to the purposes of the said Lectureship gave further 
notice in the University of Cambridge, that they were willing 
to elect any qualified and fit person to the said office, who might 
be willing to accept the same upon the terms of the said Will, 
but that no qualified person had ofi^ered himself as a candidate 
for such office, and the said office had remained vacant since the 
year 1828, by reason that no person qualified as directed by the 
said Will had been found willing to accept the same, so that from 
the year 1790 to the present time only three qualified persons 
had been found to accept the said office, who had all resigned the 
same in consequence of their inability to comply with the onerous 
conditions imposed upon them by the Founder's Will ; that the 
number of Lectures directed by the said Will to be delivered 
occasioned very great inconvenience to the University (if de- 
livered) by causing the pulpit at Saint Mary's Church to be 
occupied for so great a number of Sunday afternoons in every 
year ; that the time limited by the said Will for the delivery and 
printing of the said Lectures was too short, taking into con- 
sideration the number of such Lectures to be delivered in con- 
formity with the provisions of the said Will ; that the number of 
Lectures directed by the said Robert Boyle to be delivered was 8; 
that by reason of the number of the said Lectures to be delivered, 
as directed by the said testator, amounting to 20, it had not 
been possible to find any person duly qualified willing to ac- 
cept the said office, since the vacancy thereof by the resignation 
of the Reverend Temple Chevallier ; that it would be most bene- 



■^ 



312 

ficial to the said Uniyersity, and absolutely necessary to give effect 
to the intention of the said testator, that the number of the said 
Lectures should be reduced to 8, or to such other number as to 
this court should appear proper, and that the time so limited for 
printing the said Lectures might be enlarged for the term of 
one year from the delivery of the last of such Lectures ; that the 
petitioners John Higman and Henry John Rose were Masters of 
Arts of the said University, and were eligible to the said office, 
but that the said petitioners would not accept the same as at 
present regulated by the Will of the said testator, and therefore 
pray that the number of the said Lectures might be reduced 
to 8, or to such other number as to his Lordship should seem 
meet, and that the time limited for printing the said Lectures 
might be enlarged for the term of one year from the delivery of 
the last of such Lectures, or that his Lordship might refer it to 
one of the Masters of this court, to settle a proper scheme for 
modifying and carrying into execution the said office of Lecturer 
as near to the intention of the said testator as circumstances 
would admit : Whereupon all parties concerned were ordered to 
attend his Lordship on the matter of the said petition, and coun- 
sel for the petitioners this day attending accordingly, upon hearing 
the said petition and the said Will of the said John Hulse, dated 
the 21st day of July, 1777, read, and what was alleged by the 
counsel for the petitioners ; this court doth order that the num- 
ber of the Lectures in the petition mentioned be reduced to 8, 
and it is ordered that the time limited for printing the said 
Lectures be enlarged for the term of one year from the deli- 
very of the last of such Lectures. 



313 



XIII. The Fitzwilliam Museum. 

1. Extract from the Will of Richard Viaamnt Fitzvnlliam^ 

dated Aug, 18, 1815. 

I GIVE and bequeath unto the Chancellor, Masters and 
Scholars of the University of Cambridge all my capital stock in the 
New South Sea Annuities, to be had and held by them the said 
Chancellor, Masters and Scholars, and their successors for ever, 
upon the trusts and to and for the intents and purposes herein* 
after expressed and declared touching and concerning the same, 
and as to all my pictures, portraits, prints, drawings and engray* 
ings, whether framed, glazed or otherwise, and also the frames 
and glass thereof respectively, all my books, printed, engraved 
or manuscript, bound or unbound, all my music, bound and 
unbound, all my busts, statues, medals, gems, precious stones 
and bronzes whatsoever, which shall belong to me at the time of 
my decease I give and bequeath the same unto the said Chan* 
cellor. Masters and Scholars of the said University of Cambridge, 
and their successors, for ever, upon the trusts and for the intent9 
and purposes hereinafter expressed, declared and contained 
touching and concerning the same. And I do hereby declare my 
Will to be, and hereby direct that the said Chancellor, Masters 
and Scholars do and shall with all convenient speed after my 
decease, by and out of the dividends and annual proceeds of my 
said New South Sea Annuities, so directed to be transferred to 
them as aforesaid, cause to be erected and built a good substan- 
tial and convenient Museum, Repository or other building within 
the precincts of the said University for the reception and preser- 
vation of the said pictures, books and other articles, or to pur- 
chase one or more erections or buildings for that purpose, and in 
the mean time and until such a Museum, Repository or other 
building shall be erected, built or purchased as aforesaid, to pro- 
cure a proper building for their temporary reception, and to pay 
rent and taxes for the same, and also to pay and defray all the 
costs, charges and expences attendmg the removing and depositing 
the said respective articles. And I do hereby direct that the said 

VOL. III. 10 



314 

William Sheldon and Edward Roberts, or the Buryiyor of them, 
do cause a regular schedule or inventory to be made of the said 
several articles, and shall cause two fair copies of such schedule 
or inventory to be made, one of which copies I direct shall be 
signed by them the said William Sheldon and Edward Roberts, 
or the survivor of them, and that the other copy shall be signed 
by the Vice-chancellor of the said University for the time being, 
and that the copy so to be signed by the said William Sheldon 
and Edward Roberts, or the survivor of them, shall be delivered 
to the said yice-Chancellor and deposited in the place where the 
said several articles are kept, and that the copy to be signed by 
the said Yice-Chancellor shall be delivered to the said William 
Sheldon and Edward Roberts, or one of them, to be kept by 
them or one of them. And it is my Will, and I do hereby direct, 
that none of my said pictures, books or other articles before 
mentioned shall be taken or removed from the Museum or Repo- 
Bitory for the time being by any perBon or persons whomsoeyer. 
or on any account or upon any pretence whatsoever, except only 
in the case of fire happening and then during the time the neces- 
sity continues. And I do hereby declare my Will to be, and 
hereby direct, that the expenoe of keeping such pictures, books 
and other articles before mentioned, and the salaries of officers 
and other persons to be employed in or about the same, 
shall be discharged with and out of the dividends and annual 
proceeds of the said New South Sea Annuities so given and 
bequeathed as aforesaid. And I do hereby declare that the bequests 
so by me made to the said Chancellor, Masters and Scholars of the 
said University, are so made to them for the purpose of promoting 
the increase of learning and the other great objects of that noble 
foundation, but the particular arrangement, economy and dispo- 
sition of the property comprised in the said legacies and bequests 
I have made and given, I commit (subject to the several trusts 
herein-before expressed) to the direction and management of the 
said Chancellor, Masters and Scholars in such manner as is 
provided by the laws and usages of the said University. 

And after other dispositions he gave the residue of his per- 
sonal estate to George Augustus Earl of Pembroke and Mont- 
gomery, and appointed him sole executor of his Will. 



315 



2. Extract from the Will of Mr, Daniel Meaman of 

Knightsbridge. 

I GIVE and bequeath unto my said brother, Charles Mesman, 
the use of all mj pictures, framed and not framed, prints and 
drawings, and all the frames, for and during the term of his 
natural life ; and from and after his decease I give and bequeath 
the same absolutely to the Chancellor and Yice-Chancellor of the 
University of Cambridge for the time being upon trust and to 
the end, intent and purpose that the same may be placed in the 
Fitzwilliam Museum at Cambridge, where I wish Mr. John 
Seguier of Coventry Street to be permitted to arrange and 
superintend their hanging. 



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